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by ARLnow.com Sponsor July 6, 2017 at 4:30 pm 0

Address: 6145 Tompkins Drive, McLean, VA 22101
Neighborhood: Chesterbrook
Listed: $1,899,000
Open: Sunday, July 9 from 2-4 p.m.

Just a short drive over the border of Arlington off of Chesterbrook Road, you’ll find 6145 Tompkins Drive.

This beautiful home by Classic Cottages sits on a 15,125 square foot lot and comes equipped with a geothermal heating and cooling system, hand finished hardwood flooring, premium quartz and granite counters, Subzero and Wolf appliances, coffered and tray ceilings, stylish lighting and plumbing fixtures, custom wood soft close cabinetry, smart home security system and much more including lower level entertainment room with wet bar and rear exit to backyard deck.

Quiet neighborhood with great schools, this home won’t last long, so please contact me as soon as possible!

Listed by:

Gina Baca
Classic Cottages Realty, LLC
619-929-5585
[email protected]

by Chris Teale July 6, 2017 at 3:30 pm 0

Someone phoned in a bomb threat to the county’s Emergency Communications Center in Courthouse yesterday morning.

The threat was made just before 9 a.m. on July 5. It prompted a sweep of the building, which houses the Arlington County Police Department’s headquarters and the local courts. No explosives were found.

A similar threat was made last September on police headquarters. No explosives were found that time either.

From an ACPD crime report:

BOMB THREAT, 2017-07050054, 1400 block of N. Courthouse Road. At approximately 8:57 a.m. on July 5, an anonymous subject called in and stated there was a bomb in the building. Multiple units responded to the scene and conducted a search for a device with negative results.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor July 6, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

Ready Arlington banner

This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Our weeklong initiative to design and implement a girls summer camp and leadership development has concluded, and we are happy with the results thus far, taking note of adjustments for next year.

The Office of Emergency Management now heads into preparation for National Preparedness Month in September, and we’ll be at several events in July and August.

Family emergency communications is one topic that came up many times during the HERricane summer camp run by the Office of Emergency Management. An element of the camp was to increase awareness of natural and man-made hazards. Being informed is the first critical step in developing a Family Emergency Communication Plan.

There was a special focus during the camp on building a family emergency kit. Students reflected that they learned to consider nontraditional items in their kits to provide comfort during an emergency.

They also had an opportunity to participate in an Iron Chef-styled competition only using ingredients most households would have on hand during an emergency, such as canned foods. One student, age 15, remarked that she felt more prepared to be creative with food choices in the event she and her family need to rely on their emergency kit.

Remember to be informed by signing up for Arlington Alert, make a plan with your family in the event of an emergency, build a kit, and get involved with a volunteer group such as ANCHoR.

HERricane Arlington empowers women to pursue careers and leadership roles in emergency management through a week-long “camp,” and also includes long-term professional development opportunities. HERricane will be hosting follow-up events throughout the school year. In September camp students will receive a tour of the Emergency Call Center and complete a related service project.

September is National Preparedness Month and this year the Office of Emergency Management is focusing on family preparedness.  For more information, follow us at ReadyArlington on Facebook and @readyarlington on Twitter.

by Mark Kelly July 6, 2017 at 1:45 pm 0

Mark KellyThe Right Note is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

After spending over $17 million for the yet-to-be-opened ART bus light maintenance facility in South Arlington, the county announced it is close to acquiring land for a third ART bus facility in Springfield.

The land cost for the heavy maintenance facility in Springfield itself is reported to be $4.65 million before up to $32 million could be added in the design and build process.

County officials admitted when the first facility was announced that it was too small to meet actual maintenance and storage needs, but that did not stop them from moving forward with it. The maintenance facilities are on top of the acquisition of land for ART bus parking in Shirlington.

As noted at the time, the South Arlington facility would save tax taxpayers $57,000 a year that Arlington pays to use existing Metrobus maintenance facilities. At that rate, the facility will pay for itself in about 308 years. If Arlington taxpayers are lucky, the heavy maintenance facility will pay for itself in 100 years or less.

Sure, Metro could stop allowing us to use their facilities, though it is hard to imagine they are looking to shed any extra revenue sources right now. Yes, it’s nice to have a facility that is our own. But spending millions on a “nice to have” project is the type of decision that can eventually get governments into financial hot water.

To put this in business terms, the decision to move forward with these maintenance facilities represents a negative return on investment. Only in government would you justify them as saving taxpayers money.

Of course, the government also calls it a spending “cut” when programs only grow by 4 percent instead of 5 percent. They also call reducing travel lanes and the resulting rush hour traffic backups, “road improvements.”

Speaking of “saving” money, our friends at the “Progressive Voice” printed more of the resolutions that the 8th District Democrats adopted this spring. On top of their list for spending money is universal health care.

With estimates of $400 billion annually to pay for universal health care in California alone, nearly $20 trillion in federal debt, and a 2017 federal budget deficit of $693 billion, there is simply no way to pay for it. And no, there not enough rich people in America to pay for it even if we doubled the amount they pay in income tax.

by Peter Rousselot July 6, 2017 at 1:00 pm 0

Peter RousselotPeter’s Take is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Last week, the County and School Boards held a combined work session with the Joint Facilities Advisory Commission. County Board chair Jay Fisette also delivered a mid-year State of the County address.

Some of the comments made at these events reflected welcome candor — possibly a much-needed acknowledgement of the multiple, urgent challenges confronting Arlington.

As Fisette stated, Arlington’s critical response must be to “plan, plan, plan, plan.”

Arlington needs comprehensive, integrated long-term planning

Smart growth 2.0

Arlington’s much-praised transit-oriented smart growth vision was adopted in the 1970s. Almost 50 years later, residents are increasingly concerned about the challenges of future growth and development.

I have written columns about some of these challenges, including:

Between now and September, the County and School Boards should do some long-term strategic thinking about:

  • aspects of our smart growth policies that should be re-examined based upon projected macro-economic conditions for Arlington over the next 30 years
  • new tools that should be considered to address our challenges

Such internal deliberations must consider policy and priority choices that range far beyond the appropriate scope for JFAC.

By September, the County Board should propose for community discussion a draft working list of topics that ought to be reviewed in a very broad-based community process leading to Smart Growth 2.0.

JFAC

Over the summer, the County and School Boards need to adopt a new work plan on which JFAC can commence at its scheduled September 20 meeting.

Comprehensive long-term facilities planning is paramount

JFAC’s highest priority must be the integrated assessment and planning for long-term County and APS facility needs, including of course APS capacity needs, for the next 15 years. This JFAC process must be continuously informed by and integrate the interim conclusions and decisions made by the County Board’s parallel Smart Growth 2.0 planning process.

JFAC should not be distracted by further BUCK and VHC responsibilities

To ensure that JFAC can focus its limited resources on the demands of its long-term planning process, the County Board should not task JFAC with any further significant leadership or operational responsibilities regarding land use decisions for the Buck and VHC sites. Instead, separate working groups should be convened for each of those sites, including neighborhood representation, to lead and make these decisions — perhaps with a JFAC liaison or co-chair.

Maybe relieve JFAC of short-term bus siting responsibilities

Only if resources permit should JFAC be tasked to conduct a short-term study of bus storage siting options. In any event, whatever group studies these options should not be artificially constrained either by locations within Arlington’s geographic borders or conventional approaches to bus storage.

Conclusion

With growing acknowledgement of the significant fiscal and physical challenges confronting the county, the County Board needs to commence in September a broad public conversation ultimately leading to an updated vision for future growth and development that commands substantial public support.

JFAC should focus beginning in September on a long-term, comprehensive assessment across county and APS of likely facility needs and siting proposals to be informed ultimately by the results of the “visioning” process.

If resources permit, JFAC should undertake a short-term project re bus storage siting.  Any other possible JFAC projects should be addressed through separate processes.

by Progressive Voice July 6, 2017 at 12:15 pm 0

Progressive Voice is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of their organizations or ARLnow.com.

By Krista O’Connell

Some Democrats are stuck in a paradox: they yearn for President Donald Trump to be impeached yet want him to complete his first term to drive Democratic turnout in upcoming elections. This dangerous mindset puts party over country.

If the President has colluded with Russia, obstructed justice, or accepted money from foreign governments, he should be impeached immediately. And if Democrats can effectively communicate their values and policies to voters, then they have something to fall back on to drive turnout separate from anti-Trump fervor.

The Democratic Party must be a progressive party with a vision for the future and cannot be a reactionary party defined by opposition. As the vanguard of the Democratic Party, the Democratic National Committee must invest in more than the anti-Trump fervor highlighted in most of its press releases and its Twitter feed.

There is much about President Trump’s administration worth opposing — from a travel ban that reneges on America’s founding principles to his decision to leave the Paris Accord that puts special interests over the general welfare. But blanket opposition must be paired with promotion of a positive agenda. Opposition should be backed up with strong alternative policies.

The same problems and policies that plague the Trump Administration were apparent in his campaign, but voters still elected him. Trump speaks for himself. Will Democrats find their voice?

While anti-Trump fervor will bring some short-term gains, Democratic organizations must champion their own policies so they can lead effectively and promote a progressive agenda once President Trump is out of office or when Democrats gain control of Congress.

Furthermore, Democrats shouldn’t overlook two important factions – members of progressive, grassroots organizations that are leading much of the resistance; and voters who are becoming fatigued by the endless coverage of President Trump and are losing faith in democracy and politics as a result. Democratic organizations can reach each of these factions by supporting the resistance while offering a strong, positive agenda.

The national Democratic Party has an impressive platform, but it must be communicated effectively. Democratic policies have the potential to reach and energize voters — especially young people – through the planks of ending LGBT employment discrimination; making the minimum wage a living wage; expanding access to healthcare; creating a path to citizenship for undocumented Americans; and making debt-free college a reality.

While local party chapters (like the Arlington Young Democrats) have done a good job of advocating for these issues, national Democrats must do a better job of framing the national narrative.

Democrats focused primarily on obstruction should look to Republicans’ health care resistance without a positive alternative as a cautionary tale. For seven years, Republicans campaigned against President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, repeatedly voting to repeal knowing they could not override a veto.

Yet, even after winning the White House, Republicans have struggled to come up with an alternative to ACA. The House and Senate proposals are both deeply unpopular and will leave Republican members of Congress at risk even if they manage to pass a bill.

While Democrats absolutely must continue to oppose the Republican bills, they must also propose how they would amend the ACA to address some of the shortcomings that do exist. That way, when Democrats regain control of Congress, they will be ready to act and have a mandate for doing so.

The Democratic Party has its challenges — the recent election exposed a rift in the party between moderates and progressives and also between the old guard and young activists. Opposing President Trump is a good way to find common ground among liberals (and even with some Republicans), but being strategic about politics shouldn’t come at the expense of policy and values.

Instead of ignoring this divide and putting off internal debate, the party should engage in some serious soul-searching. There is no shortage of analysis on what went wrong in the 2016 election, now it’s time to decide in which direction to steer the ship.

At the end of the day, anti-Trump sentiment might get some voters to show up to Democratic meetings and vote in 2017 or 2018, but it’s not going to get them to stay. Democratic leaders and national Democratic organizations need to give people reasons to vote Democratic besides voting against President Trump.

To do so, the Party must reach voters – whether newly engaged in the resistance or instead becoming disillusioned by the democratic process — with a positive message of social, economic and environmental justice.

Krista O’Connell is a member of the Arlington Young Democrats executive board who is passionate about education policy. Follow her on Twitter @krioconnell.

by Katherine Berko July 6, 2017 at 11:00 am 0

Rosslyn’s new Sweetgreen will open its doors on the ground floor of the Central Place apartment tower next week.

The D.C.-founded salad purveyor will be fully open for customers on July 11 at 1800 N. Lynn Street, after staff training and a soft opening in the days before.

A spokeswoman for the Rosslyn Business Improvement District said that new employees are being trained on making Sweetgreen’s various salads, then donating them to the homeless. Local advocacy group A-SPAN and D.C. Central Kitchen across the Potomac River will receive the prepared salads.

For the soft opening, customers can receive free lunch or dinner at an RSVP-only event, while on Monday, July 10, Sweetgreen will host a free lunch in honor of Neighborhood Day, another RSVP-only event.

All proceeds from the eatery’s official launch on Tuesday will be donated to Dreaming Out Loud, a local nonprofit that looks to build healthy, equitable food systems.

This will be the fifth Sweetgreen in Arlington. Other locations are in Ballston, ClarendonCrystal City and Pentagon City.

by ARLnow.com July 6, 2017 at 10:00 am 0

Following a long period of growth, the restaurant industry is hurting nationwide, with an overabundance of restaurant options and competition from grocery stores and delivery services like BlueApron.

There is local evidence of the industry’s woes: a steady stream of closings, a slower pace of openings.

On the other hand, turnover in the restaurant business is normal and to be expected, and a walk through neighborhoods like Clarendon and Shirlington reveals plenty of crowded eateries on most nights.

One factor influencing how local restaurants fare is how often local residents go out to eat. So today we’re asking: are you going out to eat more or less often than you were two years ago?

by ARLnow.com July 6, 2017 at 9:00 am 0

County Seeking Cash for EFC Upgrades — Arlington County is seeking $30 million in congestion relief funds from the future I-66 toll lanes to help fund some upgrades at the East Falls Church Metro station. Among the hoped-f0r changes: a second entrance to the station, from Washington Boulevard, and the addition of two new bus bays. [InsideNova]

New School Board Leadership — Barbara Kanninen has been elected by her colleagues as chair of the Arlington School Board for the 2017-2018 school year. Reid Goldstein was selected as vice chair. [Twitter]

Arlington Man Arrested for Murder — A 24-year-old Arlington man was arrested in Arlington last week and charged in connection with a 2016 homicide in Waldorf, Maryland. Authorities say Bryan Aquice was the second shooter in the case; he is one of four in custody for the crime. [NBC WashingtonSouthern Maryland News Net]

High School Football Schedules — Fall high school football schedules for Wakefield, Washington-Lee, Yorktown and Bishop O’Connell have been released. [InsideNova]

Straddling Bus Was a Scam — That traffic-straddling bus that some locals were fascinated by last year as a possible futuristic transit solution? It was apparently an investment scam. [BBC]

Flickr pool photo by Dennis Dimick

by Chris Teale July 6, 2017 at 8:25 am 0

Arlington County is under a flash flood watch until 7 p.m. tonight, with the rest of the D.C. metropolitan area.

The National Weather Service said between one and three inches of rain are possible, with multiple rounds of rainfall throughout the day. More showers are expected this afternoon, and thunderstorms may also hit the region.

NWS advises that those living near rivers, streams and creeks should watch water levels during heavy rain.

Update at 5:55 p.m. — The Flash Flood Watch was extended until 2 a.m.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor July 6, 2017 at 6:00 am 0

Exclusive home buying class in Arlington to be held on 7/10 and 7/24. The first 3 to attend get a free Roku Express!

How to Succeed as a Buyer in a Seller’s Market:

  1. Work with an experienced agent.
  2. Get pre-approved for a mortgage before starting your house hunt.
  3. Don’t overanalyze a home’s listing price
  4. Don’t play the lowball game — make your best offer!
  5. Prepare for a bidding war.

Want more tips for home buying success? Attend the Home Buyer Class hosted by Orange Line Living!

You will get a comprehensive explanation of the home purchasing process – there’s more to know than you’d think. The Orange Line Living Team will be teaching all of the acronyms and definitions you will need, what happens at each stage of your transaction, real strategies on how to negotiate a lower purchase price, the different type of loans available, and much more. There will be local specialists from multiple industries in attendance, so come with questions.

Benefits of Attending

  • $1,500 credit towards your new home
  • 12-month home buy-back guarantee
  • Food and drinks provided
  • AND the first 3 to attend will receive a Roku Express!

The event is hosted by best-selling author and top nationally-ranked real estate agent Dan Lesniak, author of The HyperLocal HyperFast Real Estate Agent. Dan and his team have developed a special process that has allowed them to help over one thousand local families buy or sell their home.

Details

Space is limited so be sure to register at arlingtonhomebuyerclass.com.

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