Arlington, VA

This regularly-scheduled sponsored column is written by the Arlington Initiative to Rethink Energy team (AIRE). This county program helps you make smart energy decisions that save you money and leaves a lighter footprint on the environment.

Home insulation has a significantly greater impact on your home’s energy use and comfort than new windows or doors.

Believe it or not, 9 out of 10 homes in the U.S. are under-insulated. That means that you most likely live in one of them. Older Arlington homes were built when insulation was expensive and fuel was cheap. Many Arlington homes were built with no insulation and are uncomfortably hot in the summer, cold in the winter and have uneven temperatures room-to-room and floor-to-floor.

Do you have uneven temperatures throughout your home? What are you waiting for!? Join other Arlingtonians that already weatherized their homes and are enjoying the benefits of year-round comfort and lower utility bills.

You can also take advantage of the tax credit for insulation before the end of the year!

In most cases, the fixes aren’t complex and the cost will likely be less than you expect. In just one day you can have your home insulated and be comfortable year after year.

Unsure where to start? Check out this list of contractors who participated in previous County programs. Give an insulation contractor a call today to get an estimate.

The sooner you act the more comfortable your home will be.

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ARLnow Weekend Discussion

For much the this week, the sun was obscured behind a haze of smoke wafting in from the West Coast wildfires.

As the week has gone on, the haze has dissipated. Despite the calamities the world has faced this year, it is good to know that, with due time, the sun will always come back out eventually.

Here are the most-read articles this week on ARLnow:

  1. County Board Votes to Discontinue Sidewalk Crowding Ordinance
  2. French Pastry Shop Now Open in Rosslyn
  3. Purple Lounge Back in Business After Liquor License Restored
  4. New Rosslyn Development Marks Construction Milestone
  5. County Board Expresses Support for Changing County Logo
  6. Board Approves Gun Ban in County Buildings and Parks
  7. Neighborhood Spotlight: The Best Tacos in Arlington
  8. First Day of Early Voting Attracts Long Line in Arlington
  9. County Board OKs New $14 Million, Amazon-Funded Park in Pentagon City

For those celebrating tonight, Shanah tovah.

Also: RIP summer of 2020. Hello, fall.

Feel free to discuss any of the above, or anything else of local interest, in the comments. Have a nice weekend!

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Three days after members of the Arlington County Board expressed support for changing the county’s logo, officials outlined a process for changing it, the county seal and, potentially, names of some local roads and places.

The logo change comes after a push from the Arlington branch of the NAACP, which earlier this summer called the illustration of Arlington House a “racist plantation symbol” that “divides, rather than unites us.”

At the Board’s Tuesday evening meeting, County Manager Mark Schwartz presented a plan to review county symbols and names over the next few months.

The review will include “gathering perspectives on race and equity in Arlington,” and examining county symbols, street names and facility names that may be associated with systemic racism or oppression. The review will “build on this fall’s community process to update the County’s Historic Preservation Master Plan,” according to a county press release.

Schwartz said he will present in December a summary of community feedback, as well as recommendations to the Board for next steps.

In introducing the topic, County Board Chair Libby Garvey said that equity and the county budget are “the two most important things we’re tackling as a Board.” She, along with the four other members of the Board, reiterated their support for changing the county logo.

While newly-elected Board member Takis Karantonis said he agreed with local NAACP leader Julius Spain, Sr.’s call to retire Arlington House as the county’s logo as soon as possible, he acknowledged that the overall process of choosing a new logo and replacing the old logo on most county equipment and properties would “probably take several years.”

Board member Katie Cristol said the logo and some names currently in use locally “have come to feel so out of step with our current values in Arlington County,” while Board member Matt de Ferranti said he wanted to ensure the process of evaluating and changing them was thoughtful and inclusive.

Christian Dorsey, the lone Black member of the Board, said his support for changing the logo came down to the 1972 renaming of Arlington House by Congress as “Arlington House: the Robert E. Lee Memorial,” in honor of the Confederate general and one-time occupant of the historic home on the grounds of what became Arlington National Cemetery.

While some may believe Arlington House to be a symbol of slavery, Dorsey said, others see it as a symbol of the repudiation of the Confederacy, given that it was seized during the Civil War in order to serve as a final resting place for Union war dead. The 1972 renaming, however, “takes all nuance out of the equation.”

“Should a national memorial to Robert E. Lee be the official symbol of Arlington County?” Dorsey asked. “For me it’s a clear no. Period, full stop.”

Dorsey said that the logo change and renaming process will need to find a way to try to unite people who are “in different places along the journey,” but names that honor people who “actively promoted systemic oppression” have to go.

The county should also consider naming some things that are currently unnamed in order “to elevate the contributions of women, people of color, indigenous peoples, that have been suppressed in the telling of our country’s and our community’s history,” according to Dorsey. At the same time, he said, the county should “make sure that fiscal and human resources are not diverted from doing the work to address systemic racism” by the logo change and renaming processes.

(The county, through a local nonprofit, is currently in the process of renaming Lee Highway.)

More on the logo change and renaming process, from a county press release, below.

Read More

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Address: 1218 Perry William Drive
Neighborhood: Everymay (McLean)
Listed: $1,725,000

Captivating home in sought-after Evermay with heated, saltwater pool! Beautifully updated, and thoughtfully designed to offer all the conveniences for today’s living.

There’s space for working from home, enjoying a Staycation while sipping beverages pool-side or under the covered patio, cooking for family or a small gathering of friends, and finding quiet spaces throughout. Find your inner chef while enjoying the spacious eat-in kitchen, fully updated with high-end appliances.

This turnkey home features five generously sized bedrooms, three are located on the upper level with two full baths including the primary bedroom with ensuite bath and private balcony, while on the lower level you will find two additional bedrooms and a Jack-n-Jill bath.

The Evermay neighborhood is 2.5 miles to the Chain Bridge and D.C., 2 miles to Downtown McLean, and close to Tysons with plenty of shopping and dining options.

Listed by:
Steve Wydler
Wydler Brothers of Compass
703-348-6326
[email protected]
wydlerbrothers.com

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Burke Basics | Introduction to Admissions

We will start with an introduction to Edmund Burke School, followed by an overview of the Admissions process for Grades 6-12 and how you can get to know our school and our students.

An new tenant in Ballston helps adults in need of a boost to establish foundational computer skills, ultimately expanding their career opportunities.

Called Computer CORE, the educational nonprofit offers courses in Google Suite, email, internet basics, computer security, community college math and similar fields to underserved adults. The classes help workers increase their salary by $10k on average.

The new educational facility will be located in a 3,500 square foot space in the Ballston Exchange complex, across Wilson Blvd from Ballston Quarter mall. The Ballston Business Improvement District coordinated the agreement between Computer CORE and Jamestown, the building’s owner, a press release said.

Overall, Computer CORE has around 150 students, roughly 70 of which will be able to use the new space, according to a spokesperson. In terms of group demographics, around 70% of all enrolled students identify as women and 95% are people of color, according to the organization’s website.

Though the center is only set to remain in the Ballston Exchange through the end of 2020, there is a possibility to extend the agreement, according to a spokesperson.

The location was partially chosen because of its proximity to a Metro station and Ballston’s nearby amenities, Tina Leone, the Ballston BID’s CEO said in the press release.

Computer CORE also offers help with resume review, the job search process and interview prep. Program applicants must live in the Northern Virginia area, be at least 18 years old, be motivated to find a job and have demonstrated need for the classes, according to the website.

Currently, 350 other students are on a waiting list to attend classes, the spokesperson said.

Photo courtesy Ballston BID

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Looking for a home? There are plenty of houses and condos open for viewing this weekend.

Check out the Arlington Realty website for a full list of homes for sale and open houses in Arlington. Here are a few highlights:

3012 N. Oakland Street
4 BD/5 BA, 1 half bath single-family home
Agent: Re/Max West End
Listed: $1,950,000
Open: Sunday 2-4 p.m.

 

1722 S. Arlington Ridge Road
3 BD/2 BA, 1 half bath single-family home
Agent: Compass
Listed: $1,490,000
Open: Sunday 2-4 p.m.

 

2518 N. Columbus Street
4 BD/3 BA single-family home
Agent: Keller Williams Realty
Listed: $998,000
Open: Saturday 1-4 p.m.

 

125 N. Oakland Street
3 BD/1 BA, 1 half bath single-family home
Agent: Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.
Listed: $895,000
Open: Sunday 2-4 p.m.

 

851 N. Glebe Road #1705
2 BD/2 BA condo
Agent: Century 21 New Millennium
Listed: $739,900
Open: Saturday 12-4:30 p.m.

 

2174 N. Brandywine Street
2 BD/2 BA, 1 half bath villa/townhouse
Agent: Compass
Listed: $624,900
Open: Saturday 2-4 p.m.

 

1915 S. Kenmore Street
4 BD/2 BA villa/townhouse
Agent: Kw Metro Center
Listed: $529,900
Open: Sunday 1-3 p.m.

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The Italian restaurant that’s coming to the former Alto Fumo space (2909 Wilson Blvd) in Clarendon is a few weeks away from opening.

Mazaro is the name of the new restaurant, which was first touted in window coverings declaring that “Italy is Coming!” The coverings are now off and interior work has largely wrapped up, according to Aziza Naji, a partner in the restaurant and 14-year veteran of the industry. She said her partner is a local commercial property owner with no prior restaurant experience.

Naji described Mazaro as a modern Italian restaurant that will offer classic Italian cuisine and Neapolitan pizza baked in specialized, wood-fired ovens imported from Italy. The restaurant will have both indoor and outdoor seating when it opens, we’re told.

Mazaro just applied for a Virginia ABC license to serve beer, wine and cocktails, and expects to open once the application is approved — perhaps later this month or in early October, according to Naji.

The restaurant does not yet have a working website, though one is currently under development.

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For the past two weeks, the seven-day moving average of new coronavirus cases in Arlington has kept a fairly tight range. Today, however, it is seeing something of a bump up.

Twenty-eight new cases were reported overnight, the highest one-day total since Aug. 28, bringing the seven-day average to 17. The seven-day total is now 119, after hovering around 100 all week.

Since Monday, one new COVID-related death and four new hospitalizations have been reported in Arlington. The seven-day total of new hospitalizations currently stands at 10.

The cumulative total of cases, hospitalizations and deaths since the start of the pandemic is now 3,819, 491, and 146, respectively, according to Virginia Dept. of Health data.

Over the past month, meanwhile, the age of new COVID-19 cases in the county has continued to skew younger, with the 0-9, 10-19 and 20-29 age groups showing the highest proportional increase since Aug. 19.

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