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Buying a Car
  • aldohexose October 22, 2013 - 8:14 pm #92167 Reply

    Don't negotiate. Tell the salesperson and sales manager that you'll sign the paperwork the minute they hit your target figure. Politely decline any counter-offers, give them  phone number, and leave. If the price you've proposed is within the realm of possibility, they'll call you at some point.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2013/07/26/what-are-some-good-tactics-to-use-to-lower-the-price-of-a-car-while-negotiating-with-a-car-sales-person/

    Sunshine October 23, 2013 - 9:30 am #92179 Reply

    “Mini-vans are out of the question...no chance.”

    What? You don’t want a used beige Toyota Sienna? I hear they come with three free used sippy cups and a pound of crushed Cheerios.  :-)

    Captain_Obvious October 23, 2013 - 9:36 am #92181 Reply

    What? You don't want a used beige Toyota Sienna? I hear they come with three free used sippy cups and a pound of crushed Cheerios.  :-)

    I don’t want to pry off the MD license plates, nor do I want to fix the gas pedal that is permanently stuck on 50MPH in the left lane on the beltway.

    nom de guerre October 23, 2013 - 9:50 am #92182 Reply

    Preservation Arlington remembers when you could find a good used car on 10th Street.

    Hank October 23, 2013 - 9:51 am #92183 Reply

    @Sunshine: Great timing… my daughter emptied her bowl of Cheerios all over the floor of our car this very morning.  And I aspire to one day have a beige Toyota Sienna… we rock a gold 2005 Accord.

    Sunshine October 23, 2013 - 10:48 am #92202 Reply

    Too funny! Sounds like you have a swagger wagon….

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql-N3F1FhW4

     

    ARLwahoo October 23, 2013 - 1:06 pm #92220 Reply

    JonBoy: I picked up finally to tell them I had bought something else. The guy proceeded to tell me I made a terrible mistake and was trying to get me to sell the car to them and buy something from them. He continued to leave chastising messages and telling me I was stupid, after which I made the legal threat. It was nuts and totally unprofessional

    newty25 October 23, 2013 - 1:56 pm #92228 Reply

    ARLwahoo… I hate to say it, but it sounds like you made a terrible mistake.

    fakenovasteve October 23, 2013 - 2:26 pm #92229 Reply

    My friend, you did not make a mistake. It is shameful that anyone would chastise you or call you stupid.

    JonBoy October 23, 2013 - 4:38 pm #92246 Reply

    ARLwahoo: Are you joking?  That’s terrible.  I wish you could tell me who; I’d never go there–not that I’m planning on buying a car anytime soon. I wish there were a PAC to which I could donate to support Tesla in their efforts to dismantle the franchise system.

    GoodOmens October 24, 2013 - 12:34 pm #92304 Reply

    Don't negotiate. Tell the salesperson and sales manager that you'll sign the paperwork the minute they hit your target figure. Politely decline any counter-offers, give them  phone number, and leave. If the price you've proposed is within the realm of possibility, they'll call you at some point.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2013/07/26/what-are-some-good-tactics-to-use-to-lower-the-price-of-a-car-while-negotiating-with-a-car-sales-person/

     

    Great advice.  I’ve had a salesmen try and pull a good cop bad cop on me once.  I had a figure in mind – salesman agreed to it.  We sit down to do the paperwork and he has to get approval for it.  Basically the manager won’t approve and gets angry at me when I point out that why is he letting salesmen offer such a price if he knows it won’t get approved.

    I refuse the counter offer, walk out and they called later that day to apologize for getting angry and go with the price I wanted.  Needless to say I didn’t buy from them.

    Another dealership gave me a price, when you added back in my trade-in and the factory rebates, that was about 1000 above MSRP.  The dealer was also selling loaner cars as “new” (which is legal) – I didn’t even bother trying to negotiate with them.

    With car buying services out there that give you a perspective of what you should be paying for a car – there is really no reason to pay MSRP unless it’s a car that can’t sit on the lot.  Do some research, figure out what a reasonable offer is, and don’t budge.  You’ll find your car but it might take some time.

    I’ll probably buy my next car from Hyundai Fairfax – I wish I can remember the name of my salesman but he was a great guy and they were easy to work with.  No BS sales tactics etc.

    ClarendonGuy October 24, 2013 - 3:30 pm #92318 Reply

    Tis a shame on both car dealers and consumers. The consumer should pay the car dealer a profit which will let them stay in business… Also the dealer should refrain from trying to put the consumer to sleep…. what to do… what to do… What is a fair profit? Do cars sold in Manhattan cost more? Should I go to Iowa to buy a car? Damn it Capitalism

     

    GoodOmens October 24, 2013 - 5:33 pm #92330 Reply

    Tis a shame on both car dealers and consumers. The consumer should pay the car dealer a profit which will let them stay in business... Also the dealer should refrain from trying to put the consumer to sleep.... what to do... what to do... What is a fair profit? Do cars sold in Manhattan cost more? Should I go to Iowa to buy a car? Damn it Capitalism

     

    It’s almost impossible to come up with a fair price. A dealer can sell below “cost” and still make a hefty profit by things such as dealer kickbacks and other obscure forms of compensation they get from manufactures.  Not to mention a ton of money is made in the financing department – “would you like the extended warranty?” etc

    I’m all for eliminating the dealer model.  Let manufactures sell direct to the public – that’s precisely what Tesla is trying to do and getting tons of resistance for.  If dealers didn’t discriminate and charged the same price to everyone I’d feel different – but they don’t.  Not saying every dealer out there is evil – but it just takes one bad apple to ruin the bunch……

    redstang423 October 30, 2013 - 2:08 pm #92702 Reply

    The biggest piece of advice is just to research online. There are enough resources online between Edmunds, KBB, and the like that you should know what a fair price is (particularly for a new car) before you even set foot in a dealership. Like others have suggested, don’t negotiate. Tell them you’re willing to pay X, and that’s that.

    I bought a Mustang from Ted Britt Ford about 6 years ago, but I had one of the guaranteed prices through my employer at the time, so no price negotiation was involved. If you own even 1 share of Ford, you can get “specialty” pricing which ends up being about what you’d pay by negotiating, but takes that hassle out. I’m sure other manufacturers are similar.

    4 years ago, I sold the Mustang (to Carmax) and bought a BMW M3. I went slightly preowned, rather than new. I tried to purchase locally, but no one would give a good price, and I actually found the local BMW dealers to be a bit snobby. The came off sort of like “well, if you need to negotiate, you clearly can’t afford it.” I ended up finding one online, called the dealer, told him what I’d pay, and he agreed. Three days later, I flew out to Chicago, and bought a nearly identical M3 to one at a local dealership’s lot (mine was different color, fewer miles, more options) for $6,000 less than the local dealer’s best offer. It was the best 10 hour drive home of my life. Two years later, I sold the car (again, locally to Carmax) for only about $4,000 less than I bought it, despite it being 3 days from falling out of warranty.

    Summary: Carmax will give you a great price for your trade in if it is in good shape – particularly if you aren’t planning on buying another car. Make sure you get a quote from them if you’re trading in. If you’re buying (particularly pre-owned), be sure to check outside of the DC area. Even if you don’t want to be as drastic as I was, looking at areas that are 2-3 hours away can definitely save you a thousand or two – even on a less expensive car.

    Finally, be sure you get a Carfax on a used car if you go that route. A car with accident history (or worse) gets extremely difficult to sell at a reasonable price.

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