Arlington, VA

A man allegedly left a local restaurant without paying, shoved a restaurant employee, and used anti-Asian slurs, according to police.

The incident happened shortly before 6 p.m. on Tuesday along Crystal City’s restaurant row, on the 500 block of 23rd Street S.

Restaurant employees told police they confronted the man after he didn’t pay the bill, but he kept walking away. The man also allegedly pushed an employee to the ground while another recorded the encounter on video.

The alleged assault is being investigated by Arlington County police. The employees, who are of Asian descent, told officers that the man used racial slurs, which has been referred by ACPD to Virginia State Police as a possible hate crime.

More from a police press release, below.

The Arlington County Police Department’s Homicide/Robbery Unit is investigating the assault of a restaurant employee and is seeking the public’s assistance identifying the suspect who was captured on cell phone image.

At approximately 5:54 p.m. on May 4, police were dispatched to the 500 block of 23rd Street S. for the report of an assault. Upon arrival, it was determined that the suspect left a restaurant without paying his bill. Two employees approached the suspect outside the establishment and requested he return to pay. The suspect continued walking away and when one employee began recording him, he pushed the other employee to the ground and ran off towards Richmond Highway. The victim of the assault did not require medical treatment.

During the course of the follow-up investigation by detectives, it was alleged that the suspect used racial slurs towards the employees, an Asian male and female. In accordance with Virginia law, this incident has been reported to Virginia State Police as a possible hate crime.

The suspect is described as a white male in his late 20’s to early 30’s with dark brown hair, a light brown beard, approximately 5’9″ to 5’11” tall and weighing between 150 to 160 lbs. He was wearing square rimmed glasses, headphones, a black t-shirt, gray and black sweatpants and black sneakers at the time of the incident.

This remains an active criminal investigation. Anyone with information related to this incident or who can identify the suspect is asked to contact the Arlington County Police Department’s Homicide/Robbery Unit at 703-228-4180 or [email protected] Information may also be reported anonymously through the Arlington County Crime Solvers hotline at 1-866-411-TIPS (8477).

Photos via Arlington County Police Department

This neighborhood is at the heart of one of Virginia’s busiest cities — so how does it remain completely quiet? Join the Keri Shull Team as we share everything you need to know about the Waycroft-Woodlawn neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia!

And, as always, if you have any questions about Arlington real estate, please contact the Keri Shull Team, the #1 top-selling real estate team in the Washington, D.C. area.

NoVA’s Serene Secret

Waycroft-Woodlawn is a serene, suburban neighborhood in Arlington, located just north of the Ballston-Rosslyn Corridor. It’s beloved for its quiet streets, access to D.C. and abundance of beautiful flora.

Due to the tranquil atmosphere and strong community ties, most of the unique things to do in Waycroft-Woodlawn are events hosted by the Civic Association. However, residents can also access dining, entertainment and shopping all throughout the D.C. area thanks to the neighborhood’s proximity to I-66 and the Metro.

A Truly Close Community

Despite being so close to the bustling urban center of Ballston, this locale is a pocket of tranquility. The tree-lined streets and community spirit are protected and upheld by the Waycroft-Woodlawn Civic Association, an organization of community members dedicated to keeping residents safe and happy. Plus, the tight-knit community comes together regularly to host community parties and events — these are the perfect chance to befriend your neighbors or enjoy some family fun throughout the year!

Getting Around Arlington

There is not a Metro stop named for Waycroft-Woodlawn, but that doesn’t mean that residents are out of luck when it comes to public transit.

The neighborhood sits just to the north of the Orange and Silver Lines of the D.C. Metro system. The Ballston-MU Metro station is just a few blocks away from Waycroft-Woodlawn, meaning home owners can easily access the rest of D.C. and NoVA by foot or bike.

If you would rather travel by car, Waycroft-Woodlawn also offers convenient access to some of the main throughways in the D.C. area. I-66 borders the neighborhood on the southern edge, while Glebe Road marks the eastern border of Waycroft-Woodlawn.

Finally, this neighborhood is notable for having great access for cyclists. With a Bike Score of 82, most commutes and daily errands can be accomplished via bike. This is great news for people looking to live on a budget in the Washington D.C. area or skip D.C.’s infamous traffic.

Making the Most of Waycroft-Woodlawn

Home values in Waycroft-Woodlawn are very strong, and the neighborhood is currently seeing appreciation in price, overall. With the trajectory of the housing market in Arlington trending upward, this means purchasing a home in Waycroft-Woodlawn could be a wise financial move for many people.

The properties for sale in Waycroft-Woodlawn offer a nice blend of architectural styles. There are around 500 homes in the neighborhood, many of which were built in the mid-20th century. These houses include classic examples of Cape Cod homes, ramblers, colonials, cottage-style houses and more. There is truly something for everyone in this neighborhood!

Unlike some other neighborhoods near the Orange Line, most of the residents of Waycroft-Woodlawn own their homes. Homeownership is an attractive prospect in this neighborhood for many reasons. Even in Northern Virginia, it’s hard to find a neighborhood that blends peaceful tranquility with urban convenience as well as Waycroft-Woodlawn does.

Finding a Home in Waycroft-Woodlawn

At the Keri Shull Team, we have hundreds of off-market properties that you cannot find online or anywhere else… and we want to give you priority access to these homes before they even go on the market!

The market is red hot in Waycroft-Woodlawn right now, with lots of new construction homes going up in the area, so if you want to find a home in this neighborhood, you need to have every advantage that you can get!

And if you are selling a house in Arlington, it’s more important than ever to make sure you are taking the proper precautions to protect your investment. The best way to do that is to speak with a top-tier real estate agent and create a completely customized home selling strategy.

So what are you waiting for? Just click here to schedule a time for a free, no-pressure consultation with one of our Real Estate Needs Analysts!

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Arlington seems stuck in a relatively slow news cycle, with few significant breaking stories to speak of over the past few weeks, but that may change next week.

First, we have a County Board meeting next weekend that should keep us busy with coverage. Second, these slow cycles never last for long and we’re due for a big story or two. Third, you’ll be seeing a new byline here over the next couple of weeks, and more staffing allows us to cover more local stories.

Despite being a bit slow, there were still plenty of interesting local stories this week. Below are the most-read articles of the week.

  1. Police Investigating Bomb Threat in Crystal City
  2. Pupatella Named One of the Best Pizza Places in Virginia
  3. Pierogi Joint in Ballston Cooks Up Star Wars-Themed Specials
  4. Rodents, Mold, Shoddy Maintenance Plague Affordable Apartment Building
  5. Lower Enrollment Could Help Bail APS Out of $11M+ Deficit
  6. Police: Erratic, Armed Driver Arrested
  7. Morning Notes (May 4)
  8. Pedestrian Walkway Coming to Sidewalk-Less Side of Rosslyn Street
  9. Arlington’s Vaccination Rate Now Higher Than N. Va. Neighbors
  10. Coronavirus Cases and Vaccinations Both Down in Arlington

Feel free to discuss those or other topics of local interest in the comments. Have a nice weekend and, for all the moms out there, happy Mother’s Day!

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This sponsored column is written by Todd Himes, beermonger at Arrowine (4508 Lee Highway). Sign up for the email newsletter and receive exclusive discounts and offers. Order from Arrowine’s expanding online store for curbside pickup.

This week I was lucky enough to find myself over at Nationals Park to watch a game and, for professional purposes, to have a hot dog and beer.

It wasn’t my first trip to the stadium this year, but it was the first time I sat up in the newly reopened 300 level, which was much closer to where I’d say my usual seats are (also from where I saw T-Swizzle back in 2015.) However, the closest District Drafts stand was all the way down by the 100s, and because this beer purchase was for Professional Research Purposes™, I made the walk down and back up, which gave me time to think about sessionable beers.

Session beers are hard to nail down in an exact definition. Originating in British and Irish drinking culture, these beers are characterized by being low in ABV (at Arrowine, we’re aiming for sub 5%) and high in flavor and refreshment. You might find stories of workers being allowed drinking “sessions” while working, a “session” meaning anytime you get together to have more than one beer. And you might think that concept exists so ubiquitously that it doesn’t need to have its origins pinpointed. For many folks in the U.S., before the growth of craft beer in America, this is what all beers were. Even now many of the imperial stout and double IPA drinkers I know will reach for light lagers when extended days of drinking are on the docket.

The walk back up the twisting switchback ramp was even more inspiring with a Port City Optimal Wit and a Right Proper Raised by Wolves in hand. My wife and I always toast Opening Day with an Optimal Wit, since the story goes that it was Port City’s Bill Butcher who did some heavy lobbying to get the District Drafts stands into the park. Plus, it is a delightful beer that I could drink anytime, anyplace. The Raised by Wolves stands out as being packed with flavor, extremely aromatic and, because I had sessions on my mind, the 5% ABV really swayed me. Maybe it was because it was a weeknight. Maybe it was because I was ordering the 23-ounce large size of each. Or maybe it was because of the time I spent this week tagging items in our online store to build out the session beer section of our website. Whatever the reasons, drinking something delicious but not Barrel-Aged-Imperial-Coffee-Marshmallow delicious was the raison d’etre.

Never really going out of style, the concept has made many a push in my time of beermongering. You have a strong British influence that was present in corners of the aughts, the rise of session IPAs that followed the “extreme beer” era and even now the number of large craft producers introducing low calorie, sub-4% IPAs geared toward expanding the audience of craft. Add on top of that the rise of craft lagers that are following the hazy IPA wave that has been washing over the industry, and we might be poised to enter a session renaissance.

If you’ve got a favorite sessionable beer, drop a comment below and look out for it possibly coming to our shelves.

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Gonzaga College High School is thrilled to present the Tony award-winning Spongebob Musical online this weekend!

Three performances will stream “live” on Friday, May 7 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, May 8 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, May 9 at 2:30 p.m. This show is an ocean of fun for the whole family! Watch the preview trailer and purchase tickets at the link above.

Submit your own Community Post here for just $99.

Columbia Pike Progress Luncheon

Support our community with this year’s virtual “luncheon” benefit! Our 2021 Columbia Pike Progress Luncheon will kick off the Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization’s 35th Anniversary year and serve as a celebration of the economic progress of the Pike over the past few decades as well as a look toward the future growth and development planned for the next few years. Our speakers and panelists will discuss how far we’ve come as a community and the progress we are still making every day.

With COVID-19 cases trending down, vaccines being distributed and restrictions loosening, County Board Chair Matt de Ferranti says his focus is starting to shift toward Arlington’s economic and social recovery.

“There is more work to do on the pandemic but recovery has already begun,” he said.

And Arlington County, by his assessment, is in a fairly strong place financially — in some ways, he said it is in a better place than when numerous federal agencies and military offices decamped from Pentagon City and Crystal City starting around 2005.

Arlington will receive $23 million this year and next year through the federal American Rescue Plan, some of which will be used to return funding for affordable housing and hunger prevention programs that had been on the chopping block from the 2022 budget. The new budget, as passed, boosts spending by 3.5% despite the economic turmoil caused by the pandemic.

In addition, Amazon’s presence is contributing to Arlington’s stability. De Ferranti said the e-commerce giant’s arrival is and will continue attracting talent and businesses of all sizes, strengthening the county’s commercial office base. And, for now, the county has been spared from making incentive payments to Amazon.

The county’s incentive package for Amazon stipulated that Arlington would share a cut of the revenue generated from an increase in hotel stays if Amazon met its hiring goals. Since the economic impact of the coronavirus also included dramatically fewer hotel stays, Arlington has not been on the hook for these payments.

If any of these things weren’t true, de Ferranti said he “would be more worried about the fiscal outlook in 2023, 2024 and 2025.”

This moment — when the county’s financial outlook is strong but there’s still significant need in parts of the community — is exactly when the government needs to step in, he said. Keeping people who are at risk of eviction in their homes, fighting hunger and providing grants and loans to small businesses will have big economic returns later on, the chair said.

The county has learned a number of financial lessons from the coronavirus, de Ferranti noted. Arlington will need to invest more in public health staffing and is considering a rainy-day fund for future public health emergencies. When the American Rescue Plan funding dries up, the county may need to increase its support, through grants and loans, for small businesses as well as its investments in hunger and eviction prevention.

While the county has been focused on the pandemic response, it has held back on certain equity-focused work. Some community engagement in land-use changes to address Missing Middle housing was pushed back due to the pandemic, as have investments in multimodal transit and workforce development.

“Arlington is committed to equity, but it has been hard,” de Ferranti said.

And while Amazon is economically propping up the county in some ways, Arlington Public Schools’ budget will not be feeling the returns as directly. The county will need to do more work with the School Board and administration to address APS’s systemic budget deficits, he said.

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Address: 3959 26th Street N.
Neighborhood: Donaldson Run
Listed: $1,025,000
Open: Sunday, May 9, 1-4 p.m.

Located on a quiet cul-de-sac, this newly renovated home is well sited on an 8,900-square-foot lot backing to trees. Add a second floor or expand from the back to take advantage of the beautiful, level lot.

A door from the driveway opens directly into the new kitchen, which features white cabinets, quartz countertops and stainless appliances. More storage is available in the adjoining pantry. The focal point of the living room is the wood-burning fireplace, while the dining room is separated from the kitchen by a versatile breakfast bar. Three bedrooms are on this level along with a newly renovated bath with a deep tub, large vanity and additional built-in storage. Gleaming wood floors, double pane windows, fresh paint and lighting give the home a polished look.

High ceilings and tall windows in the lower level make the rec room inviting for media, play, sports and games. With a fully renovated bath on this level, the rec room doubles as a private space for a guest or distance learner. A second room may be used as a home office, workshop or gym. Additional storage is in the large laundry and utility room, and the extra fridge offers you the needed room after a Target run. Coretec LFV flooring provides a durable surface, particularly as the basement opens directly to the new patio and yard with new landscaping.

Walk to Donaldson Run Rec Association’s pool and tennis courts along with Potomac Overlook Regional Park organic garden, picnic pavilion, summer programs for children and scouts, and nature trails with room to roam.

Listed by:
Betsy Twigg
McEnearney Associates
703-967-4391
[email protected]
www.betsytwigg.com

A new ropes course facility is set to open at Upton Hill Regional Park sometime in June, amid an expected spike in park visitor activity.

“It’s going to be the biggest and the best in the mid-Atlantic region,” said Paul Gilbert, the executive director of NOVA Parks, of the new ropes course. NOVA Parks runs Upton Hill, which is located at 6060 Wilson Blvd near Seven Corners.

Climb UPton will have 90 different elements on three different levels, including zip lines and a 50-foot drop. It will be open to those who are 49 inches or taller.

Construction on the course is largely complete but work, subject to changing weather, continues on an administrative building, Gilbert said. Once more work is complete, NOVA Parks will set a user fee and pick an opening date, which the executive director expects will be in mid- to late- June.

As for COVID-19 safety, Gilbert said social distancing is built into the course and equipment will be sanitized between uses.

“The outdoors is your biggest safety feature,” he said.

This new facility will open as NOVA Parks expects an increase in visitors to all its facilities this summer. Gilbert said he expects pools and waterparks — all of which will open Memorial Day — to drive the increase, as they were closed last summer.

“This summer, people are going to be interested in returning to normalcy,” said Gilbert, who is also George Mason University’s Executive-in-Residence for the College of Education and Human Development’s Recreation Management Program.

Adhering to Virginia guidelines for aquatic facilities, Upton Hill’s pool will operate at 75% capacity, and an annual pass will not guarantee admission if capacity has already been reached, according to the park’s Facebook page.

The organization is currently not selling new annual passes due to these restrictions.

“NOVA Parks will continue to evaluate this situation throughout the summer,” according to a Facebook post.

For its beach-themed Ocean Dunes Waterpark, Upton Hill is “hiring and preparing the waterpark for Memorial Day weekend opening,” another Facebook post said.

NOVA Parks is continuing to hire new summer staff for all its facilities to meet the surge in visitors, as capacity restrictions are set to perhaps end by June 15, Gilbert said.

But even with the restrictions, reopening the pools and waterparks could be a boon for the regional parks authority, which took an estimated $5 million hit in user fees in part because aquatic facilities were closed, according to its current budget.

Normally, 300,000 people visit one of NOVA Parks’ five waterparks each year, Gilbert said.

“Over the pandemic, people were already exploring the outdoors in new ways, because so many other things weren’t available,” Gilbert said. “We saw unprecedented use of hiking and biking trails. Now that people have discovered or rediscovered how fun the outdoors can be, I anticipate they will continue to gravitate to parks.”

Trail use increased by four to five times, he said. People also gravitated toward another activity that had been declining in popularity over the years: golf, which is up 30% from pre-pandemic times, he said.

NOVA Parks also leaned on other activities with social distancing potential, such as shooting, boating and swinging baseball bats.

“I think all of those trends are going to continue for some time,” Gilbert said. “People have been reintroduced to outdoor recreation.”

Photo courtesy NOVA Parks

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Looking for a home? There are plenty of houses and condos open for viewing this weekend.

Check out the Arlington Realty website for a full list of homes for sale and open houses in Arlington. Here are a few highlights:

3534 N. Somerset Street
6 BD/9 BA single-family home
Agent: Compass
Listed: $2,995,000
Open: Sunday, 2-4 p.m.

 

3188 Key Blvd
3 BD/3 BA, 1 half bath single-family home
Agent: Houwzer Realtors
Listed: $1,950,000
Open: Saturday, 1-4 p.m.

 

1700 Clarendon Blvd #157
2 BD/2 BA, 1 half bath condo
Agent: TTR Sothebys International Realty
Listed: $1,575,000
Open: Sunday, 2-4 p.m.

 

432 N. Nelson Street
4 BD/3 BA single-family home
Agent: Keller Williams Realty
Listed: $1,199,900
Open: Saturday and Sunday, 1-3 p.m.

 

3406 Military Road
5 BD/3 BA single-family home
Agent: Keller Williams Realty
Listed: $949,900
Open: Saturday and Sunday, 2-4 p.m.

 

4121 11th Place N.
3 BD/3 BA townhome
Agent: Cottage Street Realty
Listed: $879,000
Open: Saturday, 12-2 p.m.

 

3543 S. Utah Street
2 BD/2 BA townhome
Agent: Bluestone Realty
Listed: $620,000
Open: Sunday, 1-3 p.m.

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Have you found your quarantine oasis? Are you tired of paying down someone else’s mortgage? Please join us for a Rent vs. Buy Happy Hour on Wednesday, May 12 at 6 p.m. via zoom (link to be provided upon RSVP). A lot has happened in the local market since the beginning of the pandemic.

Sip on your drink of choice and learn from Northern Virginia and Washingtonian Magazine top producing agents on how you can get $1,500 towards your closing costs immediately! We will discuss the latest market updates, the home buying process and rent vs. buy cost savings. Please RSVP by clicking on the link. Call/text Manavi at 703-869-6698 with any questions!

Submit your own Community Post here for just $99.

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