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Unleash Your Inner Film Critic

by ARLnow.com June 9, 2010 at 3:28 pm 1,032 0

Arlington Independent Media and the D.C. Film Salon are holding a live script reading tomorrow, with feedback provided by local professionals and amateur film critics.

Hear screenplays written by budding (and brave) local screenwriters — then offer gratuitous praise or withering (constructive) criticism.

The colorful list of screenplays to be read include “Plus One,” about a retired couple who “attempt” to have a threesome, and “BETA VHS R.I.P.” about a Betamax salesman whose world is turned upside down in 1982 when a Japanese salesman comes into town with a VHS player.

Anyone planning to attend is asked to RSVP here. It’s free and organizers say the public is welcome to participate.

The reading is being held at Arlington Independent Media HQ (2701-C Wilson Boulevard, next to Comcast). Doors open at 7:00.

See a list of the screenplays to be read, after the jump.

“Tell” by Alan Williamson:

TELL is a character-driven crime thriller about Tell Hopkins, a small-time crook who made a big-time score when he stole $250,000 in cash. But Tell then discovered stealing it was the easy part. The hard part was keeping his partner, his ex-wife, his parole officer and two dirty cops from stealing it from him.

“Old Eggs” by Rebecca Bredholt:

A seasoned anchorwoman must return home to help her younger sister give birth to her third child, and ask her to be a surrogate. In a family where everyone puts themselves first, just getting to the question proves to be more difficult than hearing the answer.

“Plus One” by Anthony M. Greene:

A retired couple attempt to have a threesome.

“Knife to a Gunfight” by Gemal Woods:

Shot in the head and left for dead, the surviving, streetwise Kirk McCants seeks out the origin of the bullet, only to find himself defenseless against a knife.

“BETA VHS R.I.P.” by Chris Sheridan:

It’s 1982 and Jerry Little is the world’s top Betamax salesman. But his dominance and kingsize ego are about to take a tumble when a Japanese salesman arrives at an annual convention introducing something called “VHS”.

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