29°Mostly Cloudy

by ARLnow.com Sponsor November 30, 2017 at 5:45 pm 0

Address: 422 North George Mason Drive
Neighborhood: Buckingham
Listed: $970,000
Open: Sunday, December 3, from 2-4 p.m.

Located in the luxury townhouse community at Ballston Row, this beautiful 2,309 square feet townhouse features 4 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms. Built in 2013, the townhouse has all modern amenities, including 4 bedroom suites each with their own full bathroom.

On the lower level, you’ll find a bright office or guest suite along with a 2-car garage. The main level offers an open floor plan with hardwood floors throughout the kitchen, dining room and living room. The kitchen features a large island, granite counters and stainless steel appliances.

Upstairs features a master bedroom suite with a huge walk-in closet and custom shelving. There is also a generously sized second bedroom complete with its own bathroom. The upper loft level contains a private fourth bedroom suite encompassing the entire level. To top it all off, entertain your guests on the rooftop deck, complete with gas hook-up for your BBQ grill.

Conveniently located minutes from Ballston Metro, restaurants and the future Ballston Quarter development. Don’t miss out on this opportunity for luxury living.

Stop by to see everything this great home has to offer at our open house this Sunday, December 3 from 2-4 p.m.

Listed by:
Peggy Yee
Frankly Realtors
Call/Text: 703-349-0143
[email protected]
http://frankly.com/peggy

by ARLnow.com November 30, 2017 at 5:00 pm 0

(Updated at 5:40 p.m.) The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting a 5.1 4.4 4.1 magnitude earthquake — centered near Dover, Delaware — shook the region just after 4:45 p.m. Thursday.

One local resident said via Twitter that her house shuddered and glassware rattled in the home’s cabinets during the quake. But not everyone felt it — here at ARLnow.com HQ in Clarendon, the quake went unnoticed by three employees until tweets started showing up on our feed.

The temblor may have been the biggest in the Mid-Atlantic region since the August 23, 2011 quake.

Did you feel the quake?

by Chris Teale November 30, 2017 at 4:45 pm 0

Pentagon Row will host its fourth annual holiday celebration this Saturday (December 2).

Frost Fest begins at 5 p.m. at the ice rink at Army Navy Drive and S. Joyce Street. The event will include an on-ice firework display with Santa Claus, music from a DJ, live entertainment from local artists and ice sculptures.

Attendees can also sample foods from some nearby restaurants, pick up holiday shopping specials and win a $1,000 Pentagon Row shopping spree giveaway.

Pentagon Row’s 6,840-square-foot outdoor ice rink is now open, and will be open on all holidays. Admission costs $8 for those aged 12 and under); and $9 for those aged 13 and older. Skate rental costs $4.

The rink’s hours will be as follows:

  • Mondays to Thursdays: Noon to 10 p.m.
  • Fridays: Noon to 11 p.m.
  • Saturdays: 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Sundays: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

by Mark Kelly November 30, 2017 at 4:15 pm 0

The Right Note is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

It was a busy week for the County Board. They made the final allocations of the $25.5 million of revenue that came in over the original budget projections for the 2017 fiscal year, as well as the $5.2 million of unspent funds in the closeout process.

The Board also approved borrowing for an additional $60 million for the new aquatics center.

Granted, the previous cost of the proposed project was inching closer to $100 million. Assuming that this project is at or near the top of “must-haves” for Arlington, the Board should not hurt their arms patting themselves on the back for saving money. We still have no reliable estimate for what the ongoing operating costs for the pool will be. A safe bet is more than the $1 million figure currently being discussed.

Also, it is important to remember the bond funding proposal approved by voters never included the words “aquatics center” or “pool.” It said “parks and recreation.”

This is why many of us have called for projects of this size to be the subject of stand-alone bond votes. If Board members are so sure county residents want the project, then they should have the political courage to let the project rise or fall on its own merits.

Borrowing money because you can is not only a terrible reason to do it, it puts you in a box for future project that are “needs” not “wants.” Board Member John Vihstadt essentially pointed this out when he outlined his opposition to the aquatics center plan.

But the Board does not even need to use new borrowing to pay for the pool. They had two other options that seemed to receive no serious consideration.

  1. Add the pool to a new middle or high school. Contrary to the sales presentation from county staff, this new pool is not walkable for many people, and it is certainly not close to any school.
  2. The no new bonding authority option. Using some of the closeout funds this year and the next two years, along with reprogramming from existing bonding authority to cover the costs of the project.

Yes, using some or all of the closeout funds would mean less bonus revenue would be transferred to the schools the next two years. But like the county, the schools are running a revenue to expenditure surplus in their budget already.

Contrary to tales of woe the School Board may tell, APS is not scraping by financially even with the influx of students. And by saving room for bonding authority, it would ensure no future school building is held up because we are spread thin by borrowing for county projects.

It was also disappointing to see the Board continue its tradition of putting forward budget guidance documents that assume a fictional “budget gap” despite taking in more than $25 million of additional tax revenue last year (just like every year).

by Progressive Voice November 30, 2017 at 3:45 pm 0

Progressive Voice is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of their organizations or ARLnow.com.

By Bill Rice

Although Virginia’s gubernatorial race was filled with contentious disagreement, there were a few subjects where the candidates saw eye-to-eye.

One such subject was Virginia’s felony larceny threshold. Both Governor-Elect Ralph Northam and Republican gubernatorial nominee Ed Gillespie agreed: Virginia’s current threshold of $200 is far too low, counter to a productive society and effective criminal justice system, and morally repugnant.

Virginia Code § 18.2-95 defines the theft of anything valued $200 or more as grand larceny — a felony. Anything less constitutes petit larceny, a misdemeanor. This threshold hasn’t been altered since 1980 and remains tied for the nation’s lowest. Accounting for inflation, $200 in 1980 is tantamount to nearly $600 today.

Punishment for grand larceny in Virginia includes either 1) a minimum of a year in state prison or 2) up to twelve months in jail and/or a fine up to $2,500.

Those convicted of grand larceny also face, as ex-offenders, barriers to housing, healthcare, and employment. In Virginia, felons are prohibited from voting, jury duty, running for office, and firearm ownership.

Denying individuals such civic and economic participation not only has moral implications, but also negatively affects our economy and society. People who could be productive, contributing members of society are instead ostracized and pushed back into the costly criminal justice system.

This doesn’t just pertain to adults: with larceny being the top category for 2017 juvenile arrests in Virginia, it’s no surprise our Commonwealth leads the nation in the “school-to-prison pipeline,” with juveniles referred into the criminal justice system at three times the national average.

Furthermore, can we honestly say that $200 today is a large enough sum of money to warrant punishment from which it is very hard to rebuild a productive life?

We regularly adjust other monetary legal thresholds in accordance with inflation, such as lobbyist contribution reporting laws for political committees or auditing laws for organizations doing business with the federal government.

If large corporations and politicians regularly benefit from reasonable adjustments to legal monetary thresholds, why shouldn’t this apply to a confused youth caught shoplifting a pair of Beats headphones?

Opponents of raising the threshold, like the National Retail Federation (NRT), argue that such action would increase shoplifting and other theft. But there is an abundance of facts that say otherwise.

The most extensive data on this subject comes from a 2016 Pew Charitable Trusts study on 28 states that raised their felony larceny thresholds between 2001 and 2011.

Pew concluded that “changes in state felony thresholds have not interrupted the long nationwide decline in property crime and larceny rates that began in the early 1990s,” adding that “the amount of a state’s felony threshold…is not correlated with its property crime and larceny rates.”

Similarly, opponents of raising Virginia’s felony larceny threshold often argue that California’s Proposition 47, which, among other things, raised the state’s felony larceny threshold to $950, led to an increase in property crime.

However, Proposition 47 was a comprehensive criminal justice reform bill that did much more than simply raise the larceny threshold. Also, it has only been in effect for about two years, leading the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice to say “it is too early to conclusively determine whether or not Prop 47 has had an impact on crime.”

NRT also cites unscientific information from its annual survey on organized retail crime (ORC) to argue that retail crime is on the rise. But this survey draws from an extremely limited and unrepresentative sample size and puts retailers’ perceptions ahead of hard data.

For example, the survey claims “100 percent of retailers surveyed believe they have been a victim of ORC in the past 12 months” without actual data supporting this belief. In fact, most of the reliable data available on these subjects clearly contradicts such claims.

Despite the overwhelming data, people may still have concerns. Thankfully, the Virginia State Crime Commission presents a compromise — raise the felony larceny threshold but create two types of petit larceny.

Larceny up to $200 would still constitute petit larceny with the current penalties. Larceny between $200 and the new monetary threshold would constitute “Aggravated Petit Larceny,” a Class 1 misdemeanor with heavier penalties.

Whether Virginia raises its felony larceny threshold to $500, $1,000, or more, one thing is clear: the current threshold is too low and there is bipartisan support to raise it reasonably. Let’s make it happen.

Bill Rice is co-chair of the Arlington Young Democrats’ Justice and Immigration Caucus. He serves as a volunteer in the Arlington community and has worked on a number of political campaigns. He currently works as a government contractor. He has previously written about Virginia’s felony larceny threshold for the Richmond Public Interest Law Review.

by Chris Teale November 30, 2017 at 3:15 pm 0

Update at 3:25 p.m. – Police have reopened the left-hand lane of westbound I-66. Traffic is proceeding slowly. Drivers can still expect delays as firefighters leave the scene.

Earlier: A vehicle fire closed the Rosslyn Tunnel on I-66 just after 3 p.m. this afternoon.

According to scanner traffic, a vehicle caught fire in the westbound lanes at mile marker 74.5. Traffic cameras showed the car had pulled over into the right shoulder.

Virginia State Police shut the tunnel to traffic heading west, with firefighters from the Arlington County Fire Department on scene to help put out the flames.

From the traffic cameras, there appeared to be some flames from the car’s underside, but firefighters quickly put out any fire just before 3:20 p.m.

Drivers in the area can expect delays.

by Peter Rousselot November 30, 2017 at 2:45 pm 0

Peter’s Take is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

In the last segment of its November 28 work session, the School Board discussed a proposed “Framework” for its forthcoming FY 2019-28 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). APS will begin formal planning for its new CIP in January.

Discussion

Given competing demands on Arlington County’s budget, APS’ leadership must adopt a much more cost-conscious approach at every stage of its capital budgeting processes. New enrollment growth projections are now expected in mid-December.

There have been some glimmers of hope.

At an Board meeting earlier this year, APS Superintendent Patrick Murphy acknowledged that he was “hearing from the community some concern about the CIP,” and that for future new school construction projects “there will be three flavors of budgets: Low, Medium and High.” (See video between 1:37:30 and 1:40:25.)

Murphy’s new approach needs to be very closely scrutinized to be sure that the 3 flavors of budgets are not “high, higher, and highest.”

Another glimmer of hope arises from the decision by the School Board’s internal auditor to examine how APS’ school construction costs compare to those in other jurisdictions. But, the auditor’s work product also will need close scrutiny, as the Sun-Gazette recently editorialized:

We’re hopeful that the auditor’s report on construction provides a true window into reality, not a whitewashed look by focusing on a narrow cadre of school districts with similar spending mentalities.

There are several things we must do together as a community to ensure that APS:

  • does provide the best fiscally-prudent new seats for our students, but
  • does not continue to spend money on capital projects “like the spigot would never run dry”

First, the County Board needs to be clear regarding how much capital spending will be available to APS in each of the ten years in the next CIP.

Second, as construction costs rise, School Board members must become much more proactive with their own staff by insisting upon cost-consciousness and new strategies in building construction and renovation.

Third, we need reformed civic engagement processes in which the public can weigh in early enough concerning a manageable number of budget-driving alternative options. We cannot continue with processes in which citizens or staff are enabled to add one feature after another, never being told what the costs of doing so are nor that APS can afford X or Y but not both.

Recently, a very savvy schools’ activist shared with me her kitchen-table solution for the problems with APS’ past approach to school construction and renovation:

For our home renovation, my husband and I decided on our total budget for the renovation FIRST, then as we were designing the house with the architect, we kept insisting on getting some high-level price estimates so we could decide if we wanted to continue going down [that] path.  

With APS, they do have some high-level planning with the CIP to set some general parameters for budget, but it’s my perception that it’s been the norm to involve the public through various engagement processes, like Building Level Planning Committees, completely disassociating it with any cost estimates/total budget, and of course, very few people are making cost-conscious suggestions when it’s treated as Wish Lists with open checkbooks.  

Conclusion

In the past, School Board members too frequently have rationalized high construction and renovation costs.

Now they need a new attitude: we can do more for less money.

by Chris Teale November 30, 2017 at 1:45 pm 0

A report has shown that areas of wealth and disadvantage exist very close together in Arlington, sometimes just blocks away from each other.

The report by the Northern Virginia Health Foundation, entitled “Getting Ahead: The Uneven Opportunity Landscape in Northern Virginia,” identifies what it calls 15 “islands of disadvantage,” where people face multiple serious challenges.

Those challenges include the levels of pre-school enrollment, teens out of high school, whether people have a Bachelor’s degree or higher, the level of English spoken in a household, unemployment rate, child poverty rate, health insurance rate and more.

Of those “islands,” three are either wholly or partly in Arlington: one near the county’s border with Bailey’s Crossroads and Seven Corners; another along Columbia Pike in the Douglas Park neighborhood; and another in the area of Buckingham and Fort Myer.

The report also found that neighborhoods separated by one thoroughfare can have very different demographics, housing and poverty levels.

“A striking example was near Ballston Common [Mall, rebranded as Ballston Quarter], where residents in two census tracts on either side of North Glebe Road — tracts 1019 and 1020.01 — faced very different living conditions,” the report reads. “In census tract 1019, east of N. Glebe Road, 85 percent of adults had a Bachelor’s degree or higher education and the median household income exceeded $160,000 per year.

“Just west of N. Glebe Road, in tract 1020.01, 30 percent of teens ages 15-17 years were not enrolled in school, only 38 percent of adults had a Bachelor’s degree and 48 percent of the population was uninsured.”

It also found that life expectancy can vary by as much as 10 years across the county, “from 78 years in the Buckingham area to 88 years in parts of Rosslyn and Aurora Highlands.”

To help improve conditions, the report recommended better access to health care, education and affordable housing.

“In today’s knowledge economy, advancement requires better access to education — from preschool through college — and economic development to bring jobs with livable wages to disadvantaged areas,” it reads. “And it requires an investment in the infrastructure of neglected neighborhoods, to make the living environment healthier and safer, to provide transportation, and to improve public safety. What is good for our health is also good for the economy and will make Arlington County a stronger community for all of its residents.”

Courtesy image

by ARLnow.com Sponsor November 30, 2017 at 12:45 pm 0

By Brianna Hurwitz

Ring in the “new year new you” this New Year’s Eve at the top local bars and restaurants hosting events in Arlington listed below. Guarantee you and all your friends celebrate in style and watch the New Year’s Eve ball drop by purchasing your early bird ticket now before tickets sell out. Visit NewYearsEveDMV.com or Eventbrite.

Mister Days (3100 Clarendon Blvd) — Forget driving and get the party started with a few drinks at Mister Days because this sports rock cafe is located less than one block from the Clarendon Metro stop. Mister Days has been opened since 1977 and is ready to ring in 2018 with you.

Barley Mac (1600 Wilson Blvd) — Ditch the champagne bubbles and have a “Beautifully Bourbon New Year’s Eve” at Rosslyn’s own Barley Mac bourbon bar. The party kicks off in the bar area only at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $45 and include three premium drink passes and hors d’oeuvres with a champagne toast at midnight. Guests can use their premium drink passes for select premium bourbons and whiskeys. For more details about the event call (571)800-3070.

Don Tito (3165 Wilson Blvd) — Party at the hottest tequila bar with the DJ spinning top 40 music beginning at 9 p.m. For $35, guests receive VIP entry, three drink passes and party favors. Watch the live coverage of New York City’s Times Square countdown as the ball drops. Just make sure to get to Don Tito’s before 11 p.m.

A-Town Bar and Grill (4100 Fairfax Drive) — Starting at 9 a.m. (yes, you read that right, 9 in the morning) A-Town Bar and Grill is hosting a “Maskquerade Ball”. Just be there by 11 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and the party won’t stop until 1:30 a.m. New Year’s Day. Admission is $25 and includes three drink passes, party favors and VIP entry. Dress to impress. Buy early because tickets typically sell out by mid-December.

The G.O.A.T (3028 Wilson Blvd) — Arlington’s sports bar and gaming lounge, The G.O.A.T, is getting ready and set for you to go celebrate with them all night long for New Year’s Eve. Did we mention there’s no cover charge? Get there early to bypass the long lines anticipated.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor November 30, 2017 at 11:45 am 0

Healthy Paws

Editor’s Note: Healthy Paws is a column sponsored and written by the owners of Clarendon Animal Care, a full-service, general practice veterinary clinic and winner of a 2017 Arlington Chamber of Commerce Best Business Award. The clinic is located 3000 10th Street N., Suite B. and can be reached at 703-997-9776.

Online, 3rd party, pet pharmacies such as 1-800-Petmeds, Allivet and many others, have become very popular over the recent years, and with good reason. They often are able to offer lower prices on many of the medications commonly prescribed by veterinarians, with the convenience of having it shipped directly to your home. It seems like a no-brainer that this would be a win-win. After all, in most cases we fill our own prescription medications at pharmacies rather than our doctors’ offices, so why should it be any different for our pets?  

It turns out the situation is not quite as straight-forward as it may seem. Most of the major pharmaceutical companies claim to not sell their products directly to these online pharmacy sources and that they cannot track their product. As such, they do not guarantee the product for its efficacy, expiration date or validity. They will guarantee safety, so long as it is not a counterfeit product. This does beg several questions:

  • Where are these drugs coming from, if not from the manufacturer? In some cases, they are coming from unscrupulous veterinarians who purchase a large quantity at cost and then sell it to an online pharmacy for resale to the customer. In other cases, counterfeit product is sold. 
  • What happens if my pet experiences an adverse reaction, or the product is ineffective? When many brand-name prescription medications are purchased directly from your veterinarian the manufacturer stands behind the product, guaranteeing both its safety and its efficacy for the labeled indications. As such, if there is a product failure, or an adverse reaction, the veterinarian can contact the manufacturer to report the incident and often obtain some financial compensation for the client for necessary treatments or even diagnostic tests. However, when the product is purchased through a 3rd party online pharmacy avenue, the manufacturer does not support the product because they cannot guarantee that it the product has been labeled or handled correctly, or that it actually is their product.  

Lets use heartworm prevention as an example. Heartworm disease can be very serious medically for the pet, but also very expensive to treat. If a pet has been on heartworm preventative diligently, and the veterinarian has records to indicate appropriate purchase intervals, the company will help to cover the cost of treatment.

In our area of Northern Virginia, heartworm disease is not especially endemic, but the intestinal parasites roundworms and hookworms both are. Both are on the label for treatment for many heartworm preventatives. We have, on more than one occasion, been able to report a treatment failure to the appropriate manufacturer and obtain compensation for treatment costs and follow-up testing for the client. Testing and follow up that may otherwise cost hundreds (sometimes thousands in the case of heartworm disease) of dollars.

Issues and complaints with online pet pharmacies have become frequent enough over recent years that the FDA has created a program called AWARE to educate pet owners about what to be on the look-out for when it comes to online pet pharmacies.  

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by Chris Teale November 30, 2017 at 10:45 am 0

Second Lady Karen Pence is scheduled to appear on Arlington community radio station WERA next week.

Pence will join a show hosted by citizens group Embracing Arlington Arts to discuss art therapy, the group’s chairwoman said. The show will air Tuesday, December 5 at 3 p.m. and will raise awareness of the role art therapy plays as a mental health treatment, we’re told.

Pence has started a blog about her efforts to spread the word about art therapy, and posts regularly on Twitter about its positive impact on veterans, those fighting cancer and children suffering from mental illness, among others.

“I am so thrilled to not only be able to chat with Mrs. Pence, but also to discuss such an important topic as art therapy — her policy priority as Second Lady,” Janet Kopenhaver, chair of Embracing Arlington Arts, said in a statement.

According to the American Art Therapy Association, art therapy is an “integrative mental health and human services profession that enriches the lives of individual, families and communities through active art-making, creative process, applied psychological theory and human experience within a psychotherapeutic relationship.”

The association said it can help improve cognitive functions, foster self-esteem and self-awareness, cultivate resilience, enhance social skills and reduce/resolve conflicts and distress.

Official White House photo by Allaina Parton

by ARLnow.com November 30, 2017 at 10:05 am 0

Catalytic converters were stolen from at least three vehicles parked in Arlington earlier this week.

The thefts were discovered by the vehicle owners Monday and reported to police. Among the locations where the cars were parked, according to police:

  • LARCENY FROM AUTO, 2017-11270145, 200 block of N. Thomas Street
  • LARCENY FROM AUTO, 2017-11270156, 2700 block of 16th Street S.
  • LARCENY FROM AUTO, 2017-11270161, 1300 block of S. Cleveland Street

“There is no suspect description and the investigation is ongoing by our Auto Theft Unit,” said Arlington County Police Department spokeswoman Ashley Savage.

At least two catalytic converter thefts were reported in and around the Arlington Village neighborhood near Columbia Pike, leading some residents there to contact ARLnow.com.

One of the victims told us that the pricey auto part was “hacked out from [our] undercarriages during the afternoon.”

Another resident told ARLnow.com that there was “suspicious activity” in the neighborhood.

“There had been other suspicious activity that day including and van and car with an individual inside each sitting with the car running until a resident came out and they both quickly pulled away,” the resident said.

Savage, however, noted that police had not received any reports of suspicious activity. In a statement, Savage and ACPD urged residents to call police when they see something suspicious.

Citizens are reminded to contact police immediately by calling the Emergency Communication Center at 703-558-2222 or 9-1-1 in an emergency, if they observe suspicious activity. Citizens are most well-acquainted with what activity may be suspicious in their neighborhoods and communities. When reporting suspicious individuals or vehicles to the Emergency Communication Center, the following information is helpful:

  • Vehicle Descriptions – Make / Model / Color / License Plate Number / Last Known Location and Direction of Travel
  • Subject Descriptions – Gender / Race / Height / Weight / Hair / Eyes / Clothing (Top to Bottom – Hats, Shirts, Pants, Shoes), Distinguishing Characteristics – Facial Hair, Jewelry, Scars, Marks, Tattoos, Distinctive Accent or Gait, Last Known Location and Direction / Method of Travel (Foot / Bike / Car / Metro / Bus)

by ARLnow.com November 30, 2017 at 9:15 am 0

Hot Item for the Holidays: E-ZPass — With tolling set to begin on what are now the I-66 HOT lanes, stores in Arlington and elsewhere in Northern Virginia are having trouble keeping E-ZPass transponders in stock, particularly the E-ZPass Flex devices that will allow carpoolers to continue to use I-66 for free. [WJLA]

W&OD Trail Changes Discussed — Officials are considering options for separating cyclists from those on foot on the W&OD Trail. “I love the potential separation,” Arlington County Board member John Vihstadt is quoted as saying. “I think that will be well-received by both sets of users.” [InsideNova]

Dad Speaks Out After W-L Grad Son ODs — “As an admiral I helped run the most powerful military on Earth, but I couldn’t save my son from the scourge of opioid addiction,” writes retired Adm. James Winnefeld, in an Atlantic article entitled “No Family Is Safe From This Epidemic.” Jonathan Winnefeld, a Washington-Lee High School grad, died in Denver this past September “after a long and honorable battle with addiction.” [The Atlantic, Legacy, Denver Post]

More on Accessory Dwelling Vote — A GGW writer argues that while the Arlington County Board is to be commended for allowing the creation of basement apartments that can be rented out, it punted on the issue of backyard cottages at its Tuesday meeting. The Board’s action on so-called Accessory Dwelling Units included instructing the County Manager to study setbacks from the property line for detached accessory structures before any are approved under new rules.  [Greater Greater Washington]

New Incentive for Sustainable Buildings — “Arlington County will pioneer Virginia’s first Commercial-Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) program–a public-private partnership to provide affordable, long-term financing for projects to improve the energy or water efficiency of commercial buildings in the county.” [Arlington County]

DCA Tweets at Teigen — Model and social media personality Chrissy Teigen told followers yesterday that she left “a very large mom bra” under her seat on a flight that arrived at a D.C. area airport. Reagan National Airport’s official Twitter account responded by recommending that Teigen stop by the Spanx store in the airport for a replacement. [Twitter]

‘Age in Place’ Tax Deferral Questioned — Mortgage and title companies are reportedly not big fans of Arlington’s Real Estate Tax Relief Program, which allows older residents who meet certain income requirements to defer property tax payments until the home is sold. The system has sometimes sprung large tax bills on unsuspecting heirs, real estate agents and mortgage settlement officers. [Falls Church News-Press]

Flickr pool photo by Michael Coffman

by Rachel Sadon November 30, 2017 at 8:35 am 0

Photo by Mike Maguire

It’s looking like Audi Field won’t be ready for the beginning of the season, updates on Bei Bei’s bowel movements, where Washingtonians like to bicycle and run, and other news of the day in the District.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor November 29, 2017 at 6:00 pm 0

The Holiday Season. It’s the most wonderful time of the year — until it isn’t, because of crowds, long checkout lines, surly service and competitive parking games.

Avoid all that and come to Lee Heights Shops to actually enjoy your holiday shopping.

Our shops, restaurants and cafes specialize in individual attention and personal service — with sales staffs that truly know their merchandise and customer base — and want to help you find the right thing.

7 Easy Ways to Put the HO HO HO in your Holiday Shopping at Lee Heights Shops

  1. What’s the “it” gift for kids is this year? Believe it or not, it’s Slime. Barstons Child’s Play has a full section of ready-made slime and slime making kits (yes, that is actually a thing). Fortunately the slime is conveniently located right next to one of this season’s other hot gift themes — unicorns. From Legos to board games and everything in between, the Barstons’ elves will help you find the right gift for children of all ages.
  2. Holiday baking — who has time? And who wants to clean up? Pick up some freshly baked cookies, and we won’t tell if you pass them off as homemade — and don’t forget your holiday pies, cakes and other delectable edibles. One of Pastries by Randolph’s Yule Logs makes a tasty centerpiece and a delicious dessert.
  3.  Speaking of pies, everyone likes pecan, pumpkin and apple — but don’t forget the artisanal pizza pies at Upper Crust Pizzeria. Stop in to fortify yourself with a slice — or take a whole pizza home — bam! Dinner is done! Leave a roasted red pepper, bacon and blue cheese beauty by the fire and see if Santa doesn’t up his game this year.
  4. Feeling bewildered about selecting a gift for the women in your life? This is where small shops with personal service really trump the big malls. Turn to the experts at Lemoncello Boutique, Facets JewelryRandom Harvest Home Furnishings and Waste Knot Needlepoint for help in selecting the perfect gift — from va-va-va-voom to blissfully comfy-cozy; from sparkling earrings to lovely necklaces; and tasteful clever ornaments for the home. The needlework experts at Waste Knot Needle point will help you select the perfect canvas and threads for the stitcher in your life. (Gift cards available, too.)
  5. Your celebration won’t be complete without Arrowine’s bubbly champagne, the perfect wine pairing for your feast and craft beers. And don’t forget to linger at their charcuterie and cheese counters to round out your party platters.
  6. Take a break with a relaxing lunch at Cassatt’s Cafe (take-out available) and everyone can agree on the Peruvian chicken at Crisp & Juicy or tasty tacos and burritos from Chipotle. Grab a cup of coffee for fuel to keep going from Starbucks.
  7. What takes the J out of Joy more than spending eons trying to find a parking spot? Any sugarplums dancing in your head will likely be replaced with a black cloud and simmering discontent before you even begin the task of holiday shopping. Lee Heights Shops has ample parking in front and behind. Easy, free parking — what a luxury.

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