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Will there be a boycott of the Whole Foods here?
  • novasteve January 18, 2013 - 2:56 pm #63738 Reply
    Tabby_TwoTone January 18, 2013 - 3:23 pm #63752 Reply

    He looks like Jeff Goldblum in the early stages of his metamorphosis to The Fly (check out his bulging compound eye).

     

     

    Quoth the Raven January 18, 2013 - 3:56 pm #63756 Reply

    If you start deciding where to shop/what music to listen to/what movies to go to based on the personalities/ideologies of the folks involved, you’re going to have to start growing your own food and staying home every night.  I like Whole Foods, and couldn’t care less what he does or does not think about Obamacare.

    Swag January 18, 2013 - 7:45 pm #63767 Reply

    Even the people who work for WFM don’t give a sh*t what Mackey thinks. Why should the customers?

    His board of directors will get him back in line, just like they did a couple years ago when he said WFM was going to stop selling anything that wasn’t “healthy”.

    R. Griffon January 18, 2013 - 11:11 pm #63770 Reply

    As a business owner, Obamacare is the best thing to happen to health insurance since I started the business.  It’s the fist time our premiums HAVEN’T gone up by double-digits, and last year we actually got a check back (as required by Obamacare) because costs were lower than expected.  Go figure.

    But FWIW, I still think the basic premise is a flawed, not to mention unconstitutional in that it requires every American to purchase commercial services.  I’d much rather a single-payer system like the UK or Canada.

    Theakston January 19, 2013 - 12:37 pm #63787 Reply

    Not suprised that NS reads a UK paper so right wing it supported the UK fa$cist party

    Theakston January 19, 2013 - 12:41 pm #63781 Reply

    Why am I not suprised that NS gets his news from a UK paper most famous for its support of Moseley’s blackshirts (UK Nazi party)?

    Theakston January 19, 2013 - 12:41 pm #63782 Reply

    Why am I not suprised that NS gets his news from a UK paper notorious for their support of the UK fascist party?

     

    johnny b January 19, 2013 - 1:04 pm #63793 Reply

    UK has National dental care as part of its system…not much of an incentive there. Not to mention their ‘panels’ who decide on who gets what, when.

    Canada’s system only works because they can send folks south to U.S. hospitals to handle the overflow. BTW there is now more and more movement away from their traditional system due to unsustainable high costs.

    After watching the WF guy with Greta the other day, I might have to shop there more often.

    “Conscious Capitalism” – sounds good to me.

    okfuskee January 19, 2013 - 1:41 pm #63794 Reply

    Ha Ha – been shopping elsewhere (MOM’s Organic) for years for this and other reasons. Nothing new here. Like they say in Portlandia, “whole foods is corporate.”

    Sincerely,

    Crazy Eyed Knee Jerk Tax and Spend Save the World Liberal

    Michael H. January 19, 2013 - 8:40 pm #63800 Reply

    No healthcare system is going to work unless people lead more healthy lives. That means better nutrition, more exercise and less smoking. Sedentary lifestyles and junk food diets have contributed greatly to the explosion in obesity rates and the resulting health problems: Type II diabetes rates skyrocketing, high blood pressure, early disability because of obesity (fewer years paying into gov’t or private insurance programs, more years drawing from those systems and at higher dollar totals than someone who is not obese), decreased quality of life and shorter lives.

    Some people go on and on about unfair subsidies for this and that, and yet they completely ignore the massive subsidies that are somehow acceptable to certain folks. In the case of healthcare spending, I’m talking about the massive subsidies that people who eat healthy diets and exercise pay so that others can live on junk food and lead sedentary lives. That lifestyle closely correlates with obesity rates, obesity rates correlate with increased rates of diabetes/high blood pressure/heart disease, and those increased disease rates result in healthcare expenditures double that of a non-obese person.

    Who pays for those medical bills? Other people do, either through higher healthcare taxes for gov’t programs but also through much higher health premiums for private insurance programs. Costs are shared in both public and private systems. There really isn’t “personal responsibility” in a private insurance system either. It’s the nature of an insurance-based system.

    How much do the medical bills go up because of unhealthy lifestyles? It’s estimated that the U.S. spends $190 billion a year (that’s with a “B”) to treat obesity-related medical problems. That’s a whopping number, no matter how you try to explain it away. It also means that political solutions for healthcare are simply moving money around without providing the massive dollar amounts needed to cover those costs.

    Michael H. January 19, 2013 - 8:41 pm #63799 Reply

    No healthcare system is going to work unless people lead more healthy lives. That means better nutrition, more exercise and less smoking. Sedentary lifestyles and junk food diets have contributed greatly to the explosion in obesity rates and the resulting health problems: Type II diabetes rates skyrocketing, high blood pressure, early disability because of obesity (fewer years paying into gov’t or private insurance programs, more years drawing from those systems and at higher dollar totals than someone who is not obese), decreased quality of life and shorter lives.

    Some people here go on and on about unfair subsidies for this and that, and yet they completely ignore the massive subsidies that are somehow acceptable to a supposed conservative. In the case of healthcare spending, I’m talking about the massive subsidies that people who eat healthy diets and exercise pay so that others can live on junk food and lead sedentary lives. That lifestyle closely correlates with obesity rates, obesity rates correlate with increased rates of diabetes/high blood pressure/heart disease, and those increased disease rates result in healthcare expenditures double that of a non-obese person.

    Who pays for those medical bills? Other people do, either through higher healthcare taxes for gov’t programs but also through much higher health premiums for private insurance programs. Costs are shared in both public and private systems. There really isn’t “personal responsibility” in a private insurance system either. It’s the nature of an insurance-based system.

    How much do the medical bills go up because of unhealthy lifestyles? It’s estimated that the U.S. spends $190 billion a year (that’s with a “B”) to treat obesity-related medical problems. That’s a whopping number, no matter how you try to explain it away. It also means that political solutions for healthcare are simply moving money around without providing the massive dollar amounts needed to cover those costs.

    I’m less concerned about the Obamacare/unspecified alternative than I am about selfish and reckless behavior from tens of millions of adults who think they have some personal right to eat what they want, flaunt their unhealthy habits and refuse to exercise. Yes, people have personal freedom. But in the case of flaunting an unhealthy diet? Well, if you’re taking money from other people’s pockets in the form of higher healthcare taxes and higher private insurance premiums, then no, you really don’t have a right to do whatever the heck you want, unless you volunteer to contribute extra money to pay for that $190 billion in obesity-related healthcare expenditures.

    Think of this, not just the ideological debate about healthcare. The next time you stufff a Twinkie or BBQ rib in your mouth, and that is part of an overall unhealthy lifestyle, you are essentially taking money from other people’s wallets. Not fair and not a good display of personal responsibility. Note that I am talking about AVOIDABLE health conditions and expenditures, not genetic diseases and accidents, which are going to happen, often through no fault of the patient. We should certainly look out for those who get struck down by such diseases and injuries. I am not as sympathetic about avoidable problems, especially when people celebrate how badly they eat and how lazy they are.

    (Side note: A car-exclusive lifestyle contributes greatly to the problem of sedentary lifestyles. While it’s difficult to nail down the exact health costs of a car-exclusive transportation lifestyle, there is a cost in far too many cases. Those costs are not included in transportation spending. But if you want to be honest about the total societal costs of promoting automobile travel to the near exclusion of everything else, you absolutely need to consider that $190 billion in avoidable healthcare costs. Doesn’t mean we should ban cars. Not at all. But it does mean that we should continue to offer people options in transportation, both to ease gridlock and also to promote healthier lifestyles. There are societal and financial benefits to doing so.)

    Michael H. January 19, 2013 - 8:41 pm #63801 Reply

    I’m less concerned about the Obamacare/unspecified alternative than I am about selfish and reckless behavior from tens of millions of adults who think they have some personal right to eat what they want, flaunt their unhealthy habits and refuse to exercise. Yes, people have personal freedom. But in the case of flaunting an unhealthy diet? Well, if you’re taking money from other people’s pockets in the form of higher healthcare taxes and higher private insurance premiums, then no, you really don’t have a right to do whatever the heck you want, unless you volunteer to contribute extra money to pay for that $190 billion in obesity-related healthcare expenditures.

    Think of this, not just the ideological debate about healthcare. The next time you stufff a Twinkie or BBQ rib in your mouth, and that is part of an overall unhealthy lifestyle, you are essentially taking money from other people’s wallets. Not fair and not a good display of personal responsibility. Note that I am talking about AVOIDABLE health conditions and expenditures, not genetic diseases and accidents, which are going to happen, often through no fault of the patient. We should certainly look out for those who get struck down by such diseases and injuries. I am not as sympathetic about avoidable problems, especially when people celebrate how badly they eat and how lazy they are.

    (Side note: A car-exclusive lifestyle contributes greatly to the problem of sedentary lifestyles. While it’s difficult to nail down the exact health costs of a car-exclusive transportation lifestyle, there is a cost in far too many cases. Those costs are not included in transportation spending. But if you want to be honest about the total societal costs of promoting automobile travel to the near exclusion of everything else, you absolutely need to consider that $190 billion in avoidable healthcare costs. Doesn’t mean we should ban cars. Not at all. But it does mean that we should continue to offer people options in transportation, both to ease gridlock and also to promote healthier lifestyles. There are societal and financial benefits to doing so.)

    johnny b January 19, 2013 - 8:46 pm #63804 Reply

    WTF!!!

    Michael H. January 19, 2013 - 8:49 pm #63805 Reply

    (Sorry about the duplicates.)

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