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by Nick Anderson — September 12, 2014 at 2:30 pm 0

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Editor’s Note: This sponsored column is written by Nick Anderson, beermonger at Arrowine (4508 Lee Highway).

Over the past two weeks, I’ve recapped my visits to two Southern California breweries — Stone and The Bruery — that I went on during my recent vacation. Today we’re wrapping everything up with a list of some of the things I noticed during my too-brief stay out West:

Good: Los Angeles’ local beer scene: I expected to find all kinds of good beer in San Diego and was not disappointed, but what surprised me was how many breweries are up and running in L.A. itself. During an afternoon trip to the beach at Santa Monica, my wife and I ducked into The Commons Ale House, a small beer bar just off the beach focusing on craft beer with some great local options on tap. Over games of Connect Four, we got to try Angel City‘s Eureaka! Wit (4.9 percent and made with Nelson Sauvin? Yes, please!), and El Segundo Brewery‘s Blue House Mosaic Pale Ale. El Segundo makes a handful of Blue House Pales featuring different hops. I noticed some Blue House Citra at a Whole Foods near my friend’s house later on in the week, along with a number of other L.A.-based brewery selections. Reading a Brewing News-style periodical about the L.A. beer scene, it appears that there are more breweries coming online, which is always a good sign.

Bad: Hop-centric, sometimes to a fault: What I found in SoCal was a dearth of the Lagers, non-hoppy Ales (Kolsch-style, Golden Ales, etc.), wheat beers, and mild Belgian styles that are more readily found here on the East Coast. For the most part, I was fine with this — I got into beer as a hophead, and I’m always going to be one. For people like my wife, the emphasis on big hops in nearly everything being put out by craft brewers can be tough to deal with.

My wife, you see, is not a fan of particularly bitter hoppy beers. Over the 10 years we’ve been together, she’s tried more beers than most people in the industry, and she has a great palate — she knows what she likes, and knows what she doesn’t. Too often in California we’d look through a menu at beer lists and there just wouldn’t be much of anything that she could get into.

Good: That may be changing? All that said, I did see some signs that things might be shifting a bit on the West Coast. The aforementioned Angel City Brewery offers their Wit year-round, along with a year-round Pilsner, and seasonals like a Wheat Ale and Oktoberfest. Modern Times offers a Saison and Coffee Stout that, while relatively hoppy for their styles by the numbers (30 and 40 IBU, respectively), aren’t overly aggressive. AleSmith‘s Anvil ESB was a beer we both loved. Even during our Stone visit, my wife found herself enjoying Go-To IPA (no bittering hops, remember?) and loved the limited-release Sprocketbier from earlier this year. I got to snag a sixer of Firestone Oaktoberfest and was impressed; hopefully production is boosted enough for next year that we see a little on the East Coast.

Good: If you do like hops, though… Oh man, is it fun being a hophead in California. The night we landed, my friend and I went on a BevMo run to stock up his fridge a bit. I decided to buy some ChronicAle from Port Brewing. I’m a fan of Port and hadn’t tried this one before. ChronicAle is a hoppy Session Amber Ale, clocking in at 4.9 percent, and comes in six-packs of tallboy cans. How cool is that? Also, those sixers of tallboys cost $9.99 at BevMo — this was the first of many moments where I contemplated staying in L.A., and never coming back. Also found and enjoyed while in California: Firestone 805 (in six-pack bottles and 12-pack cans), AleSmith IPA and Pale Ale 394, Stone Bastard In The Rye, Beechwood Alpha Master, Ritual Single Rye IPA… there’s a lot of great beer in SoCal, y’all.

(more…)

by Ethan Rothstein — September 12, 2014 at 1:30 pm 2,997 0

(Updated at 1:45 p.m.) Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) says he “had to stand up for Arlington” this morning in his office with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) who rankled folks in Arlington over the line in her book calling the county a “soulless suburb.”

Warner wrote in a tweet “All is forgiven” and thanked Gillibrand for “being a class act.” He posted three photos, including one of him and Gillibrand holding an “Arlington, We Got Soul” T-shirt.

“Senator Gillibrand says she meant no offense,” Warner told ARLnow.com in an email, “and she certainly was a good sport about the whole thing.”

Warner Press Secretary Beth Wanamaker said Gillibrand came into their office “and was immediately apologetic to all of us. She said she had no idea that she would cause such a kerfuffle.”

The shirt is produced by Fairfax-based CustomInk, and it can be bought online here for $20 each. All of the funds from T-shirt purchases will go directly to the Arlington Food Assistance Center, per the T-shirt seller’s website.

Photos courtesy Sen. Mark Warner’s office

by Ethan Rothstein — September 12, 2014 at 12:00 pm 577 0

As our Just Listed columnist wrote, “helloooo inventory.” There is plenty of variety among the real estate listings this week, including a two-bedroom condo right off Lee Highway and a $2.2 million house in Woodmont.

See our real estate section for a full listing of open houses. Here are a few highlights:

2030-n-woodrow-street2030 N. Woodrow Street
2 BD / 1 BA condominium
Agent: Eric Hernandez, Keller Williams Realty
Listed: $240,000
Open: Sunday, Sept. 14, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

4638-31st-road-s4638 31st Road S.
1 BD / 2 BA condominium
Agent: Margaret Baldwin, Long & Foster Real Estate
Listed: $372,500
Open: Sunday, Sept. 14, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

1732-s-fillmore-street1732 S. Fillmore Street
4 BD / 3 BA single family detached
Agent: Joyce Becker, Weichert, Realtors
Listed: $589,000
Open: Sunday, Sept. 14, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

1713-n-edison-street1713 N. Edison Street
5 BD / 3 BA single family detached
Agent: Keri Shull, Keller Williams Realty
Listed: $749,900
Open: Sunday, Sept. 14, 2:00-4:00 p.m.

2422-13th-court-n2422 13th Court N.
3 BD / 3 1/2 BA townhouse
Agent: Ruth Boyer, American Realty Group
Listed: $949,000
Open: Saturday, Sept. 13, 1:00-4:00 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 14, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

2608-24th-street-n2608 24th Street N.
5 BD / 5 1/2 BA single family detached
Agent: Kevin Love, Re/Max Allegiance
Listed: $2,199,000
Open: Sunday, Sept. 14, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

by Ethan Rothstein — September 12, 2014 at 11:00 am 673 0

Nancy Van DorenNancy Van Doren is the newest member of the Arlington County School Board after the Board appointed her in a special meeting this morning.

Van Doren replaces Noah Simon on the Board and will serve her interim turn until the Nov. 4 general election. Van Doren is running unopposed for the seat in the election, and she will be sworn in for her full, four-year term after she wins. Simon resigned this summer to take care of his children after his wife died on Dec. 30, 2013.

Van Doren will fill one of two open seats on the Board. Former Board member Sally Baird also resigned this summer; Barbara Kanninen and Audrey Clement are running to replace her in the Nov. 4 election. Baird originally had announced she wouldn’t seek re-election but would serve out her current term, but changed course and resigned on Aug. 22.

“Nancy is a well-regarded civic leader who has supported the Arlington Public Schools for a decade,” School Board Chair James Lander said in a press release. “Nancy has been highly engaged and is well-informed about the many complexities associated with Arlington’s needs. She will make a tremendous addition to this Board.”

After the jump, the full release from Arlington Public Schools on Van Doren’s appointment: (more…)

by Andrea Swalec — September 12, 2014 at 10:00 am 1,161 0

Arlington Career Center students train to be cosmetologists (via Arlington Career Center).Getting a hair cut or your nails done in one of the most expensive areas in the country doesn’t have to cost a fortune — Arlington cosmetology schools offer low-cost services under professional supervision.

High school students at Arlington Career Center provide spa services as they prepare to pass the state exam to become licensed beauticians.

“The students do the work and it’s overseen by two cosmetology teachers,” instructor Rosenia Peake said.

A blowout costs $15, a haircut costs $10 and senior citizens get a 10 percent discount. Appointments at 816 S. Walter Reed Dr. are scheduled for 8 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and 1:45 p.m. and can be made by calling (703) 228-5799.

Students aren’t giving manicures now but will be later this year, said Peake, who noted the Arlington Public Schools-run program gets teenagers job-ready.

“You’re a professional in the 11th grade, and you haven’t even graduated from high school,” she said. “This is a stepping stone to another life.”

ACC principal Margaret Chung said the program serves both locals and students.

“It’s an incredible opportunity for our students to be able to give back to the community,” she said. “Students get hands-on experience and learn to interact in a professional way.”

For a little more money, Graham Webb Academy offers more extensive salon services in Rosslyn. At 1621 N. Kent St., student stylists give haircuts ($19), blowouts ($14), full highlights ($57) and more, according to their website. A manicure there costs $12, and a Brazilian Blowout runs $175.

Appointments can be made by calling (703) 243-9322 and walk-ins are available.

In Virginia Square, Kenny’s Beauty Academy advertises women’s haircuts for $15, men’s haircuts for $10 and manicures for $10. A Brazilian keratin treatment there costs $100, the school’s website says. The 3461 Washington Blvd. school can be reached at (571) 522-4566.

Photo via Arlington Career Center

by ARLnow.com — September 12, 2014 at 9:30 am 673 0

Helicopter over the Potomac and Rosslyn (photo courtesy Peter Roof / Alt Gobo MediaWorks LLC)

USS Arlington Remembers 9/11 — The crew of the USS Arlington marked the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks while at sea in the Atlantic Ocean yesterday. The sailors and Marines aboard the ship, named in remembrance of the attack on the Pentagon, participated in a solemn ceremony to honor the 184 people who died in that attack. [DVIDS]

Travel Tips for Crystal City Wine Fest — Arlington County has car-free travel tips for those who will be attending Sunday’s Vintage Crystal Sip and Salsa festival in Crystal City. There are numerous rail lines, bus stops and Capital Bikeshare stations near the food and wine tasting event, which is taking place from 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the parking lot behind 220 20th Street S. [Car-Free Diet]

Renovated Sheraton Now a Westin — The former Sheraton hotel at 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway in Crystal City has undergone a $20 million renovation and has now reopened as the Westin Crystal City. The hotel has “220 luxurious guest rooms and extensive meeting facilities.” [eTurbo News]

Arlington Taking Neighborhood College Apps — Arlington County is accepting applications for its Neighborhood College program through Sept. 29. The eight-week “civic engagement and leadership development program” teaches students “how to advocate for your neighborhood and effect change.” [Arlington County]

Photo courtesy Peter Roof / Alt Gobo MediaWorks LLC

Just Listed in Arlington

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — September 12, 2014 at 5:00 am 605 0

Just Listed banner

Just Listed highlights Arlington properties that just came on the market within the past week. This feature is written and sponsored by Team Cathell, “Your Orange Line Specialists.”

Hellooooo inventory! This week unleashed a torrent of fresh new inventory totaling 105 new properties on the market ranging in price from $130,000 to nearly $4 million.

About 40 percent of that inventory is single family detached homes, and the rest is condos and townhomes. Buyers should be thrilled that finally there is fresh product to review. The market typically jumps just after Labor Day, and this year is no exception.

Buyer activity also surged this week with 65 ratified contracts with an average days on market of 36 and average sales price of $657,000. Only three of those ratified contracts were over $1 million indicating the market is still soft in the higher price brackets.

Adding to buyers’ delight is the fact that mortgage interest rates either held steady, or with some types of loans dipped just a little bit. Also good news, lenders are reporting more new loan products are now available for buyers with low down payments. The conditions appear favorable so far this fall for strong buyer activity.

You can access all active listings in Arlington on the Cathell Team website.

by ARLnow.com — September 11, 2014 at 4:15 pm 4,032 0

Police car lightsA woman was attacked by two men near Columbia Pike Monday night.

The incident, described by police as an “attempted abduction,” took place at 10:35 p.m. on the 3800 block of 12th Street S. Two men allegedly ran up to and grabbed an 18-year-old woman as she was getting into her car.

The woman fought off the attackers, who took off on foot when they spotted a police car nearby, according to the Arlington County Police Department.

From the police report:

ATTEMPTED ABDUCTION, 140908058, 3800 block of S. 12th Street. At 10:35 pm on September 8, two subjects allegedly grabbed an 18 year-old female victim from behind as she was attempting to enter her vehicle. The victim tried to fight off her attackers and sustained minor injuries. The suspects fled the scene when they observed a police vehicle in the area that was responding to a separate incident. The victim flagged police down and a K9 search was unsuccessful. Suspect one is described as a Hispanic male, between 5’5″ and 6’0″ tall and had two stripes shaved into his hair near his temple. Suspect two is described as a Hispanic male, between 5’5″ and 6’0″ tall. He was wearing dark clothing at the time of the incident.

by Mark Kelly — September 11, 2014 at 3:45 pm 522 0

The Right Note is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Mark KellyMy story of Sept. 11 was in no way heroic or unique. But, like most Arlingtonians who lived here that day, it is still vividly etched in my mind.

My wife and I boarded a plane bound for Washington early on the morning of Sept. 11 after spending a long weekend in Florida. Little did I know that hundreds of my fellow Americans were doing the same, but they would never land safely back on the ground.

When our wheels touched down at Reagan National that morning, the first plane had struck the World Trade Center in New York. As we deplaned and went to catch a cab to the office on Capitol Hill, the second plane struck the second tower.

Capitol Hill was buzzing with the news when we arrived. Soon, I learned of what had happened in New York, and like so many of us watched the television in disbelief.

Not long after arriving at my office just across the street from the Capitol, there were reports of an explosion at the Pentagon which turned out to be terrorists flying American Airlines Flight #77 into the building. My wife looked at me with tears in her eyes and said, “they are coming here next.”

As we evacuated our office, the beautiful blue sky was soon filled with the sounds of fighter jets that had been scrambled to DC as well as black smoke billowing from the Pentagon.

When we learned later that United Airlines Flight #93 had gone down in Pennsylvania, we had no doubt that it was en route back to the Washington area. I cannot help but think that those passengers may have saved my life.

A few hours later, we caught a ride with a friend back across the Potomac to our condo in Pentagon City. The next morning, a thin layer of soot covered my car and the smell of smoke still lingered in the air. It was a chilling reminder of what had happened and the loss so many families were feeling just 24 hours after starting their Tuesday like normal.

The hill beside our building became a makeshift memorial, as people would gather each evening to look down on the Pentagon and the huge American flag draped near the devastation that took place there. People would gather, watch, cry and pray.

Thirteen years ago we were attacked because we were Americans. In the attacks, 2,977 died and thousands more were injured. In response, we saw America rally in remarkable ways as a nation.

When we visit the Pentagon Memorial or when I drive by the piece of steel from ground zero at Arlington County Fire Station 5, I remember. I do not know how we will commemorate Sept. 11 50 years from now, but I know it will still be worth remembering.

Mark Kelly is a former Arlington GOP Chairman and two-time Republican candidate for Arlington County Board.

by Larry Roberts — September 11, 2014 at 3:15 pm 505 0

Progressive Voice is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Larry RobertsOn Sept. 11, 2001, I was an attorney working with a law firm in offices a few blocks from the White House. I also was serving as Chair of the Arlington County Democratic Committee.

At the end of that tragic day, I prepared an email to Arlington Democrats describing my thoughts about that day and how we might respond to the tragedy.

Each year on the anniversary of the tragedy, I look back on that email to remember what I felt at the time. I remain proud of my words that day:

Dear Arlington Democrats,

Our nation has endured a vicious attack directed at symbols of its financial and military might. The attackers succeeded in destroying the World Trade Center, damaging the Pentagon, and bringing grief to countless families, friends and colleagues of the victims of the attack. The attackers failed miserably, however, in their primary objective — destroying the very fabric of our democratic society.

We have shown our ability as a nation and as Americans to face up to catastrophic circumstances and respond with the best we have to offer.

People gave up their lives to help others to survive. Countless Americans donated blood, food, and other needed supplies. Schoolteachers and administrators kept a sense of calm in our schools and among our children. Journalism rose to meet the challenge of keeping us informed with factual information and avoiding speculation and sensationalism. Our public officials provided the necessary and appropriate leadership and words of comfort.

Leaving the District and returning to Arlington by Metro, I was struck by the poignant conversations of people coming to grips with a tragedy that had struck too close to home. Everyone was calm, respectful of those around them, and purposeful.

As I left the Rosslyn Metro station and walked to the Courthouse area, cars made their way in an orderly way along Wilson Boulevard. Arlington’s diversity was reflected among the many, many people who walked along the same road to their residences. The sense was that we were all Americans — no matter our race, ethnicity or religion — and that we all were preparing ourselves for the challenges ahead without the hysteria and scapegoating that can accompany such trying times.

As I returned home, I saw on television the dramatic footage of what was taking place at the Pentagon and the Virginia Hospital Center — Arlington. I was proud that our Arlington emergency personnel (police, fire and rescue), our Arlington health care providers, and our County government had responded so quickly, persistently, and effectively to what was a situation of national and international importance. We saw the leaders of our state, region and nation rise to the occasion.

I think our political and civic leaders made the right choice in canceling activities and campaigning yesterday and last night. That was a time to focus on the situation at hand and to put aside our partisan differences.

As we know, life must go on. Were it not to go on with some semblance of normalcy, the terrorists would be victorious. They will not achieve such a victory.

Still, each of us must come to grips with these extraordinary events in our own way and in our own time. For some of us, there will be losses to deal with that are personal and severe. Others of us will be ready to get back to the campaign trail as soon as possible — perhaps as a way to reach out for comfort from friends in our Arlington Democratic family.

Let us respect those who need some time off and let us also respect those who are ready to get back to the business of electing our leaders of tomorrow.

As campaigners, let us be sure to respect the sensitivities of those of our Arlington residents who choose not to focus on the campaign just yet.

As these events unfold, we will once again see the importance of those who serve as our leaders, and the importance of electing leaders who appeal to and serve our better instincts and values.

That is why it is so important for us to engage in the electoral process and to work together as Arlington Democrats.

I look forward to seeing all of you soon. Take care and keep in our thoughts and prayers those who are helping others, who are leading us, who are in need, who are grieving, and who have lost their lives.

Larry Roberts is an attorney in private practice and served as Counselor to Governor Tim Kaine. On September 11, 2001, he was Chair of the Arlington County Democratic Committee.

by Peter Rousselot — September 11, 2014 at 2:45 pm 592 0

Peter’s Take is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Peter RousselotLast week, a jury rendered its guilty verdict in the trial of former Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife Maureen. The jury found the McDonnells guilty of multiple violations of federal criminal law relating to public corruption.

The jury answered decisively the question I raised in an Aug. 7 column: a crush does NOT excuse a crime.

Most legal experts and political observers agree that Virginia’s state criminal laws on public corruption are so full of holes that the McDonnells could not have been successfully prosecuted under those state laws. Far from discouraging corrupt conduct, Virginia’s porous state laws enable it.

Any tightening of Virginia’s criminal laws on public corruption must be done at the state level. Under Virginia’s Dillon Rule,” individual localities like Arlington cannot adopt ordinances that conflict with current state criminal law. But, that does not mean that Arlington has no room to act on its own.

For example, earlier this year the Arlington School Board adopted a new gifts policy. Under the School Board’s new policy:

Employees may accept gifts valued at a total of $100.00 or less during a school year from any one student, individual, family or organization, including PTAs and Booster organizations. In no instance shall an employee accept a gift given for services performed within the scope of the employee’s duties or given with the intent to influence an employee’s actions. Any single gift valued at more than $100.00, or gifts totaling more than $100.00 from one giver during the course of a year, must be returned to the giver.

I commend the School Board for the positive example it set by taking this action. As I have written previously, now it’s time for the County Board to step up to the plate.

The current County Board Ethics Policy is much too vague and weak. On the subject of gifts, for example, the current County Board policy simply urges its employees to “ensure that no favors, gifts, gratuities or benefits are received for actions taken.” This provision simply urges County employees not to violate the toothless provisions of current Virginia state criminal law.

The County Board can and should do much better.

To get started, the County Board should follow the lead of the School Board and adopt a gifts policy. Emulating the School Board, the County Board ought to adopt a $100 limit on gifts.

It’s time for the County Board to send a strong signal that it is committed to the highest ethical standards.

Peter Rousselot is a former member of the Central Committee of the Democratic Party of Virginia and former chair of the Arlington County Democratic Committee.

by Ethan Rothstein — September 11, 2014 at 1:50 pm 8,024 0

Bikram Arlington 9/11 Tweets (Screenshot via @Cameron_Gray)

(Updated at 2:05 p.m.) A Ballston hot yoga studio sparked outrage Thursday by promoting a Sept. 11-themed sale and referencing conspiracy theories.

“9+11 = 20% OFF! PATRIOT DAY SALE on Bikram Yoga,” Bikram Arlington, located four miles from the Pentagon at 4509 5th Road N., tweeted Thursday morning.

Twitter users told the company they were appalled by the reference to the tragedy.

“Kind of disgusting to promote shop sales with a Sept. 11 discount. Shame on you, @bikramarlington,” user @Melissaeweiss wrote.

Courthouse resident Angela Herrick, 32, said a Facebook post from the yoga studio about the sale appeared alongside a post remembering her friend’s father, who was killed in the Pentagon.

“A tragedy like this should never be used to promote a business, period,” Herrick told ARLnow.com, noting she had frequented the studio since 2011. “I will not be returning, ever.”

Bikram Arlington then tweeted, “The goal was to point out what date it was and associate to patriotism and to remember it. Its [sic] a shame some of you go to the negative.”

“Apologies to anyone who is upset by it!” another tweet from the company said.

That tweet was was quickly followed by a suggestion to search 9/11 “truther” conspiracy theories.

“If you want to be upset, research the term ’911 building 7′ and check the news because they are hearing ‘chatter’ about us getting hit again.”

The studio’s promotion page added more color on the deal: “Freedom Isn’t Free — And we intend to honor those patriots who have died for our country and morn [sic] the loss of freedom of speech and other rights that died day.”

Studio owner Zahra Vaezi, whose husband, Frank, wrote the tweet, told The Washington Post that she “didn’t realize people would be so ‘roar,’ you know?” over the promotion.

“It’s like that man who punched his wife,” she told the Post, referring to ex-Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice. “I mean, that’s upsetting. But I think it kind of gets blown out of proportion.”

Multiple calls to the studio went unreturned.

by Ethan Rothstein — September 11, 2014 at 1:00 pm 847 0

Two drivers were involved in a head-on collision this morning on S. Carlin Springs Road, closing down the northbound lanes for about an hour.

A Toyota Corolla and Ford station wagon collided when, according to the driver of the Corolla, the station wagon started to turn left into Long Branch Nature Center, crossing into her lane before she could brake. The crash occurred at about 11:00 a.m.

An ambulance arrived on the scene but both drivers refused medical attention. The Corolla driver, who declined to give her name and was visibly shaken up, suffered only a minor abrasion on her chin. Both airbags in her car deployed.

All lanes of S. Carlin Springs Road have since reopened.

by Andrea Swalec — September 11, 2014 at 12:00 pm 484 0

Sen. Tim Kaine promoted career and technical education Sept. 10, 2014 at a panel discussion held at the Capitol.Eliminating the stigma against technical education will help young Virginians get better jobs, Sen. Tim Kaine said at a panel discussion Wednesday afternoon at the Capitol, where two Arlington teachers spoke about their successes in the field.

Young people can get better-paying jobs if the perception of high school job-skills courses is changed from an option for failing students to a smart choice, Kaine said. The discussion was held by the national education coalition Advocates for Literacy and the Senate Career and Technical Education Caucus, of which Kaine is co-chair.

“This big-picture goal which our caucus is related to is de-stigmatizing [career and technical education] and making it really hot, sexy and cool,” he said. “Technical education is coming back strong and it’s something we can celebrate.”

Jeffrey Elkner and Sean Kinnard, both teachers at the Arlington Public Schools-run Arlington Career Center, described how giving youth practical skills motivates them.

“Students who would be turned off otherwise make real-world connections,” said Elkner, who teaches math and information technology at the career center. Located at 816 S. Walter Reed Drive, the school trains more than 1,100 students a day in programs including animal science, cosmetology and automotive technology.Arlington Career Center teachers Sean Kinnard, left, and Jeffrey Elkner spoke at the Capitol on Sept. 10, 2014 about their successes in career and technical education.

Kinnard spoke about a teen from Afghanistan who was disengaged in ordinary high school classes but had a passion for cars. After participating in the school’s two-year auto tech program, the teen now works for a Mercedes dealer.

“The program got him the industry credentials he needed to get his job,” said Kinnard, who teaches English as a Second Language.

Kaine described a disconnect between job seekers’ skills and the positions available.

“There’s a mismatch right now between the unemployment rate and positions going unfilled, and what that means is we’re not training people in the right skills,” he said. “[Career and technical education] is probably the best thing you can do to realign that so the skills match up with the needs.”

The junior senator introduced on Wednesday the Middle School Technical Education Program Act, which would encourage middle school students to explore technical career options and provide access to apprenticeships.

by Ethan Rothstein — September 11, 2014 at 11:15 am 451 0

Daisy (right) and Tulip (photo courtesy AWLA)With domestic violence in the news, the Animal Welfare League of Arlington is spreading the word about a program that allows those in dire situations to shelter their pets.

The nonprofit organization, located at 2650 S. Arlington Mill Drive, has a program called “Safekeeping.” The program allows pet owners in Arlington and Falls Church to shelter their pets at AWLA for up to two weeks while the owner is coping with an emergency, like domestic violence, losing a home or the owner’s death.

With the national spotlight thrust on domestic violence after video surfaced of Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice punching his then-fiancée, AWLA is hoping to remind abuse victims that their pet’s well-being could be at risk as well as their own.

“A strong connection has been documented linking animal abuse and domestic violence,” said AWLA spokeswoman Kerry McKeel. “Women often delay their decision to leave an abusive partner out of concern for the safety of their pets.”

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence reports that 83 percent of women and 63 percent of children, after having arrived at a domestic violence shelter — such as Doorways for Women and Families – reported incidents of pet abuse.

“At AWLA our steadfast mission throughout the year is to improve the lives of animals and one way in which we accomplish this objective is through our Safekeeping program,” McKeel said. “Animals often give continuity and hope during a crisis, so it is distressing for many when they feel forced to part with a pet due to their circumstance. During a crisis, pet owners often just need some short-term help to get back on their feet and that is what we offer through the Safekeeping program.”

Animals can be sheltered at AWLA for two weeks at a time, and the owners are required to check on the pet’s welfare after one week, AWLA says. There is no limit for how many times an animal can be sheltered in case of emergency. McKeel said that, since Safekeeping was launched as a service in 2005, more than 200 animals have been sheltered.

File photo courtesy AWLA

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