52°Clear

Home > General Discussion > Python on the loose in Fairlington Arbor

Python on the loose in Fairlington Arbor
  • Arlington Cat July 12, 2012 - 4:22 pm #52274 Reply

    Fairlington residents, There is a baby Python on the loose in Arlington.  He rudely left a picnic and hasn't been seen since.  The Python, who goes by the name “Happy,” was Last seen in Fairlington Arbor by the tennis courts.   

    Arlington Cat July 12, 2012 - 4:35 pm #52275 Reply
    Rob M July 12, 2012 - 5:45 pm #52276 Reply

    Hopefully it doesn't make it's way to North Arlington….wonder if it will eve be found

    redstang423 July 12, 2012 - 5:55 pm #52277 Reply

    I'm calling shotty on the witty twitter account for the missing snake…

    Mary-Austin July 12, 2012 - 6:25 pm #52278 Reply

    That does not sound good.

    If you watch the video you can see how this happened. The mom seems like a complete ditz. 

    You know the type…giving her 5 year old son a mohawk and 6 year old daughter pet pythons. Ugh.

    Arlington Cat July 12, 2012 - 7:36 pm #52279 Reply

     I totally agree, and there
    are many breakdowns here.  This type of
    snake can climb (slither up) a tree.  It
    is natural for them.  The snake probably
    high tailed it to the big oak and evergreen trees diagonal to the tennis
    courts, and is settling in  for the rest
    of the summer and most of the fall.  
    Neighbors should have been asked to be aware of odd screaming or vocally
    agitated  birds in that area over the
    next few months.   The news didn't tell
    us this information , and she gave false hope to her kids, acting like the
    snake is akin to a lost dog or cat.    
    The real danger comes when the weather turns cold. 

    Rob M July 12, 2012 - 8:39 pm #52280 Reply

     I totally agree, and there
    are many breakdowns here.  This type of
    snake can climb (slither up) a tree.  It
    is natural for them.  The snake probably
    high tailed it to the big oak and evergreen trees diagonal to the tennis
    courts, and is settling in  for the rest
    of the summer and most of the fall.  
    Neighbors should have been asked to be aware of odd screaming or vocally
    agitated  birds in that area over the
    next few months.   The news didn't tell
    us this information , and she gave false hope to her kids, acting like the
    snake is akin to a lost dog or cat.    
    The real danger comes when the weather turns cold. 

    How do you know so much about lost python habits?

    Sikudhani July 12, 2012 - 8:57 pm #52281 Reply

    Arlington Cat said:

    The Python, who goes by the name “Happy,”

    I'll remember to call that name out to any Snakes I deem adequately anthropomorphic.

    Arlington Cat July 13, 2012 - 8:16 am #52282 Reply

    Rob M said:

     I totally agree, and there
    are many breakdowns here.  This type of
    snake can climb (slither up) a tree.  It
    is natural for them.  The snake probably
    high tailed it to the big oak and evergreen trees diagonal to the tennis
    courts, and is settling in  for the rest
    of the summer and most of the fall.  
    Neighbors should have been asked to be aware of odd screaming or vocally
    agitated  birds in that area over the
    next few months.   The news didn't tell
    us this information , and she gave false hope to her kids, acting like the
    snake is akin to a lost dog or cat.    
    The real danger comes when the weather turns cold. 

    How do you know so much about lost python habits?

     

    Visiting nature centers all over the country with my kids, and reading about animals in the wild with my kids.    Did you know it is not called a “Star Fish” anymore? 

    SteveP July 13, 2012 - 9:17 am #52283 Reply

    Arlington Cat said:

     I totally agree, and there
    are many breakdowns here.  This type of
    snake can climb (slither up) a tree.  It
    is natural for them.  The snake probably
    high tailed it to the big oak and evergreen trees diagonal to the tennis
    courts, and is settling in  for the rest
    of the summer and most of the fall.  
    Neighbors should have been asked to be aware of odd screaming or vocally
    agitated  birds in that area over the
    next few months.   The news didn't tell
    us this information , and she gave false hope to her kids, acting like the
    snake is akin to a lost dog or cat.    
    The real danger comes when the weather turns cold. 

    Oh, I dunno about finding the python by being aware of odd/agitated birds. It would be much more common for a black rat snake (indigenous to the area and quite the climber and nest rustler – it also gets as big or bigger than this breed of python) to be bothering the birds around here. That and house cats. I've lost cardinal nests in my backyard this year to both. Anyhow, there's plenty of snakes in the Arlington, but they keep to themselves and mostly remain unseen unless you're really looking.

    The snake is gone for good though and this one will die as soon as it gets cold since it isn't adapted to the climate.

    I know a lot of people fear snakes, but discounting venomous and the very large (Burmese Pythons for example), unleashed and lost and dogs should be more of a concern that this snake.

    newty25 July 13, 2012 - 9:40 am #52284 Reply

    Arlington Cat said:

    Fairlington residents, There is a baby Python on the loose in Arlington.  He rudely left a picnic and hasn't been seen since.  The Python, who goes by the name “Happy,” was Last seen in Fairlington Arbor by the tennis courts.   

    Tonight there will be a python on the loose in Ballston!

     

    C'mon… you knew it was coming…!

    Tabby_TwoTone July 13, 2012 - 10:08 am #52285 Reply

    Has anyone seen that shifty-eyed guy who runs the Fairlington Social Club (in human form) since this incident? 

    Arlington Cat July 13, 2012 - 10:13 am #52286 Reply

    you are absolutely right;  the snake is gone for good.  wether it is up a tree,  under a townhouse, or under the tennis courts, it is gone from human sight.  My point was that if it went for a tree, and there are massive 60-70 year old trees in the immediate area, as its natural motivation would draw him, a clue to where it is might be would be squawking birds when it invades the nests.  In other words, for this family to think this snake is still on top of grass in the Arbor is naive at best.  I don't believe the AWLA will climb a tree to retrieve the snake, and it would be dangerous for residents to climb a tree to get it.  In the winter it will most likely die. 

    I appreciate you using the word “venomous” and not “poisonous;” you know something about snakes.  Did you see the AWLA's press release about determining a snake as being “not poisonous?”  I fell out of my chair on that one.   

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

×

Subscribe to our mailing list