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by Chris Teale September 25, 2017 at 12:45 pm 0

Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Just eight months after its launch, cybersecurity firm BluVector marked the latest phase of its growth by cutting the ribbon on its new Ballston office last week.

Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D), Virginia Secretary of Technology Karen Jackson and Arlington County Board chair Jay Fisette joined BluVector CEO Kris Lovejoy to mark the occasion last Tuesday (September 19) with more than 100 attendees. Lovejoy received a “Key to the County” to recognize BluVector’s work so far.

Now with around 70 employees in Arlington’s unofficial “cyber corridor,” BluVector built an early-warning system to detect network hacks electronically. The software monitors the network, analyzes data for threats and responds to hacks by creating a profile of a threat then responds automatically.

“We live in an age where cyberattacks on our critical infrastructure are a real threat,” McAuliffe said in a statement. “But we are proud to have Virginia-based companies like BluVector leading the way to detect – and confront – evolving threats with technological solutions that can be applied here, nationally, and even around the world.”

Lovejoy said those threats have evolved from the early days of the internet, when hackers would look to steal data and then sell it on the black market to make money in economically deprived parts of the world like Eastern Europe. Now, she said, hackers are motivated by what she described as “social and political reasons.”

“It’s no longer, ‘I’m going to steal your data,'” Lovejoy said. “It’s now, ‘I’m going to destroy your systems. I’m going to cause you harm. I’m going to shut down that hospital. I’m going to shut down that grid.’ That to me is the most significant change: the statistical increase in the type of attack has been leading toward the more destructive, and that to me is really quite frightening.”

But Lovejoy said BluVector’s position in Arlington’s so-called “cyber corridor” should help it continue to recruit talented people. She said the combination of the county being a desirable place to live, its location close to many colleges and universities and the fact that people leave defense and intelligence jobs at the Pentagon and wish to transition into the private sector make it a perfect place to be in cybersecurity.

“We do the best we can, and we think we’ve done a good job creating a cyber corridor here,” Fisette said.

Already, BluVector is looking to expand to Japan and South Korea as well as parts of Europe. Lovejoy said the company will also continue to grow in North America, having had the Virginia Information Technologies Agency as one of its first clients. VITA provides IT services to other state agencies, including cybersecurity.

“It has been a great opportunity for us,” Jackson said. “Government doesn’t have many opportunities to be innovative and creative, but this just works.”

And in the company’s expansive, open-plan office with views of the Ballston skyline and beyond, Lovejoy said BluVector is in the perfect place to keep growing.

“There’s not a lot of hierarchy here. There’s military hierarchy, but it’s hierarchy for a purpose,” she said. “We live those values, and I think this office physically manifests what we’re all about. This is about people making a difference. We have a mission and we’re going to succeed in that mission in an area that’s family-friendly, that’s accessible to education, that’s highly cerebral, is motivated by purpose.”

Photo No. 1 via BluVector.

by ARLnow.com September 25, 2017 at 11:45 am 0

Arlington County Police are investigating a sexual battery against a female driver for a ride-hailing app.

The woman was driving a male passenger in the Bluemont area early Sunday morning when the man touched her inappropriately and then got out of the car and fled on foot.

More on the incident and the suspect from Monday’s daily ACPD crime report:

SEXUAL BATTERY, 2017-09240025, 5200 block of Wilson Boulevard. At approximately 1:12 a.m. on September 24, police were dispatched to the report of a sexual assault that had just occurred. Upon arrival, it was determined that while operating as a rideshare driver, the female victim was inappropriately touched by a male passenger. Following the assault, the male suspect exited the vehicle and fled the scene on foot in an unknown direction. Officers canvassed the area with negative results. The suspect is described as a white male, approximately 5’7-5’8 tall with a thin build. He has blonde hair, a red beard and was last seen wearing a white shirt and light colored shorts. The investigation is ongoing.

by Chris Teale September 25, 2017 at 11:00 am 0

“Arlington has a drug problem.”

That’s the message from a flyer for a community town hall event next month focused on “how drugs and the opioid epidemic are affecting our community.” Arlington County may be in many ways a unique community, but it is not immune to the scourge of drugs.

Attendees at the town hall, set for Thursday, October 12 from 7-8:30 p.m. at Arlington Central Library (1015 N. Quincy Street), will hear from those “serving on the front lines,” including local law enforcement, community leaders and health care providers.

It will include a panel discussion moderated by NBC 4 anchor Jim Handley, a question and answer session with the audience and a keynote address by Virginia Beach School Board member Carolyn Weems, whose daughter died from a prescription drug overdose in 2013.

County government, Arlington Public Schools, the Arlington County Police Department and the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney are collaborating to host the town hall.

It comes after ACPD started conducting K-9 drug searches after hours in APS high schools and later said there had been 18 drug arrests on APS grounds during the first five months of the year.

by ARLnow.com September 25, 2017 at 10:00 am 0

The Little Beet is opening its new Rosslyn location at 1800 N. Lynn Street today.

The fast-casual vegetarian restaurant is the New York-based company’s second in the D.C. area. Following today’s planned 11 a.m. opening, the eatery is expected to be open for breakfast, lunch and dinner on weekdays. (It will be open for just lunch and dinner on weekends.)

Over the weekend, The Little Beet held a soft opening and staff training session, serving free food to anyone who wandered in.

More from a press release, below.

Acclaimed fast casual restaurant concept, The Little Beet, is proud to announce its newest location opens today at 11am in Arlington, VA, just outside Washington, DC.

The latest addition to The Little Beet family is located at 1800 North Lynn Street in the base of Rosslyn’s new Central Place residential development.

“We are extremely excited to open our second DC-area location today,” says Andy Duddleston, Managing Partner of The Little Beet. “Rosslyn is a vibrant community with amazing energy, making it the perfect fit for The Little Beet.  We look forward to welcoming in area residents and business professionals alike to enjoy our healthy, seasonal menu for breakfast, lunch or dinner.”

Headquartered in New York City, with seven locations in total, The Little Beet opened its first DC outpost in November 2015 near Dupont Circle.

The vegetable-focused menu is 100% gluten free, mostly vegan, always fresh, and void of refined sugar.  The culinary team, led by Chef Gabe Kennedy, draws inspiration from global flavors and incorporates exciting, nutrient-dense ingredients into every tasty bite that benefit both body and mind.

At the new Rosslyn location, guests can select from an array of composed Chef Made Bowls with three base options including mixed greens, ancient grains or spirulina-flecked brown rice.  Guests can also get creative and choose the Make Your Own option featuring a selection of cool and warm vegetables (acorn squash, shaved Brussels sprouts, roasted kale, bok choy, etc.), high-quality proteins (beet falafel, grilled avocado, tofu, chicken, steak or salmon), house-made sauces (piquillo garlic, turmeric tahini, salsa verde, etc.), and flavorful garnishes (hibiscus pickled onions, turmeric toasted almonds or super seeds).

In addition to lunch and dinner offerings, breakfast is available Monday-Friday from 7am-10am.  The breakfast menu features an assortment of chef-made bowls, egg sandwiches, yogurt parfaits, and beverages such as Almond Banana Cold Brew, Chaga Chai Tea, and more.

To add a unique creative touch to the new location, The Little Beet collaborated with Virginia-based artist Troy Summerell (aka, OnieTonie) for a custom, hand-painted mural.  With “fruits and veggies” as the theme, Troy’s bold, playful artwork is on grand display in the main dining area for guests to visually savor.

The Little Beet is committed to sustainability and eco-friendly practices.  Like its siblings, this new location features energy-efficient kitchen equipment and lighting throughout.  Plus, packaging is recyclable and biodegradable, and a composting program is utilized.

The Little Beet’s Rosslyn location is open Monday-Friday from 7am-9pm, and Saturday and Sunday from Noon-8pm.  Catering and delivery services are both offered.

Founded in 2014 in New York City, The Little Beet is owned-and-operated by NYC-based restaurant group Aurify Brands. With seven locations throughout Manhattan, Long Island, and Washington, DC, The Little Beet strives to serve real food deliciously.  The vegetable-forward, seasonal menu is 100% gluten free, mostly vegan, always fresh, and void of refined sugar. The culinary team, led by Chef Gabe Kennedy, draws inspiration from global flavors and incorporates exciting, nutrient-rich ingredients into every tasty bite that benefit both body and mind. All ingredients are carefully sourced from local farmers and food purveyors you can trust–good food never tasted so great!

by ARLnow.com September 25, 2017 at 9:00 am 0

Middle School Redistricting on Tap — Following a number of meetings and other processes designed to solicit public feedback, the Arlington School Board is expected to approve new middle school boundaries in December, to take effect for the 2019-2020 school year when a sixth county middle school is set to open. Past school boundary change processes have often proved controversial. [InsideNova]

Four Mile Run Restoration Project Complete — Local elected officials and community activists celebrated the completion of the Four Mile Run Restoration Project on Saturday. The project, which was years in the making, revitalized the shoreline of Four Mile Run from just south of I-395 to the Potomac and included trail improvements and public art. [Arlington County, WTOP]

New Beneficiaries for Turkey Trot — The annual Arlington Turkey Trot 5K has some new nonprofit beneficiaries. Organized by Christ Church of Arlington, the race will no longer benefit Doorways for Women and Families — “in light of Doorways’ projected success to meet its current goal to raise $10 million to strengthen and expand its services” — and will this year benefit Offender Aid and Restoration and Christian group Young Life of South Arlington. That’s in addition to repeat beneficiaries AFAC, A-SPAN, Arlington Thrive and Bridges to Independence. [Arlington Turkey Trot]

by Chris Teale September 22, 2017 at 8:00 pm 0

It promises to be a busy weekend in Arlington County, with Clarendon Day and the Prio Bangla multicultural street festival both set for Saturday.

Also of note: Clarendon Day’s traditional 5K and 10K races down Wilson Blvd will take place on Sunday. Those in the area can expect significant road closures.

These were our top five most read stories this week:

  1. Man Stabbed ‘Multiple Times’ Along N. Glebe Road
  2. Silver Diner Coming to Ballston
  3. Gas Station Targeted By Credit Card Skimmers Again
  4. Arlington Allocates $100,000 for Legal Aid to Immigrants Facing Deportation
  5. Bed and Breakfast Plan Denied for ‘Pershing Manor’ Mansion

And these received the most comments:

  1. Arlington Allocates $100,000 for Legal Aid to Immigrants Facing Deportation
  2. Jesse Jackson to Visit Nauck Today
  3. Peter’s Take: Board Wisely Rejects Staff Proposal on Williamsburg Field Lights
  4. Morning Notes (September 21)
  5. Letter: ‘Pet of the Week’ Should Not Glorify Bad Dog Behavior

Feel free to discuss anything of local interest in the comments below. Have a great weekend!

Flickr pool photo by Chris Guyton.

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 5:50 pm 0

Update at 7 p.m. — Power has been partially restored and only 318 Dominion customers are reported to be without electricity.

Earlier: A large swath of Clarendon and Courthouse is currently without power.

The outage happened around 5:40 p.m. and may have been accompanied by a mild power surge. Arlington County offices were affected, and are being powered by generators, according to a police dispatch. Numerous businesses in the area in the dark and traffic lights are out up and down Wilson and Clarendon Blvds.

Police are setting up cones to direct traffic at the busiest intersections.

According to Dominion, just over 1,700 customers are without power following an issue with a power substation. Crews have been dispatched and power is expected to be restored between 8-11 p.m.

https://twitter.com/ArlingtonVaPD/status/911349922821263368

by Chris Teale September 22, 2017 at 4:30 pm 0

Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) announced today he will send 120 soldiers from the Virginia National Guard to the U.S. Virgin Islands to help with relief after Hurricane Maria.

The 120 soldiers are assigned to the Staunton-based 116th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, and will deploy in the next week to mission command headquarters. Up to 400 more will follow to conduct humanitarian assistance, clear roads and give out supplies to citizens.

It is the 10th time Virginia has coordinated an aid mission at the state level, not including efforts by religious and nonprofit organizations based in the Commonwealth.

The Category 5 storm destroyed homes and boats docked on the three islands. Four people were reported dead across the U.S. Virgin Islands; the power grid and other infrastructure was devastated and may take months to restore; and residents are in serious need of aid, which was slow to arrive after the hurricane passed.

“Virginia is ready to help communities facing the long road to recovery from the devastation wrought on their cities and towns by the recent hurricanes,” McAuliffe said in a statement. “Commonwealth officials, the Virginia National Guard, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and other agencies remain in close contact with our counterparts in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. We will continue to offer Virginia’s assistance for short and long-term recovery.”

More from a Governor’s Office press release after the jump:

(more…)

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 3:30 pm 0

Scott Parker is part of a group of partners who together have built something of a nightlife empire in Arlington.

A-Town Bar and Grill, Don Tito and Barley Mac have all been hits along the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor. And now Scott and his partners are getting ready to open (in the next couple of weeks) The G.O.A.T., a new sports bar right across from the Clarendon Metro station in the former Hard Times Cafe space.

Scott has helped to build this empire based on Sunday Fundays and happy hour drink specials all while having a somewhat unique personal background for a bar impresario: he does not drink.

On this week’s 26 Square Miles podcast, we sat down with Scott to discuss how he achieved success after success in the notoriously difficult restaurant industry, what to expect with the G.O.A.T., what comes next, and what he thinks of the current state of the Arlington bar and restaurant scene.

Listen below or subscribe to the podcast on iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher or TuneIn.

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

Looking for a home? There are plenty of houses and condos open for viewing this weekend.

Check out the Arlington Realty website for a full list of homes for sale and open houses in Arlington. Here are a few highlights:

820 S. Arlington Mill Drive, 3-301
1 Bed/1 Bath Condo
Agent: Rolfe Kratz
Listed: $180,000
Open: Sunday 1-4 p.m.

 

1904 Key Blvd, #452
2 Bed/1 Bath Condo
Agent: John Seggerman
Listed: $269,900
Open: Sunday 1-4 p.m.

 

4191 S. Four Mile Run Drive, #404
1 Bed/1 Bath Condo
Agent: Jeffrey Jacobs
Listed: $330,000
Open: Saturday 1-3 p.m.

 

4365 Arlington Blvd, #4365
2 Bed/1 Bath Condo
Agent: Nina Landes
Listed: $425,000
Open: Sunday 2-4 p.m.

 

6081 9th Place N.
3 Bed/2 Single Family Home
Agent: Mark Lawter
Listed: $609,900
Open: Sunday 1-3 p.m.

 

500 N. Lombardy Street
4 Bed/3 Bath Single Family Home
Agent: Christine Rich
Listed: $775,000
Open: Sunday 1-4 p.m.

 

2918 18th Street S.
4 Bed/4 Bath Single-Family Home
Agent: Patrick Carosi
Listed: $995,000
Open: Sunday 1-4 p.m.

by Chris Teale September 22, 2017 at 1:30 pm 0

Arlingtonians will have several opportunities to weigh in on the names of new schools and the renaming of existing ones under a plan put forward by Arlington Public Schools staff.

APS is set to undertake a four-step process to discuss its school naming policies, a conversation that will likely include discussion of the name of Washington-Lee High School.

Members of the Arlington School Board announced last month they will reconsider existing school names. That announcement came after the violence in Charlottesville at a white supremacist rally, and a petition for APS to change the name of Washington-Lee High School, named in part for Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Board members will also be looking for names for the building on the former Wilson School site — the future home of the H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program — and the new 1,000-seat middle school on Vacation Lane.

According to a draft plan discussed Thursday night by the Board, the first phase will begin with a committee made up of APS staff.

APS spokeswoman Linda Erdos said that committee will include a “diverse” group of APS staff, including school administrators, central office staff and teachers as well as custodians and bus drivers.

That committee will study the origins of existing school names, put together draft criteria for APS school names and take feedback from the public, including staff, families, students, alumni and community members. Its work is scheduled to be completed “later in the school year,” according to the draft.

The current APS naming criteria offer only two pieces of guidance: (1) that schools can be named “according to geographical or historical relationships in which the site is located,” meaning schools are named for the neighborhood they are located in or the street they are on; and (2) that naming a school for an individual can only be considered after they have been dead for five years.

After that first phase, staff will present a draft recommendation to update APS’ naming criteria to the School Board. The committee will also “be prepared to identify names of APS schools, if any, that may need to be considered for renaming by their respective school communities,” reads the memo outlining the process.

The Board then will take public comment on the updated naming policy and any proposed changes to school names, adopt the policy and if necessary, direct Superintendent Patrick Murphy to begin a renaming process. Finding names for the two new schools could then begin, using the updated criteria.

Board members said the plan, set to be formally approved at a future meeting, is exactly what they were looking for.

“I like the fact that we’re taking baby steps towards this and being very, very thoughtful,” said Nancy Van Doren.

“[Staff has] laid out what we promised, which is a deliberate process,” said Board chair Barbara Kanninen.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor September 22, 2017 at 12:15 pm 0

Weekend Wine and Beer Guide logo

Editor’s Note: This biweekly column is sponsored by Dominion Wine and Beer (107 Rowell Court, Falls Church). It was written by Arash Tafakor.

Simply put, Prosecco is an Italian White Sparkling wine. But many customers do not know exactly what Prosecco is other than it’s Italian, it has bubbles and they like it. 

Prosecco sales have soared in the United States the past 10 years, and in 2013 worldwide sales of Prosecco topped Champagne sales for the first time ever. Prosecco’s light body, citrus flavor profile, off-dry nature and affordable prices make it a much more approachable every day sparkler than Champagne.  

So what is Prosecco? 

Prosecco is made in the Northeastern regions of Italy with a grape named Glera. Dating back thousands of years to the Ancient Romans, the Glera grape was widely used to make still white wine until the 20th century when secondary fermentation was discovered. 

Unlike Champagne, Prosecco is made with a method of secondary fermentation (what creates the bubbles) called the Charmat method. Instead of the labor intensive and time consuming Champagne process of secondary fermentation occurring in the bottle, Prosecco undergoes secondary fermentation in large stainless steel tanks which greatly reduces costs. The end product is a vibrant, fruity, low in alcohol, affordable sparkling wine that is meant to be consumed young and fresh. 

For around 10-15 dollars you can get a Prosecco that offers delicate fruit and enticing aromas. On the palate you can expect Prosecco to deliver ripe assorted apple, pear, citrus and often some nutty flavors. Since most Prosecco is on the drier side and inexpensive they are also perfect for mixing with orange juice, grapefruit juice and especially peach puree to make a famous Italian Bellini. Next time you are hosting a brunch and need a mixing sparkling wine for Mimosas, the smart choice is Prosecco. 

You can also pair Prosecco with a variety of foods. Traditionally used as an aperitif or by itself, Prosecco pairs well with most cheeses and light charcuterie as well as seafood, Asian fare, Spicy food and creamy Italian sauces. Prosecco is a very forgiving food friendly sparkling wine option. 

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 11:30 am 0

Brandon Showell, a special education instructional assistant at Arlington’s Kenmore Middle School, is a contestant on the new season of NBC’s The Voice, ARLnow.com has confirmed.

Showell previously auditioned for another singing show, X Factor, with his band 4 Shore, while he was a senior at George Mason University. This time around he’s competing solo.

On the show, Showell will be placed on the team of one of show’s four star coaches, which this year include Adam Levine of Maroon 5, Miley Cyrus, Jennifer Hudson and Blake Shelton.

It is shaping up to be a big year for Showell, who married fellow Kenmore instructional assistant and GMU graduate Perla Farias over the summer. However, he is not the first person from Kenmore to appear on The Voice — that honor belongs to Samantha Rios, who competed on the Spanish-language version of the show while an eighth-grader at Kenmore in 2015.

The Voice premieres this coming Monday at 8 p.m. on NBC. No word yet on when Showell will first appear on the show.

Courtesy photo

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 10:35 am 0

The following letter was sent to ARLnow.com by Janet R., a Lyon Village resident, in response to our latest Pet of the Week post.

The post noted that Sophie, a black lab mix, loves to “swim, run, jump, get tummy rubs, play with tennis balls, obsessively lick stuff, stalk squirrels, bark at strangers and watch Bravo with mom.”

I wish you would not encourage the “I bark at strangers” thing in your Pet of the Week.

Please encourage lawful behavior and non threatening behaviors.

  • “I poop on stranger’s lawns and my owner doesn’t clean it up.”
  • “I run free off leash and taunt young kids who might also have fears (but me and my owner don’t care). (Playgrounds are nicer than dog parks!)”
  • “I bark incessantly whenever my owner leaves me at home, so our neighbors no longer are on speaking terms because they miss using their porch/open windows in peace.”
  • “Whenever my owner does feel compelled to clean up after me, she leaves the half closed bag in a neighbor’s trash bin (especially those elderly neighbors who leave their trash bins out longer).”
  • “I especially love the long extended leash on crowded sidewalks. My owner and I think it’s okay to trip elderly with this, because I like to feel free. I’m an explorer!”

Seriously, all of these things have happened to me in Arlington County, and sadly, I could go on and on.

You need to try to HELP this situation, not hurt it. Please remind dog owners that the right of pet ownership comes with serious responsibilities. Especially to their neighbors. As our neighborhood association writes in every newsletter, this is difficult to enforce, but is an increasing problem. (Check out the exponential growth in dog ownership).

Rescue the neighbors of poorly trained dog owners!!! You play a role here, Arlington Now.

Leash and under control. Clean up poop and use own trash can. Control barking. You never know what crises your neighbors may be dealing with on their own. Show compassion for humans, too.

ARLnow.com occasionally publishes letters about issues of local interest. To submit your thoughts for consideration, please email [email protected]. Letters may be edited for content and brevity.

by ARLnow.com September 22, 2017 at 9:40 am 0

There is a literal north-south divide in Arlington: Route 50, as it runs from Fairfax County to Fort Myer.

But besides the difference in addresses, there is also a bit of a socioeconomic divide separating the two sides of the highway. Neighborhoods south of Route 50 tend to be less wealthy and more diverse than their counterparts in the northern reaches of Arlington.

Arlington’s north-south divide has been subject to quite a few think pieces over the years. One can argue that the inexorable upward march of property prices throughout Arlington has made the divide less pronounced, though it is still there.

Rather than add another think piece to the mix, today we were just wondering: in which half of Arlington do you live?

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