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Peter’s Take: Cuccinelli and Virginia’s Women

by Peter Rousselot | March 19, 2013 at 2:55 pm | 2,049 views | 148 Comments

Peter’s Take is a weekly opinion column published on Tuesdays. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Peter RousselotRepublican Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli wants to be elected Virginia Governor this year. If he succeeds, the values on which he has built his political career ensure that he would exploit every opportunity to set Virginia’s women back 60 years to an era in which they were “stuck in the drudgery of domestic servitude.”

You think I’m exaggerating? Cuccinelli supports a “personhood amendment” to Virginia’s Constitution.

The practical effect of enacting a personhood law in Virginia would be to end or cripple a series of personal rights and private decisions that Virginia’s women have enjoyed for decades, such as:

  • Birth control
  • Fertility treatment
  • Management of a miscarriage
  • Access to safe and legal abortions

Cuccinelli is also the godfather of the effort to drive all abortion clinics in Virginia out of business. In 2011, the Virginia legislature passed a law that classified abortion clinics that perform more than 5 first-trimester abortions per month as hospitals rather than doctor’s offices. The intent of the law, candidly admitted by many of its sponsors, was to drive these clinics out of business entirely because of the expense of compliance.

This 2011 abortion clinic law was patterned after an earlier bill that Cuccinelli had sponsored when he was in the Virginia State Senate. In his current role as Attorney General, Cuccinelli has fought every step of the way to be sure that this abortion clinic law is harshly and mercilessly applied to wipe these clinics out.

Further cementing his role as a champion of setting women’s rights back decades, Cuccinelli recently welcomed a $1.5 million pledge to his campaign for Governor from the Susan B. Anthony List — “a national organization known for its extreme stance on women’s health care.”

A Virginia governed by Ken Cuccinelli would be a 21st century real-life version of Margaret Atwood’s classic 1985 science fiction novel, The Handmaid’s Tale. Cuccinelli’s views on the proper role of women in our society are central to his values and the way in which he would govern our state.

This is not science fiction — this is all too real. We can’t afford to take a risk like this.

Peter Rousselot is a member of the Central Committee of the Democratic Party of Virginia and former chair of the Arlington County Democratic Committee.

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  • Anne

    Bravo, bravo! I applaud Ken Cuccinelli for taking a stand for all Virginia women and the unborn. We need more men like him in office.

    • AnneMyArse

      Thankyou steve

    • Don’t Legislate My Body

      You are kidding, of course?

      • Let_Them_Eat_Cake

        Why would Anne be kidding? Have you ever experienced a sonogram? The beautiful sound of a heartbeat not your own? Who stands for the rights of the unborn? I am in total agreement about rape and incest, but I think it is shocking the number of abortions performed each year.

        • ARL

          So you think it’s perfectly fine to kill a baby just because it was a product of rape or incest?

          Don’t lecture us about the “rights of the unborn” when you don’t respect them either.

          Either you support those “rights” for all, or none.

          • Let_Them_Eat_Cake

            I don’t think it’s perfectly fine; don’t put words in my mouth. I do believe, however, that a victim of sexual assault should certainly be in a position to decide to carry a baby to term and not have the state decide for her.

          • ARL

            So you are pro-choice. But you are shocked by the number of abortions.

            Okay, whatever.

            Oh, and you support a candidate who is not pro-choice.

            Go figure out what you stand for.

          • Let_Them_Eat_Cake

            Good Grief. Here we go…do you have a pen and paper? I respect the right of women who have been subject to rape or incent to determine if they should carry a child to term. What I find objectionable is abortion as a matter of course. Got it? get it? good.

  • Arlington Chris

    Perhaps Mr. Cuccinelli could make some comments about rape as well?

    Republicans are going to pay a high political price for this type of stuff over the next few years. The country has changed, the Republican party is falling behind.

    • novasteve

      Did you hear what a democrat in Colorado said to a rape victim that was testifying on gun rights? If a republican had said those things, he’d be finished. But a democrat does it, she gets a pass.

      http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_22731898/colorado-sen-evie-hudak-disrespected-rape-victim

      You never heard about this, because the left has huge double standards.

      • iiandyiiii

        I think she shouldn’t have argued with a rape victim, but the statements are totally different. She didn’t put out false and harmful medical information about rape and pregnancy, and she didn’t say rape babies are a blessing, and her party doesn’t have a history of making ridiculous statements about rape and rape victims.

      • Arlington Chris

        A republican said: “the female body has ways to shut that [the potential pregnancy] down”.

        The democrat said: “I just want to say that actually, statistics are not on your side even if you had had a gun.”

        I agree that is a rude way of dealing with a victim, and the democrat should apologize (as she later did).

        Having said that, most of the outrage over the republican comment was not to who or how he said it — but rather that he really seems to believe that the female body has “ways to shut that down”. The democrat believes that the statistics are not in the victim’s favor — which is a far less controversial statement even if you don’t agree on the precise statistics being used

      • Josh S

        Or maybe simply because we don’t read the Denver Post.

        • novasteve

          Yes, interesting how the national media didn’t pick it up, but it picks up stories about republicans.

          • speonjosh

            * rolls eyes *

          • novasteve

            Speonjosh: So can you explain why when a republican says something insensitive it’s all over the national media, but if a democrat does the same, it’s a local story at most? Why does republican’s career end for saying “macaca” but Jim Moran’s doesn’t even after virulently antisemitic statements?

      • ARL

        Show us where a left-learning person “gave her a pass.”

        Or withdraw your claim.

        I’m not giving you a pass.

      • novasteve

        You people are ignoring the point. You never even heard of this. Had a republican said something as insensitive, it would be a NATIONAL story.

        • ARL

          She simply said that statistics showed that she wouldn’t have been safer with a gun. Not sure how that’s insensitive.

          • novasteve

            So she shouldn’t have the right nor ability to defend herself due to someone’s statistics? It should be taken away because of someone’s statistics they found?
            Would it be okay to cite statistics to a parent whose child drowned in a backyard swimming pool
            Or cite statistics about certain lifestyles and HIV?
            No. The left would be throwing tantrums. So in short a democrat told to a rape victim “no, you sh ouldn’t be allowed to have a gun on campus becausce according to my statistics, I think it wouldn’t have helped you”. PRoblem is that people are individuals, not statistics.

          • ARL

            This is what she said:

            “The Colorado Coalition Against Gun Violence
            says that for every one woman who used a handgun to kill someone in
            self-defense, 83 were murdered by them.”

            So she was saying the victim was safer without a gun.

            That is not insensitive – it shows concern for the victim’s life. And those 83 people were people, not stats, like you said. Do they not matter? Do you think that statistics don’t prove anything?

            You may not agree with the stats, but this lady had a point that she backed up with real data to say her policy would keep this victim safer. Nothing the least bit wrong with that.

          • novasteve

            That argument is like saying women would be safer if they didn’t leave home or they wore burkas. So safer is what matters? So much for rights? If they are safer having their rights violated, then its okay?

        • Brenda

          Wrong, as usual.

  • B_Lee_D

    This column is exactly what I feared that the series of political opinion columns would end up being. Congrats Peter for winning the race to the bottom!

    • novasteve

      I would love Peter’s opinion of the gender pay gap if he’s going to fabricate stuff to make political points. Prove to use that deliberate discrimination causes the gender pay gap and not the choices women make in fields they choose to work in, hours worked, etc… Then explain if it is deliberate discrimination, why would people hire men if they could pay women 23% less for the same work?

      • iiandyiiii

        More than half of the gender wage gap is due to non-discrimination factors, like the things you mention. But it’s generally accepted that a small but significant portion of the wage gap is due to discrimination, and women should be able to sue to rectify this in situations when there actually has been discrimination.

        • novasteve

          That’s not how it’s being portrayed though. It’s being portrayed that nationwide – industry wide, women are deliberately paid 23% than men. However that comes from averaging all salaries. Another explanation is that men work more dangerous jobs, which means hazard pay. Something like 95% of all on the job fatalities are of men. There are lots of gaps in women’s favors, like medical research, college education, life expectancy, yet men aren’t out there protesting. Should women’s health research stop or be reduced until men catch up in life expectancy?

  • Clarendon Cruiser

    would anybody walk into a dental clinic that was dirty and unsanitary? Or what if the dental clinic did not have the ways and means of evacuating you while under sedation because their fire escape routes are not big enough?

    • Chris

      Find me a dental clinic that is required to have hospital-sized hallways and exam rooms

      • flux

        Show me where in the abortion clinic regs they are required to have 8-foot-wide corridors.

        • drax

          Stop playing games. Nobody believes the crap about the regulations being anything but an attempt to shut down clinics.

          Funny to see Republicans fall all over themselves to regulate a business to death.

          • novasteve

            Did the re publicans establish a department of abortion clinic inspections like democrats do every time they pass more regulations? And again, not a single one has closed. How is it being regulated to death?

          • drillbabydrill

            sometimes attempts fail. Did you notice that oil drilling has increased under Obama?

          • novasteve

            And so have drone attacks, and extrajudicial killings, and now he has added against US citizens.

          • http://twitter.com/Dezlboy Dezlboy

            novasteve, do you support extraordinary renditions?

          • novasteve

            Sure. If it’s okay to kill US citizens with drones then it’s fine to send foreigners to foreign governments to be interrogated. Point being, republicans would have been pilloried for doing the things Obama is doing. Where did Cindy Sheehan go?

          • ARL

            You love to play the hypocrite game, steve, but it can always be turned back on you. To wit:

            Is Obama wrong? Then did you “pillory” Bush for doing the same thing?

          • novasteve

            Erin Burnett called George Bush a “monkey” on live on MSNBC. The consequences? ZERO. It’s you guys who are the hypocrites. You pillory bush for doing something, then when Obama does even more of it, you ignore it.. You pretend it’s not happening, then call someone a racist for pointing out the double standard you have for Obama and Bush doing the same things.

          • ARL

            “You guys”?

            I am not Erin Burnett, and she doesn’t speak for me, or anyone else.

            You don’t know what I think of Obama.

            The world does not consist of “them” and “you” steve.

            Now, did you “pillory” Bush for sending foreigners to foreign countries to be interrogated? If not, YOU are a hypocrite for bringing up drones.

            You never learn, do you?

          • drax

            Do you support unnecessary regulation, steve?

    • malaka

      Law “does not apply to other outpatient clinics performing plastic or oral surgery” so you can fry that red herring for dinner.

    • Clarendon Cruiser

      here is what the law requires: Twenty clinics in Virginia have to follow the new rules. In part, they
      say public hallways must be at least 5 feet wide, exam rooms must be at
      least 80 square feet, and there must be at least four parking spaces for
      each surgical room and additional staff spaces.

      • flux

        Hardly draconian.

        • carfreeabortionist

          hardly logical either.

          • Clarendon Cruiser

            so what’s illogical about it? Prove your point. Or is a 9×9 room too much to ask for?

          • A_fellow

            People try to argue “logic” when they don’t know what they are talking about.

            80 square feet is a standard for any exam room in a hospital or outpatient exam and procedure facility. This is not something made up just for abortion clinics. It’s a standard requirement enforced by health departments all over, including right here in DC. Frankly, since they are doing procedures in most of these rooms the requirement should be 100 square feet.

            The 5 foot corridor requirement is another standard, 60 inches for passing wheel chairs. It’s federal law under ADA and local code law under IBC/ANSI. And again, I bet that they got off easy, because IBC (adopted by Virginia) requires a 72″ wide corridor if you have patients under moderate sedation, which I imagine is used from time to time in these facilities.

            So I’m getting a big chuckle out of all the “logic” in these arguments.

        • speonjosh

          Unless you are already in business. Doing the remodeling would likely force most clinics out of business.

          • Clarendon Cruiser

            Or you can just move into a real medical clinic, Like death is a constant business for an undertaker, I’m sure performing abortions has a constant supply of patients.

          • Drew

            That’s a good point. Medical office space is turning over all the time, and new buildings for medical offices are always being built. No reason one of these offices should not occupy modern medical space just like any other type of clinic.

        • drax

          What is their purpose? Were they necessary? Why? Are they an industry or medical standard? Were there incidents in clinics that made them necessary?

          Nobody is fooled by this.

    • Clarendon Cruiser

      Nice monograph here provides a great background on the issue and its constitutionality from a Ph’d candidate at William and Mary. Good read:

      http://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1335&context=wmjowl

    • Max

      Abortion is a lot safer than most medical procedures, including giving birth.

      • novasteve

        I’m sure the 100% fetal death rate, they probably wo uldn’t agree with you. if you look at my MD link, you’ll see that abortion clinics are being closed due to the safety infractions.

  • Wayne Kubicki

    Peter – leaving motives aside for the moment, can you offer any statistics as to how many abortion clinics have actually been forced to close as a result of the 2011 law?

    • drax

      It’s only been in force a year – give the overbearing regulations time to work.

      Maybe Cooch could turn the job over to the liberals, who know how to overregulate. What do you think, steve?

    • Clarendon Cruiser

      From what I found 20 Clinics in VA must adhere to the new regulations. I could not find when they had to adhere by.

    • Jake

      This was the same lame fear mongering the bars did before the smoking ban. “Oh, we will be put out of businesses. oh heavens to Betsy!”

      • novasteve

        In blue collar areas, it did put bars out of business. Pubs in the UK are dying out. Thing is, you have a choice to enter a bar or not. You are an adult. What choice does a fetus have when it’s life is about to be ended because it is inconvenient?

  • novasteve

    Has Peter even read the Handmaid’s tale? It’s not the republicans who want the government to take over every aspect of people’s lives. So Cuccinelli will establish state run birth houses where a state official will impregnate women? Will we have to learn latin as well to understand the “don’t let the bastards get you” thing? Sorry, it’s been a while since I’ve read teh book, but at least I have some recollection of it, unlike you.

    • malaka

      I hate to break it to you but your fantasy bookworld is no substitue for political reality Seteve-o

      • novasteve

        I’m not the one who brought up the Handmaid’s Tale, Malaka. The author did. Now has he actually read the book?

    • drax

      Nice try, steve.

  • SomeGuy

    I have no issue with Peter’s desire to keep abortion available to Virginians. I just think the “set women back 60 years” to “domestic servitude” references are a sleazy and pandering way to deliver it.

    • No handmaiden

      You wouldn’t feel that way if you were female. I applaud Peter.

      • novasteve

        So not being able to use abortion as birth control if Cuccinelli had is way is setting women back? And 60 years?

        • JustAThought

          I would moreso say that taking away the option for women to choose sets society as a whole back. And at least 40 years to Roe v. Wade.

          • IndependentWoman

            So continuing to withhold the option for both men and women to live moves society forward. Makes sense…..

      • SomeGuy

        Excellent point! Whereas I usually have a very logical and reasoned opinion of how to position an argument for persuasive effect, my lack of female genitalia precludes me from applying it in this instance.

    • Atticus Fisticuffs

      I have no issue with people holding opinions…even wrong ones. However, this guy is an Ailinskyite spewing fear mongering techniques filled with ridiculous hyperbole.

      • ARL

        Have you tested that notion with any females? I have a suspicion you’re male.

        • Relevance

          Relevance?

        • Atticus Fisticuffs

          What does me testing women have to do with the fact that his opinion piece is chock full of hyperbole and fear mongering? I love how no male can hold an opinion on matters such as these…and neither can women whom disagree with the views of the left…there is only one correct stance on matters relating to women and minorities!! The Left’s! ridiculous

          • ARL

            You can hold whatever opinion you want. I’m just saying a female might disagree that it’s hyperbole, because it’s alot more real for them. I suggest you, like, ask one and see what they think.

            I didn’t say you can’t hold an opinion. Calm down and take your “liberals!” rant elsewhere.

          • novasteve

            Views that are different from ours are not welcome in Arlington! We are so tolerant!

          • ARL

            This act is incredibly old, steve.

            You can have whatever opinion you want. I was just asking what a woman might think of it.

          • Atticus Fisticuffs

            Contrary to what you may think I have spoken to many womenz on this issue amongst many others. Dont act like it isn’t the party line to question any man’s opinion on the matter, based on the belief that men have no place in the argument solely because they have a penis and not a vagina. The fact is that his statement are hyperbole. Insinuating that women will be sent back to the kitchen and forced to just cook, clean, and raise babies whilst bringing their husband a beer and then servicing his manly needs is ridiculous.

  • NotMyTable

    The Cooch would be a major setback form ALL Virginians, not just women. He’s been running for “the Next Job” since he took office.

    • Atticus Fisticuffs

      Oh please please inform us as to how carpet bagger campaign manager McCaullife would be good for anyone.

      • LivedheretwentyONEyears

        Clearly someone who has lived in the commonwealth for what, 20 years, does not deserve votes of Novans.
        wait, what?

      • drax

        So you’re admitting Cooch is bad?

    • Moof

      When you’re facing the wrong way, walking backwards is actually the way forward.

      • awesomepossum

        Yeah, if you want to forever walk backwards. The solution is to turn around, dude.

  • novasteve

    Just because of the typical leftist tactic of scaring based upon their dishonest portrayals of people who don’t agree with them politically, this will just motivate me to make even more of an effort to vote for him.

    • iiandyiiii

      I believe you are mistaken and what you describe is far more common on the other side. What a surprise.

      • novasteve

        Escuse me, but the entire “war on women” thing is a complete lie. They say republicans are going to ban birth control, they support violence against women, think women should get paid less, etc.. Completely and total rubbish.

        • ARL

          Another steve straw man.

      • drax

        Wait– steve only sees the flaws in one ideology, but not the same ones in his own?

  • Lars Jones

    This type of content, from the left or the right, is not what ArlNow needs. There are many places to go on the Internet to read about ideological political issues. And leaving aside that so much of it (on the left and the right) is better written and better reasoned than this column, a bitter debate about abortion adds nothing good to this site.

    • Figsie

      If there were a “like” button, I suspect many would be hitting it.

      • Arlington Chris

        Like on Lars’ comment or on the story? If it’s the first then you can upvote ;)

      • like

        There is a “like” button–you can now up-vote comments!

    • Maitreya0208

      +1. Stick to restaurant openings and closings, and whatever the latest plan the county government has for spending money they don’t have.

    • OX4

      I’m with you, Lars. I’m definitely no fan of The Cooch, but I come to ArlNow for some light-hearted debates with locals on the merits of opening a new Froyo place. If I want partisan jabs I’ll go anywhere else on the Interwebs.

    • Arlington Chris

      I agree with you Lars. Still, it beats the “pet of the week” thing.

    • TMVA

      Wow – have you read about his opponent? ArlNow should stick to what it does best – report on local happenings. I concur with Lars Jones.

    • ARL

      Then don’t come back to this story, Lars.

    • Anne

      Arlnow please get rid of these political commentaries! And real estate advice columns and beer reviews! Well, maybe keep the beer reviews? But really, keep it real about Arlington and don’t let the pundits have a platform when what we want to really know is if the Bluemont got a bocce ball court!

  • IndependentWoman

    Really, there’s hope that we can go back to a time when women were allowed to do what we’re best at and weren’t expected to take on men’s breadwinning responsibilities in addition to everything else we already had to do? Feminism is disgusting and ignorant and I’d give almost anything to have lived in society before it. I am a woman and thanks to idiotic emotionally driven women, I’m responsible for everything in my life from having a career that completely supports me financially, managing the home I purchased alone on that salary, cooking and cleaning in it, and if I ever have kids I’ll have to add taking care of them to my responsibilities since that’s what women are expected to do in addition to everything else I have listed and more. If someone can take us back to pre-feminism society, I’ll be first in line to vote for him!

    • Beth J

      I can’t tell if you’re being serious or really, really sarcastic.

    • Arlington Chris

      You could always vote with your feet [if you are indeed serious and not sarcastic].

      Saudi-Arabia is still holding the Middle Ages in high regards.

    • OX4

      Is that you, Cooch?

  • novasteve

    This is also the same kind of tripe the democrats tried in the election. If you think that Sandra Fluke should have to pay $9 out of pocket for BC at target every month than that’s the same thing as banning birth control. That the constitution needs to be violated, otherwise paying for birth control out of pocket is like banning it. Again, I wask, why should a man have to pay a copayment for an anti cancer or heart disease medication which are actually medical problems, whereas a woman shouldn’t have to pay a copay for birth control? How is that equality? How is that not a special privilege?

    • iiandyiiii

      For one thing, because increased access and use of birth control saves money for the whole system- everyone benefits when more women use birth control.

      • novasteve

        That’s if you ignore the potential cancer and heart and stroke related complications. Doing stuff for obesity, which you would have to pay a copayment for, even for smoking cessation, you have to pay a copay, would also save money for the whole system YET the same rule doesn’t apply. So this is nothing other than pandering to a certain group that tends to vote democrat.

        • iiandyiiii

          No, the statistics take any increased risk into account- birth control saves money for everyone overall. Maybe it’s a pander, but it really does save money on health care overall.

          • novasteve

            And not charging a copay for medications/treatments for obese people would save a lot more money using your argument, but they don’t do that. This is nothing but PANDERING.

          • http://twitter.com/Dezlboy Dezlboy

            novasteve, sounds like your endorsing this plan that Nixon (R) tried to implement. He wanted to combine a mandate, which would require that employers cover their workers, with a Medicaid-like program for poor families, which all Americans would be able to join by paying sliding-scale premiums based on their income.

      • Moof

        wait, how does everyone benefit?

    • drax

      If a woman has a job with benefits, she should get them. They are hers. The government may not keep her from using them as she sees fit.

      And birth control is for a woman and her husband/partner, not just her.

  • Maitreya0208

    Nothing says “Serious Criticism” like a citation of “The Handmaids Tale”. Yawn.

  • iiandyiiii

    I won’t exactly be excited about voting for the slimy McAuliffe, but there’s few politicians I wouldn’t vote for over the anti-science, anti-bodily-autonomy, pro-discrimination-against-gays, birther-curious, conspiracy-nut, religious-nut, Cuccinelli. He just represents the very worst of the Republican party, and IMO the worst of American politics.

    • novasteve

      So would you vote for someone like Bloomberg who doesn’t even trust you with the decision to purchase soda? no republican comes close to the control freakery that liberals in power are doing. In san francisco the liberals won’t even let you purchase a working toilet or a pet in a pet store. They tried to ban happy meals. THey ban everything they don’t approve of because they think they know what’s best. At least there’s a moral argument to be made against abortion as a form of birth control.

      • iiandyiiii

        I’d easily choose Bloomberg over Cuccinelli- the soda thing is stupid but I agree with Bloomberg far more than I do with Cooch. I can’t vote for a nut like Cooch.

        • novasteve

          Are you an adult or a child? Bloomberg treates citizens like theyare subjects. Thus children. HE bans everything he doesn’t approve of because he thinks he knows best for you. Do you even know the stuff bloomberg does? He’s a completely narcissistic control freak.

          • iiandyiiii

            I think Cooch is the freak- and at least Bloomberg (and McAulliffe) isn’t a birther-curious, anti-science, conspiracy-promoting religious net.

          • iiandyiiii

            Nut, not net.

          • drax

            I’d say someone who wants to control women’s reproductive decisions is more a control freak.

          • Call it both ways

            Or the person who kills the heartbeat of the live embryo is a control freak

          • novasteve

            If in the case of it as a form of birth control. I don’t appose all abortion. If you were raped, you have the right to be put in the position you were before as much as possible. If your life is in danger in danger. But so kill your own offspring because it’s an inconvenience, that’s extremely selfish and control freakish. Remember San Francisco was poised to ban circumcision until their counsel told the city how much it would cost in legal expenses for their first amendment violation.

          • ARL

            Steve, you have NO right to tell someone WHY they should abort. THAT is YOU being a control freak. And it’s absurd that you can’t see that.

            And since you’re fine with abortion sometimes, that makes you even more of a control freak.

          • novasteve

            So if someone who is 8 months pregnant who just doesn’t feel like having a kid, should be able to do whatever the heck they want? And nobody else should be allowed to have opinions? Given potential members of society are impacted and KILLED becaus they are inconvenient, it’s really selfish, I mean beyond that, sociopathic, to think others shouldn’t be allowed opinions on the issue. EVery abortion results in a death.

          • Brenda

            I regret not having an abortion.

          • ARL

            Steve, do abortions of pregnancies from rape or incest result in death too? Yes? Then why do YOU approve of them?

      • ARL

        Let’s see, soda, my most fundamental, personal reproductive decisions, soda, my most fundamental, personal reproductive decisions. Which to pick? Such a hard decision.

        And Bloomberg isn’t even running in Virginia!

        • novasteve

          Do you have abortions every day, weekly? So it’s okay for the government to micromanage my daily life so you get to have abortions a couple times in your life? Great trade off. PS. Why should the child suffer for the choices of the parents? I’m taking non rape here. If you voluntarily have sex, knowing that pregnancy is a possible consequences, you think it’s a fundamental right for that offspring to be killed because it’s inconvenient?

          • ARL

            You are so incredibly illogical. Here’s a list of your inconsistencies:

            1. There is no trade off here. We don’t have to choose between regulating sodas and abortion. We can do both, or neither, or just one. Bloomberg isn’t running for Va. governor.

            2. A choice that may happen rarely doesn’t make it less important. I care alot more about an abortion choice than a soda choice, even though the soda choice happens more often.

            And the kicker:

            3. You claim abortion is killing a child, yet you are perfectly happy to let a child of rape be killed. You don’t want a child to suffer from the choices of parents, but you’re fine killing a child and letting it suffer the choices of a rapist.

    • confused

      what actually has McAuliffe done thats so slimey? I keep hearing this, but with no details. Is it guilt by association with Clinton?

      • iiandyiiii

        It’s more an impression I get of him. Maybe it’s not his fault, but he’s one of the least-authentic sounding people I’ve ever heard- every word seems fake to me.

        • The Bible

          I feel the exact same way.

      • Mary-Austin

        He’s trying to pass himself off as a businessman that creates jobs in Virginia when he actually has been a hyper partisan political operative for most of his career.

      • drax

        For me it’s what he hasn’t done.

        He raised money for Clinton. Wow. What makes him qualified to be governor?

  • Bennett

    Trying to be the same sort of hack as the Republican writing these columns. For a while there, you were educating about Arlington government. Now you’re just flacking.

  • Mary-Austin

    Yep…Cuccinelli sucks but unfortunately so does Terry McAuliffe. If Republicans were smart they would have run Bill Bolling.

  • ArlAnon

    Is ArlNow a forum for the few Arlington Republicans to get together and trash all things Arlington / democrat / liberal? Sure seems like it. I’m glad they have some place to chitchat anyway. Must get lonely here otherwise.

  • Lucifer

    Yes, many folk including Peter have addressed these social issues. These issues clearly define Cuccinelli’s opinion and probably what he would try to do as governor. There are many different opinions voiced here. Should actions be based upon a woman’s right to choose; not what some armchair pundit thinks?

    However, consider for a moment what is another defining difference being decided by this election. NOVA and Hampton Roads are well off with low unemployment. Both will feel the effects of sequestration. However, much of the rest of Virginia suffers from high unemployment. We need to focus on jobs for the existing work force and even more important preparing our children to capably compete for a decent livelihood with competition being more and more global.

  • Jeff

    Typically, I align closer with Republican fiscal policies (and related policies around entitlement programs), but tend to align closer to the democratic party for other social issues such as abortion and marriage equality. In this case, I am pro-choice. That being said, I do understand and respect where most Republicans are coming from, but perhaps for a different reason that most Republicans would use to defend their argument. At some point during the development of a fetus, it becomes a “person.” This bill defines it at the moment of conception, which may be a little overboard. I completely understand and support some definition of when the fetus can be considered a person – but not some arbitrary time period. I often see once you hit the third trimester, it is now “too late.” Isn’t that a fairly arbitrary date? In normal circumstances (e.g. ignoring situations where the mother’s health may be in jeopardy), I think nearly everyone would agree 8.5 months is too late to have an abortion. I’ve seen using a “detectable heartbeat” (again, in “normal” circumstances) as one suggestion for when abortions should no longer be an option. While the “heartbeat” argument may be fairly early on, at least it is tied to something that is clearly defined and measurable, rather than an arbitrary point in time during the pregnancy.

  • granny

    I am 83 and remember very well 60 years ago and it was grim. If your birth control method didn’t work it was suck it up and give up any career you were going to have because there wasn’t any child care sharing in those days. I don’t think that politicians should have any say over my body. I don’t think this guys religious convictions should be forced on the rest of us.

    • novasteve

      Unless you were raped, don’t you have any responsibility in how you got pregnant, and why should someone else pay with their life because you don’t want to be inconvienienced over your VOLUNTARY actions?

      • ARL

        Hey, steve – great argument for banning treatment for lung cancer and the other long list of ailments caused by the VOLUNTARY action of smoking.

        Or for the many diseases caused by the VOLUNTARY action of eating poorly and not exercising.

        Etc.

        • novasteve

          And for banning certain practices that transmit HIV. However getting pregnant isn’t an illness. So if you’re going to compare pregnancy to cancer or heart disease, that doesn’t reflect poorly on me, but on you?

  • novasteve

    Liberal MD is closing down abortion clinics due to not meeting regulations/safety… The same state that has same sex marriage, gives in state tuition to illegal aliens, just got rid of the death penalty, is about to pass a state wide bag tax, more gun restrictions.

    http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-03-12/health/bs-hs-abortion-clinic-suspension-20130308_1_abortion-clinics-clinics-face-surgical-abortion-procedures

  • novasteve
    • ARL

      How would Virginia’s new regulations have prevented this? Be specific.

  • Let_Them_Eat_Cake

    I am reminded the cartoon I recently read wherein an elementary teacher asks how the second civil war started…that’s when a lone child raises her hand and says MSNBC and Fox News.

    I don’t know why Arlnow is having these jokers on the site. Honestly, I have my mind made up as do most folks on this site. Its incendiary and for what?

    • speonjosh

      I think public debate goes back a few years, like to the Greeks or something like that. I could be wrong.
      I think it is a mistake to say that my mind is made up and so therefore I don’t need to listen to any further conversation on a given subject. There is always the possibility that I am wrong.

    • anonymous

      “Second civil war”? I’ve read British historians describe the revolutionary war as the first American civil war, but that’s a generally unpopular concept over here.

  • KJ

    I a) agree with Lars and b) will be writing in a name for “Guv”. Not so desperate on gubernatorial candidates that I’ll move to MD, though…

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