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Zone Parking Becomes More Restrictive Near Clarendon

by ARLnow.com — March 28, 2011 at 9:44 am 8,076 351 Comments

(Updated at 9:50 a.m.) Some parking restrictions near Clarendon have gotten more restrictive.

The zone parking restriction on this residential stretch of North Highland Street, two blocks from Wilson Boulevard, used to end at 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. Now it ends at 1:00 a.m. seven days a week.

County spokeswoman Shannon Whalen McDaniel says the new signs went up on Monday, March 18.

  • Aaron

    I’m pretty sure it also goes 7-days a week now, as compared to M-F/Sat. Either way, parking is now next to impossible in the area as this is where I used to park. As such, Clarendon can kiss my money goodbye,

    No more quick trips for a meal or to grab something quick. This will only hurt the businesses in this thriving area and that’s too bad. For the residents, if you didn’t want people parking near your house, don’t live right off a commercial strip.

    • Good point, it actually only used to apply on weekdays. I’ll add that to the article.

      • charlie

        wouldn’t it be cheaper to drop the Mon-Sun and save ink?
        Permit Parking 8 Am to 1 AM.

        • Hikin’ the Pike

          +1
          Or just say 24/7..what’s the difference?

          • CW

            The county is actually amending the signs. The new text reads: “OUTSIDERS NOT WELCOME. EVER. SIGNED, LYON VILLAGE ARISTOCRACY”

          • charlie

            i heard that the sign was going to include a list of acceptable cars that could be parked, for no more than 30 minutes. Is that possible?

          • CW

            Yeah, that’s been one of the sticking points. They’re trying to determine the model year cutoff for Volvo wagons. There’s fear that some of the older models could be owned by undesirables.

          • tam

            I don’t get the vitriol. When I was young and broke…I worked hard to acquire what I didnt’ have. I didn’t trash and moan about residents..I busted my ass to get there. Very few ppl in LV own the cars you speak of…a hell of a lot more Hondas and Toyotas around here.

            Get to work.

          • CW

            These posts were just jokes. The vitriol is below.

          • syzygy

            “tam”:
            if the potential opportunity to live in Lyon Village is what motivated you to work hard, I feel truly sorry for you.

          • Lyon Village

            Lyon Parkers just want what Lyon Villagers have had for years.

    • Anon

      “For the residents, if you didn’t want people parking near your house, don’t live right off a commercial strip.”

      To be fair, I’m sure many of those people moved there before the strip became so big and some don’t have driveways bc parking wasn’t always an issue.

      • carebear

        For those driving in from the outer burbs…why dont’ you buy a place where you can walk..instead of driving home drunk and putting lives at risk?

        • LyonSteve

          To those of you who live here and walk around drunk, why don’t you drink at home so you don’t possibly walk into my car while I’m sober and you’re drunk in public?

    • FrenchyB

      Yes, because $3 to park at the former DHS building is such a burden.

    • borf

      They should all move away so you can park.

    • KalashniKEV

      The businesses in Clarendon will enjoy more patrons than they can handle, thanks to all the new condos that are going up. Admit it, you would be happier anyway just staying in your local area in South Arlington. Everyone here is always complaining about yuppies, and upscale, and craft beers. There are businesses that are marketed toward that crowd, just not in the ‘don.

    • AllenB

      It’s probably presumptuous of me to speak for Clarendon, but I don’t think they’ll lose much sleep over losing someone’s business who is too cheap to pay $3 to park in a garage. AMF, Aaron.

    • Daniel

      “For quick trips,” park in the parking garage…it’s $2 for less than a hour. That’s what I do…

      • DD

        Makes sense for an alternative. OR don’t shop in/around the area; you all can have my spot from now on. (I made several trips each week)……..no more.

    • southie

      Jay’s Saloon has a parking lot!

      • Raul Mendoza Formoza

        shhh… 🙂

    • Maria

      Yes, but they live in a *residential* area. Just because it’s a couple blocks from a commercial area doesn’t make it a parking lot for the businesses there. There is parking specifically for the businesses in Clarendon, and that is where people should be parking if they are going to those places. Why do you feel so entitled to park in someone else’s neighborhood when you’re going someplace else?

      • Too Easy

        Because a street is PUBLIC , I pay for it too. What makes you think its ok to use the sidewalk or bike trail when it’s not in your neighborhood?

        • Maria

          I didn’t ask why he felt it was “okay” to park there; I asked why he felt “entitled” to park there. I realize it may not seem like it, but those are two different things.

          • Maria

            And, for the record, while I appreciate them for my own parking situation, I don’t even necessarily agree with the restrictions. I’m just wondering why people a) jump to these incredibly negative reactions and conclusions and b) feel such a sense of entitlement to do whatever they want. I realize the streets are public, and that’s a generally valid argument, but unless everyone here is arguing that there should be zero regulation on anything public that exists in the world, it isn’t a very *strong* argument.

        • mehoo

          So, Too Easy, do you oppose all parking restrictions in commercial areas too? No meters, no time limits, no loading zones, etc?

    • parking woes

      the residents were there before all those big new buildings and shops and restaurants went in. your comment shows little respect and much ignorance for all the problems being forced on those residents near wilson blvd, clarendon blvd and soon to be columbia pike.

  • So far we haven’t heard which streets have gotten the new signs, other than North Highland. Where have you seen the signs?

    • charlie

      Filmore Street behind Faccia Luna has been 24/7 for a long time.
      on the back of the signs is a sticker that indicates when it was installed.

    • jason

      I have seen N Franklin between Filmore and Edgewood have the new signs.

      • Aaron

        Yep, N. Franklin does. It now pretty much encompasses all the old signs, and most roads many blocks north of Wilson or Clarendon (whichever is the west route there).

        Again, terrible for business. I know I won’t be eating there or visiting the local shops. Poor form Arlington, poor form indeed. I hope the businesses rebel when their business falls.

        • South Arlington

          They should rebel against the terrible Lyon Village complainers, they are the real ones to blame.

          • Lyon Village

            Now, now, don’t forget Barb and Mary are Villagers on the Board and Barb will be wanting your vote for state Senate.

          • Lyon Village

            Oh, yes, and Mary wants you to re-elect her to the Board

    • G

      They’ve changed the signs on both Herndon and Hudson on the block north of 13th street.

    • sue

      So the Moderator of this website lives on Columbia Pike…is it any wonder that attacking Lyon Village is condoned? What is this a w*tch hunt in LV? “Go through the neighborhood and tell me exactly where you see zone parking sign changes’ Give me a break!

      • Maria

        How is that a witch hunt? He’s requesting information. Also, he doesn’t control what people say or don’t say on here, so how does he “condone” any of this?

  • HP2000

    Why not just make it 24 hours at this point?

    • charlie

      agreed. i pretty much ignore parking regulations after 10 pm. police don’t ticket and parking enforcement is off their shift. park away.

      • Lucy

        Police do ticket if they recieve a complaint about a specific vehicle at a specific address. Yes PSA’s do work at night during the week.

  • jason

    Less reasons to go to Clarendon, less business the area. good job, Arlington.

    • borf

      Fewer (not “less”) reasons to DRIVE to Clarendon. Plenty of people still go there. And there’s still parking in garages, and it’s not that expensive either. The world doesn’t revolve around your car.

      • Rebecca

        +1 Borf. Seriously, this only takes away a few spots. The garages are big enough to handle people. Are you that pressed to pay $5 for parking?

      • Ray

        Good point. Many of the people going to the nightlife spots take Metro or taxis. We Arlingtonians who drive there, myself included, will just have to get off our duffs and walk or take the lovely Metro or ART buses.

      • steve

        So will there be some sort of fund to subsidize parking costs for the “poor”??? Not everyone in the area who goes to Clarendon is a Volve driving hipster that can afford to pay for the parking. That might be the straw that breaks the camel’s back for them.

        • KalashniKEV

          $5??? That’s less than a drink costs. If anyone is really that poor, they shouldn’t be in the corridor anyway.

          • steve

            So would you have some kind of rule that would prevent any section 8 tenants from utilizing these places since obviously since they have subsidized rent, they shouldn’t be frequenting these expensive clarendon places?

            Maybe people with bad credit, lot sof debt, etc should be barred for their own good as well?

            You do realize there are people not as well off as you, and yes, $5 would make a difference in their decision.

          • borf

            The poor should save money by not buying all that tobacco, plus they’d have lower health insurance premiums.

          • KalashniKEV

            No one needs to be “banned” from anything… are you just clueless in life? If $5 to park your car is going to sting, or be some kind of dealbreaker, then why would you be in an upscale area dining on fancy pizza and sipping Belgian abbey style beer? Why would you WANT to be there? Am I banned from playing polo because there’s no place to keep a horse nearby? Am I banned from private space travel because I can’t afford it? Maybe your failure to understand the nature of how markets work is related to your lack of $5 to to drive your car into Clarendon?

          • tam

            +100

          • Maria

            For once, I agree with you.

          • jjbug

            I enjoy your challenges to our thinking, I’m learning from you at 73.
            Marjie

          • Too Easy

            So now the county made it easier to build parking garages to make room for the cars that used to park on the street? The deal breaker would be full garages and the following rate hike and space reductions. It aint Ballston but sure enough could return to the war zone it was before, a Bookstore as an anchor for clarendon commons and another grocery store? Once the teabag army puts a squeeze on the Fed there is sure to be some painted windows fo sure.

        • CW

          Just a side note – people keep misusing “hipster”. Hipsters don’t drive Volvos, don’t buy new condos, and don’t park in Clarendon. Hipsters wear flannel, have facial hair, ride fixed-gear bicycles everywhere, and, although they do have a large supply of money from their parents, who paid for their high-priced liberal arts educations in unemployable fields, they try as hard as possible to look broke. I believe that you’re just thinking of garden-variety yuppies.

          • borf

            I’m thinking maybe in Arlington, hipsters and yuppies have converged into one. Our yuppies are that hip, and vice versa.

          • Clarendude

            Yipsters ! What did people talk about before we had cars and car storage ?

          • Tre

            +1 for yipsters

          • outoftowner

            Real Hipsters wouldnt be caught dead in Arlington, let alone the Clarenedon scene. Rarely do they leave the District

          • South Arlington

            To add to that, Clarendon doesn’t really attract Hipsters. Besides Galaxy Hut that is. Clarendon attracts 20 somethings that live in Reston and Herndon that are out for their “big night in the city”. It also attracts meatheads and Jersey Shore type fist pumpers. Moreso than the brown flip flops, it attracts the striped shirt, square toed shoes and gelled hair up-down types. Hipsters don’t usually leave their enclave in Columbia Heights and U Street.

          • KalashniKEV

            There are no hipsters in Galaxy Hut. AND this board is continuing to fail at identifying their nests, which leads me to believe they have no idea what a “hipster” is, and have never been to Williamsburg.

            H-Street.

          • South Arlington

            I realized I left off the true den of Hipsters after I hit submit: H Street NE. More fixed gear bikes and ironic mustaches per capita than anywhere in the region. They’ve slowly migrated there since Columbia Heights and U Street started gentrifying and weekly murders slowed down to once-every-three-months murders.

            I disagree on Galaxy Hut, it’s as Hipster as you can find in the area (maybe Iota a bit also), although nowhere near H Street NE.

          • CW

            Williamsburg hipsters are something that just can’t be recreated elsewhere, but I’d say H St NE is about the closest we get around here.

          • JamesE

            True Williamsburg hipsters right here (I know you are referring to NYC)

          • KalashniKEV

            JamesE- I would rather hang out with those Williamsburg hipsters. 🙂

          • AllenB

            You obviously don’t frequent Clarendon much at all or just aren’t very observant. Clarendon attracts plenty of types, from the types you mention to 30 and 40 somethings out for a good dinner, to older types that have lived here for years. It’s a big mix of everyone with an emphasis on the 20 something to 40 crowd.

          • South Arlington

            Yes, but I think it’s fair to say the demographic going to Clarendon Ballroom, Clarendon Grill, Mr. Day’s, Whitlows, Spider Kellys and Liberty Tavern between the hours of about 9 PM – 2 AM on Friday and Saturday nights fall squarely within the profile I gave. Obviously people out dining at the restaurants fall into a much wider demo, but I’m speaking mainly of the bar traffic during prime bar hours.

        • Rebecca

          Steve, if you don’t have an extra $5 for parking, then you don’t have an extra $1 to pay for anything in Clarendon. What’s the cheapest place there… Galaxy Hut? If you’re so destitute where you can afford to own a car AND drive it with today’s gas prices but can’t afford to park in the garage, then you are serious budget problems. Furthermore, I’ve driven to Clarendon numerous times and never find street parking so I always park in a garage. These are just a few parking spots being lost. It’s not like they’re shutting the whole town down. My god.

          • R.Griffon

            Exactly. The notion that someone can’t pay a couple bucks for metered or garage parking on their way to Clarendon TO SPEND MONEY is a joke. There are plenty on this board who will bash Clarendon at every opportunity due to it’s popularity and success.

            Please don’t feed the trolls.

        • Josh S

          A joke, right?
          Parking downtown costs $12+ a day. It’s more than I choose to afford. Does that mean someone should be paying me money?
          Filet mignon is $14 a pound. I can’t afford it except on special occasions. Should I be applying to the expensive meat fund?

      • jay

        when I lived in Clarendon…back before there was much to do. I would CAB or Metro into the District every weekend night. NYC I never drove anywhere…the more urban a place gets the less people drive.

    • AllenB

      Yeah, because the area is hurting for business so much that the loss of a few parking spots is going to send businesses into a downward spiral. Nice try, Jason.

  • JohnB

    It has changed on Irving and Jackson behind Liberty Tavern, but that happened more than a few months ago when the free garage started to charge. People who live in the area started to complain after they couldn’t park in front of their houses when they got home from work.

    • Not a fan

      I doubt very much that the people who live on these streets routinely work until 1:00 a.m. But it’s interesting to note that these new restrictions effectively permit residents who can afford to live in single family houses (whose property values reflect the benefit of living in an economically viable area) to shift the noisy, drunken masses to the parking garages where the residents who can only afford apartments and condos live. So single-family homeowners now receive all of the benefit without any of the inconvenience.

      • CW

        +1000. Our garage has a divide between the public and residential spaces, but it’s not nearly enough of a physical barrier to make me comfortable. And no, I’m not casting the “drunken masses” as a boogeyman, but everyone knew that guy in college who liked to knock off side view mirrors after he’d had a few, and the odds of there being some sort of shenanigans or vandalism is pretty high.

      • ForeSight

        And excellent point, Not a fan. You can have 300+ residents on a single block (in apartments or condos), but they can’t petition for resident-zoned parking on their adjacent street(s) — not the way single-family-home owners can. That parking will remain metered (or unzoned) — open to any and all 24/7. Oh, well, at least you have the noise of your heavy-footed upstairs neighbor to drown out the noise of the rowdy bar-goer returning to his car, parked outside your window.

  • steve

    I hope this hurts business there.

    • Just sayin’

      Why?

    • R.Griffon

      It won’t. Anyone who doesn’t have $2 for parking isn’t helping business in the first place.

  • WilliAM

    Lots of parking on Columbia Pike. And since Dr. Dremos is (hopefully) coming , why not kiss ClarenDONE to the curb. Come on down to the Pike for some CinemaDraft, Twisted Vines, and Lost Dog.

    • Josh S

      Well, technically, hardly any parking ON Columbia Pike. Which I think is a mistake and I hope that whatever happens at Col Pike and Glebe will include some street parking.

      • South Arlington

        True, but at least the garage under the Halstead is free after 6 PM everyday along with a few free surface lots.

    • imissTX

      I think perhaps you meant “kick it to the curb”, or “kiss it goodbye”…

  • CW

    Umm, not to be mean but isn’t there some journalism begging to be done here?

    The story really is “some new signs showed up; must mean that the rules changed”? And people chiming in reporting where other signs went up? How about a little digging – I’m no expert on the way policies such as this are developed but shouldn’t such changes have arisen out of a meeting of some board somewhere or something? That is; shouldn’t there be a bit more back story? Not poking fun – just very curious since this is not just an administrative change but rather a very clear implementation of a policy shift (“We do not want ‘outsiders’ parking on our streets”).

    • When I get a response from the county to my question from Friday, I will post it. In the meantime, there’s nothing wrong with asking readers what they’ve observed. It’s already producing some interesting responses.

      • CW

        Nope, agreed, and thanks. Just wanted to make sure this wasn’t the whole story, since like I said, it’s not just new signs – it’s a policy shift.

        I don’t know what level of approval this sort of decision requires, but I guess what I’m more surprised about is that there wasn’t any sort of debate beforehand. If this really just happened overnight after a closed-door decision it seems a bit shady.

        • charlie

          ummm because this is the block that Mary Hynes lives in…

          • CW

            Ok, it all makes sense now.

        • tam

          It wasn’t a policy shift. The last time the parking zones were implemented it was in response to people parking for free in the neighborhood to use the Metro. It took up all of the spaces in the surrounding blocks. Hence- the sign changes.

          The same rules exist now–as they did back then. Once the strip started changing more people began flooding the area at all hours of the day and night. The streets in the blocks close to the ammenities became overcrowded—so much so that there were street spaces for the residents that ACTUALLY LIVE ON THE STREET. This past year was the breaking point and many streets petitioned for new hours.

      • Lyon Village

        Don’t knock Mary OR Barb. They represent the interests of Lyon Village extremely well. Like last year when the the Board gave the Village $675,000 to resurface two tennis courts and install “dark sky” lighting – money better spent in the Village than fixing up some old facility like Lubber Run Amphitheater. Or like last year when they moved DHS to Sequoia Plaza – money certainly well spent to remove a certain client element from Clarendon and the Village even though some of those clients now don’t have adequate bus transportaion to reach the new facilities. Yes, these ladies are doing a fine job for Villagers.

        • El Fat Kid

          Hynes does a good job… Favola is a nut and is neither liked or respected by a vast majority of Lyon Village residents.

          • Just sayin’

            That’s soon to be Sen. Favola to you.

          • G. Clifford Prout

            From what I see on TV I wouldn’t want to be alone in a room with her.

        • nova4ever

          Please don’t forget to mention the stark difference between snow service and debrish service that Lyon Village enjoys. I live on the other side of Kirkwood, and whereas the streets in Lyon Village during the snow fall earlier this year were all clear, including the cul-de-sacs – but the streets in front of Science Focus were at the same time still difficult and dangerous to drive on. Likewise, after the heavy wet snowstorm that came through this year, I saw county trucks picking up the debris of felled branches within days and on the other side of Kirkwood I finally gave up waiting after weeks, cut up all the felled branches into bags for removal. My neighbor had to wait several more weeks for the county to pick his up. Lyon Village is receivng preferential treatment of county crew services – do they have their own association for this or is it county crews?

          • tam

            Georgetown,Cleveland Park, NW vs Southwest.

            This type of thing happens everywhere.

  • steve

    Are these parking restrictions actually legal? I mean, how can an arlington resident, who pays for that tax sticker, be denied the ability to park on any taxpayer funded road?

    • Duh

      If you have a house on that road you actually do pay for the privilege to park there.

      • Too Easy

        Buzz , wrong . They only pay for half 1/2 less than all . The rest of the taxpayers subsidize the homeowners self interests.

    • amsa

      Yes, they are legal. Take a look at questions and answers for numbers 2 and 14, then also read number 19.

      http://www.arlingtonva.us/Departments/EnvironmentalServices/dot/traffic/parking/EnvironmentalServicesRppfaq.aspx

    • tam

      Yes. There is zone parking all over Arlington. I lived in a different zone prior to living in Zone 6/Clarendon. I could not park over here in violation of the hours on the sign.

      Everybody has a zone stick in N.Arlington. I can’t park over on your residential street certain hours with my Zone 6 either. The more crowded an area, the more restrictive the zone hours so that residents have access to their homes.

      Perfectly legal and how its been for a long, long time.

      I lived in Georgetown prior and it was even more restrictive. Almost had to donate a kidney to get a guest pass for a visitor.

      • sarah

        Yes! These ppl are so f*ing stupid!

  • Arlwhenever

    Can’t park in that area anymore? Well, then this year was the last time I take my family to the Mardi Gras parade. The County is systematically destroying most everything I liked about living here. In the end the only options available will be to imbibe and engorge oneself at over-priced eateries. I wonder if people will ever wise up and realize where the anit-car, density at any cost obsession is headed.

    • CW

      Are you implying that Arlington is taking a one-way streetcar ride to yuppieville? Next stop, brown flip-flop street?

    • AllenB

      What drama! You could just pay $3 to park in a garage, take metro if you can, take an ART bus if you can, or park several blocks away and hoof it.

      • CW

        Well, to be fair, I think he’s upset that the latter of those options is becoming less feasible. I’m not sure how far the signs extend, but there’s only a finite distance between Wilson and Lee.

        • AllenB

          Well, parking is much less restrictive in Courthouse and is only a 10 minute walk, or less to Clarendon. And parking in the Courthouse Plaza garage is free nights and weekends as well.

          • CW

            Hey, I’m with you man. If I’m going to drive my car to Clarendon, then I’m going to pay to park in one of the many relatively-cheap garages. Compared to the cost of doing just about anything in Clarendon, $3-5 is a drop in the bucket.

      • nova22201

        With all the vehicle break-ins in 22201, you’d think people would want to park in a garage, versus the neighborhoods. I know the garages are are not monitored, but it does take balls to break a window in a parking garage versus a vacant street. Just read the crime reports.

      • Arlwhenever

        Drama?

        Yes, me and the County’s Office of Economic Development which says that the way things are done in ArlCo these days the only things we are going to have left are Banks, Bistros and Boutiques. See,

        http://www.arlingtonvirginiausa.com/docs/EDC_Retail_final_Dec2009.pdf

        To quote the report, “Regional retail destinations, including Tysons Corner, Old Town Alexandria and Georgetown are siphoning sales within a very mobile and competitive market.” Ordinary people leading ordinarily lives are being poorly served by the anti-car, density at any cost obsession.

        From the south we can’t access the usual parking garages when streets are closed for the parade. As for taking the bus, sure, get my 10 year old, 8 year old and 5 year old on a bus, transfer to another bus, on a school night and then reverse the same coming home, having spent 15 bucks needlessly on transportation, getting home by 10:30 pm if we are lucky. That is crazy, not dramatic.

        All the planning around here is being done by people who don’t have real lives.

        • Slums

          Because M Street and Wisconsin in Georgetown are SO car friendly with their 2 parking garages and nightmarish traffic and parking.

        • AllenB

          Yes, Arlwhenever, it is dramatic to bitch and moan about getting to a parade a year from now. Especially when said parade starts just a few blocks from a garage that is free on nights and weekends.

          The report also says that CONVENIENT parking is critical to successful retail, not FREE parking. There is plenty of parking available within the core of Clarendon if you’re willing to shell out $3-5. If that’s too much of a barrier for you, my guess is you weren’t doing much shopping in Clarendon anyway.

          To quote the report: “While there is parking in Arlington’s commercial areas, there is also a mistaken perception that it is limited, difficult to find and expensive.”

          Yes, drama I said.

          • Josh S

            +1

          • Too Easy

            Where is the free garage?

          • AllenB

            The garage underneath Courthouse Plaza, where the county govt building and the movie theaters are is free every night after 5pm and all day on weekends.

        • mehoo

          Building low-density, traffic-choked development is anti-car too. Try driving in it. And it’s also anti-people.

        • R.Griffon

          > From the south we can’t access the usual parking garages when streets are closed for the parade.

          Untrue. Both the courthouse plaza garage and the Market Commons garages are easily accessible from all points south (and north, east, and west, for that matter). And someone else who knows can chime in, but I think they only closed Fillmore at the intersection with Wilson, meaning you could still access the one next to Whitlow’s, just feet from the parade. Plus the new developments will add even more garages. That’s a really lame argument.

          I can’t believe so many people are fired up about the loss of a handful of free parking spaces. Seriously, if you can’t spend a couple bucks to park, then the local economy probably doesn’t need you.

    • Hokie

      This isn’t a move to keep you out of your car. It is a move to give the people who live there the ability to park in front of their homes. You can complain about anti-car once they install toll booths and colletion agents on city streets and install congestion taxes for people that drive.

      If you’re too cheap to pay for parking, then you probably shouldn’t be going out in Clarendon/Court House area anyhow. It’s just the way it is.

      • tam

        Yes. My 70 year old parents can never find a spot in front of our house when they come visit their grandssons. There is usually some inconsiderate douchebag that can’t even be bother to pull the f**CK up so that at least one more car can fit behind them.

        • Erin

          Hopefully they have a sticker for their car, or they won’t be able to park there either when they come for a visit, unfortunately.

          • tam

            No. We used to be able to pull our car out of the driveway into the street in front of the house. Now there are always 2 cars there around the clock outside the zone so we haven’t been able to do that.

            Once the zone is changed that won’t be problem and they continue to park in our driveway again.

        • Maria

          I. HATE. THAT. It amazes me how dense people are about parking at the end of curbs. It’s not rocket science, everyone.

    • steve

      If I didn’t have such a good deal in my buidling, I would have left Arlington a couple years ago. Though a longer commute would suck. The traffic in this entire area is horrible. I live in Arlington for the convience to my job in DC. Otherwise, I absolutely hate the place.

      The worst thing is them tearing down old historic buildings to put in more stupid condos, to bring in more hipsters to the area. It’s a shame that shopping center that Royal Lee in was not protected. You don’t see many old buildings like that abymore, and they tore it down just recently after all the leases ran out 3 years ago, and only now are building another stupid condo.

      • Rebecca

        Once again, the word “hipster” is misused. Real hipsters live in H street. Steve, you seem to really hate Arlington but continue to add to its revenue. Be a real martyr and move to SW and pay .5 for a plastic bag. Now that’s a horrible thing. I mean, what about those poor people who can’t afford that .5 tax on plastic bags?! How will they afford groceries?!

        • Josh S

          Just a tip: “.5” in the context of money doesn’t really mean anything. The closest possible interpretation would be fifty cents. You might have been meaning to say “.05”, which is five cents, which is what the actual bag tax is.

      • KalashniKEV

        The Arlington hatred and love of Slum-living comes out!

      • Arlwhenever

        +++ to the point that I may take up smoking again.

      • RosRes

        Steve – Just an observation. I’ve lived in Rosslyn since 1998. I would have to think that the population along the R-B corridor has more than doubled since then. Yet, I have not noticed an aprreciable difference in traffic. And since my Mom lives in Clarendon, I drive between Rosslyn and Clarendon all the time. And for the record I park in a garage and pay $3.

      • R.Griffon

        Indeed. How DARE they build condos and apartments just like the one you live in to allow more people to live closer to work just like you do? SHAAAAME!

    • Just sayin’

      In the 20 years, I’ve lived here it’s meant more options, not less, and a better quality of life for me and my family.

    • CarsSuck

      You won’t be missed, cheapskate. Have fun at the Mardi Gras celebration in Potomac Mills.

      • Kathy

        As an Arlingtonian who loves living here, you made me laugh out loud~

  • JamesE

    N Stuart St in Ballston needs a giant electronic sign that says “Do not turn down this street there is no more parking, do not do a 15 point u-turn in front of the condo parking garage you moron” Also remote controlled spiked strips would help for current residents of said building. I may be a little bitter and biased towards this issue.

    • R.Griffon

      At least they finally put in a 4-way stop at the bottom. Although it was nice to cruise through it, I can’t count the number of times I almost crashed into someone who expected me to stop despite not having a stop sign.

      • JamesE

        I am on the other side of the opposing ends where there is some street parking and the lot for the strip with 7-11, first down, etc. People camp out and sometimes block the entrance to our garage, one day I am going to snap. Also they don’t even bother to turn around at the end but do it right in front of the garage exit.

  • Rosslyn

    It continues to amaze me how Arlington County seeks to jump into every aspect of life and pick winners and losers for everything. Would Lyon Village and Clarendon really cease to function if we just let people park on the streets and walk a few blocks to Clarendon? Those houses are in an urban area. We should not have the County sanctioning an effectively 24-hour-a-day ban on using public streets.

    • steve

      Either those homeowners should have to pay more taxes for exclusive use of public streets, or everyone else gets a discount. It’s wrong to abuse public streets like that. They belong to EVERYONE in arlington, not those homeowners. You buy the property, not the street. That street is just as much mine as it is theirs.

      • steve’s mind

        wah-wah…mine, mine, mine.

        My yellow Xterra belongs in front of your house while i go get wasted then drive home at 1am when questionably sober.

        Oh you’ve lived here for twenty years? F— you i went to an Boston College and my dad owns the fifth largest commercial real estate business in Connecticut.

        Communities? F— that, bro.

      • jason

        Not to mention all the houses there has driveways large enough to park an army.

        • Tabby

          Interesting sentence…

      • Novanglus

        They DO pay more in taxes. The average taxes on a house in Lyon Village is $8000/year. Pay your $2-$5 bucks at one the five garages and stop whining.

        • Too Easy

          whaa whaa whaa , between the three properties I have in Arlington I have double that bill , and NONE have permit parking. Free the street and pay your WHOLE bill freeloaders.

          • Ann of Tan Gables

            Three properties — shouldn’t that mean you have three times the tax bill? Or are your taxes for non-LV properties perhaps lower?

          • Too Easy

            What kind of Moron would ask a question like that. ” Three times the tax bill? ” . Here is a hint , in Arlington you get a single tax bill for each property, they don’t let you take one bill a pay it three times and call it even.

          • Too Easy

            Proly the same kind of Jerk who would push for giving some rich locals a freebie. What is the monthly rate for parking in Clarendon , hint alot more than $30 a year.

          • Ann of Tan Gables

            So did you mean that each of your three properties has a tax bill that is $16,000? Also, the term “bill” can refer either to a specific piece of paper or to the total charges for something.
            If you are saying that you own three properties in Arlington that are comparable to typical Lyon Village houses, including lot size, and they are assessed for twice what a typical LV house is (because the assessment determines taxes, right?), I am surprised, to put it mildly.

    • Josh S

      Huh? Why does it “amaze” you? You’re just now realizing that decisions have consequences? OF COURSE the county is picking “winners and losers.” That’s their JOB. As with every decision, they weigh the competing interests of the county residents / visitors / etc. In this case, they made a reasonable decision that the needs of the local property owners to be free from the late night noise and disruption of bar/restaurant goers outweighed the needs of those bar/restaurant goers and shoppers, especially considering that those patrons have many other options, including the local garages, street parking on Clarendon and Wilson, not driving, etc.
      This discussion is dominated by complainers. Had the decision gone the other way, it would also be dominated by complainers – just a different set. (For the most part – some people do like to complain, regardless….)

      • Thes

        Some people even have a different set of sock puppets they use here to complain on respective sides of a given issue.

        • Raul Mendoza Formoza

          which used to be annoying, until i tried it…

          • El Fat Kid

            I knew it!

    • mehoo

      I suppose you want to get rid of all zoning, huh? Wouldn’t want to pick winners and losers after all.

      • Rosslyn

        We should just assign names to the “no parking” signs. “No parking” unless you are Steve who knows the County Board.

        I’m not a BC grad (but thanks for the effort to raise the level of the debate), and not a new resident. I pay as much in taxes to Arlington County as (if not more than) the folks in Lyon Village. The comment from the resident in Lyon Village who is upset that she has to walk “one block” to find parking makes the point perfectly. These are public streets and we should not be giving one group of taxpayers an extreme veto power over all uses of the streets but their own, 24-hours-per-day.

        • Thes

          In many cases in Arlington, the portion of the street in front of someone’s house IS actually owned by the homeowner. The government just has an easement to build and use the street there.

          • charlie

            i would love to know of examples of this in front of a single family houses?

        • Just sayin’

          I’m not sure being a BC grad “raises” the level of the debate. 😉

        • Maria

          I understand your point, but I would venture a guess that a pretty good portion of people parking on those streets on weeknights/weekends aren’t Arlington residents.

  • nova22201

    Although I walk to Clarendon – but I’m not in Lyon Village – it’s much better to park on a county street and get a ticket than to park on commercial property and get towed.

    • BallstonDude

      +10000.

  • Normally I don’t weigh in with opinions on stories, but here’s a question:

    If there’s a fire in a home surrounded by zone parking, where am I supposed to park to cover the story?

    • Aaron

      Or if you are having a party at a friend’s house. Does Arlington issue temp. visitor permits, like DC does for it’s zones? I honestly have no idea. Or what if you have an emergency and must cover child-care, is it worth a $50 ticket.

        • Thes

          Um, so… yeah. The same website describes how zoned parking like this is put in place:

          “The current permit parking program is backed by an ordinance (18 KB PDF) which details the criteria for a block to be designated or zoned as permit parking only. These criteria are:
          (a) 60% of the households on a block must sign a petition requesting zoned parking.
          (b) at least 75% of the available parking on the block should be occupied
          (c) at least 25% of the available parking on the block should be occupied by out-of-area vehicles such as commuters, shoppers, students, etc.”

          So we can safely assume the hours were extended because 60% of the neighbors on that block asked to have the hours extended, and the County measured and found that the block was full of non-neighborhood cars (perhaps some even with -shudder- Maryland plates) at the specified times.

          Any block of single-family homes facing this situation can use the same procedure and get the same result. It’s a formula based on demonstrated need and desire of the residents.

          • Southeast Jerome

            Although this will be a slight pain for me, I think this is moving towards a better solution but I think 1:00am is a bit extreme. Maybe something closer to 8:00pm would ensure these ppl that live here will have a place to park when they get home from work (which is fair to them).

            Plenty of garage parking for the most part though I will say this is going to partially deter me from getting quick-service take out from this area. Cant really say its quick if you have to park 5 blocks away in a garage, pay for the garage etc. But very minimal business impact. Most places in this area wont be hurt.

          • Arlington, Northside

            They are also concerned with drunks on the lawn.

          • DT

            NIMFYs?

          • DoYourHomework

            There are 2 options for zoned parking. Until 5pm or until 1am. 8pm is not an option.

          • Maria

            I don’t think he meant is *is* an option, just that it *should* be. Also, from Arlington’s brochure on zone parking:

            “Residents of blocks new to the RPPP choose one or more of the following time periods: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm, 5:00 pm – 12:00 am, 12:00 am – 8:00 am, or a combination of the three times.
            Residents of each block choose the days for which the restricted hours are effective: every day, Monday–Friday only, or Saturdays/Sundays/Holidays.
            Arlington County may also allow two-hour parking during a restricted period without a permit or visitor pass.
            Some blocks have existing restricted times different from those listed above. They can be retained if residents don’t want them changed”

      • steve

        There are visitor’s passes. But the reality is, Arlington Doesn’t want people having cars. If they had the power to ban cars, they would have. That’s what happens when you live in a place controlled by control freak doo gooder liberals.

        • mehoo

          Arlington isn’t anti-car, it’s pro-human.

          • JamesE

            Arlington is only anti-car when I receive the property tax on it.

          • mehoo

            Yeah, they lose money if they get rid of cars. Thanks for pointing out that they’re not as hungry for our tax money as everyone likes to say too.

    • mehoo

      You need a bike!

    • NArl

      well you an d the fire department can park a few blocks away and walk, I guess that what the people in that area want.

    • CW

      The Lyon Villagers don’t want you covering any fires that might break out in their ivory towers, duh.

    • sarah

      We could give a rat’s ass if you can cover the story. We just need the fire dept to come put it out..and if these dbags werent’ blocking our fire hydrants with their cars…they could do just that.

      • South Arlington

        With a winning personality like sarah’s representing the neighborhood, it’s hard to see why the majority of Arlingtonians can’t stand the LV neighborhood.

        • mehoo

          She’s got a point though.

    • FireMarshalBill

      hey ARLnow, try parking in a fire lane, I got something for your a$$

      • No, thanks. We would just park in the zone parking area if need be, not anywhere that might impede emergency responders.

  • NArl

    AS a side not the Arlington NOW, the people that live in the area of Yorktown HIgh School did it first. They made the Zone 10 go to 1am but it is only monday – Friday.

    If you want zone parking in you neighborhood the neighborhood assoc. should pay for the upkeep of the road and sidewalks without tax money. Since you want to make it so no one can use you road.

    • RosRes

      +1

  • Ed

    This move is geared to give the people who live there the ability to park in front of their homes and Im one of them. I cant tell you how many times I have come home late from work and had to park more than a block from my home.

    There are plenty of garages that offer very resonable rates and are open late. If you dont want to park then take a cab. If you dont want to come and visit clarendon then go to Ballston or Rossyln where the street parking options are just as poor.
    I doubt these new parking restrictions will have any impact whatsoever on local business.

    • mr. Ed

      Park in your drive way or on a speed hump

    • charlie

      a whole block?

    • Southeast Jerome

      But what if someone has to park in a garage and walk a whole TWO blocks to their destination Ed?

      I understand you want to park close to your home and I think thats fair. But having the restriction until 1am is a bit extreme, especially having it be that way 7 days a week. If it was M-F until 8:00pm, you might be able to win me over, but until 1:00am 7 days a week thats just selfish of the neighborhood.

      • Hokie

        I actually think the 24hr thing would be appropriate. If you cut it off at 8pm, it doesn’t defeat the purpose of keeping people that are there for nightlife from parking on residential streets- at least on Friday and Saturday when most people that are going out for a night might not plan on getting some place until 9 or 10. PLUS- that would then mean that residents that might themselves want to go out for a night to dinner, visit friends that live away, would have to plan on being home by 8pm. When is the last time you planned a nice dinner with friends and were home by 8pm?

        I really think this entire thing is a mountain out of a mole hill. Residents should have their ability to use their residential street to park. Visitors whose intent is to visit a bar, restaurant, movie theater, etc should use the commercially available parking spaces that were built to support those businesses. When businesses open up- they never say “well there’s plenty of parking in the neighborhood”.

        • Southeast Jerome

          In that case – might as well change all the zone parking signs to 1am if thats your logic…..

    • NArl

      Where does it say that you have the right to park in front of your house when you but it. make a driveway and park on it ontherwise I don’t care.

  • arlgirl

    I am an Lyon Village resident. In just the last 12 months the parking situation on our street has become INSANE. Our parents can never find parking when they come visit..guests to kid’s bday parties have to walk from commercial parking sites, etc. THEN—add in the beer bottles, drunks screaming on our front lawn at 1AM, taking leaks on our bushes, and dumping nasty food containers out of their cars. We have police (thankful for that) arresting ppl on our front lawns at least every other weekend. Cars come 60mph+ looking for parking do dangerous 360 turns out front during the day and night..we had 2 toddlers on the block nearly get run over this week.

    If people were respectable the parking issues wouldn’t be a problem. I lived in a busy area in NW prior to moving here and we never had these issues outside our TH windows.

    I moved here primarily for the ‘urban’ and as a devoted ‘city liver’ I have much more tolerance for crowds, parking issues, etc…the ones here have been unique to say the least. The area we live in is not a commercial zone and several blocks away from the action. It is residential. I applaud the County for supporting that.

    • sarah

      Yes. Thankfully, Arl Police routinely patrol and slap the cuff on.

    • CW

      Arlgirl, I’m going to take a break from my somewhat unfair and unproductive ad hominem attacks on you and address this – what you’re saying I 100% sympathize with. Unfortunately, however, I think that this might be a case of throwing the baby out with the bathwater. From a policy standpoint and also just from a rhetorical debate standpoint these are two different behaviors. Lawlessness and dangerous behavior must be dealt with as they are. I don’t think that it’s fair to say that all people who would park on the street are lawless drunks who do bad things. We’re not allowed to make those kinds of assumptions and policy-makers aren’t either. They could just as easily people people such as the poster here who wanted to take his or her kids to the parade. So throwing up straw men and boogeymen unfortunately doesn’t address the issue here.

      • arlgirl

        The safety issues—the speed, the running of the stops signs, the lack of stop signs, the going the wrong way down a one-way street..are being addressed in other venues. We have met with the police and Arlington Co. to work with fixed for these issues. Almost every household has young children and it has become increasingly dangerous.

        The parking and associated noise/trash, etc problems are not isolated incidents. It is every single Thurs after 5pm-Sunday 4AM. Every single weekend. We have running commentary the next day between neighbors–some of it is rather amusing and I am not too old to appreciate the humor in a lot of it.

        It is not the family going to the parade which happens one night of the year that leaves by 9:30pm. It is also not the couples going out for brunch on Sunday mornings, etc. It is the trash, the noise, the speeds, etc. EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND.

        The residents should be able to park in front of their homes. This isn’t an area with garages and many homes don’t have driveways or if they do they house 1 car leaving it impossible for visiting family members to find parking.

        • CW

          I understand your obvious safety concerns, but making that extension to where outsiders parking in your neighborhood is considered to be the root cause of the problems is the same sort of logic that led us to have Prohibition.

        • CW

          Also your last statement is just begging to be attacked. My house doesn’t have a garage, my house doesn’t have a swimming pool full of chocolate syrup, my house doesn’t have unicorns and waterfalls…boo hoo hoo, everyone else should have to cater to me. Uh, if not having a garage was such a big deal, one would have thought that people would take that into account before buying their $1M-plus houses. But I guess status is more important.

          • arlgirl

            …which is why I don’t need to find parking on a Saturday night.

          • South Arlington

            Where did you go to finishing school?

            Seriously, between arlgirl, tam and sarah, the Lyon Villagers have chosen a terrible PR team on this thread. They have been nothing but crass, pompous and combative.

            My hope is that highly public policies that affect many like this one that overtly favor Lyon Village help create opposition to other inequitable policies like superior snow and debris cleanup (which tam pointed out is OK because it happens in other unfair and unequitable instances like Cleveland Park and Georgetown).

          • tam

            Our street didn’t get plowed—ever–during Snowmegadon. I called, complained, wrote several letters, etc. I did my work/research and made it my job to find out who in the County was responsible. This year during the snowfall our street was one of the first to be plowed–in a large part because we were on the radar after what happened the prior you. Those of you complaining…do just that: complain.

            If you worked with the county about these issues you’d have better success. They even had a hotline to specifically log in areas that needed plowing.

            I in no way, shape or form condone favortism to locations based on household wealth. I was merely making the point it is not unique to Arlington. Whether it really happens here or not is up for debate. In fact- I think Arlington is extremely progressive..unlike the District. Our schools all over the county are great schools. Kids from disadvantaged homes do get a first rate education–unlike what is happening across the Bridge.

          • South Arlington

            People from all over the county complained about streets not getting plowed. We complained throughout Snowmageddon when our street wasn’t plowed for 17 days. We complained that our street wasn’t plowed this winter also. The thing is, tons of people all over the county complained via the hotline and via email and magically, Lyon Village has all of their snow and debris cleaned up first.

          • LV_Admirerer

            I’ll bet those complainers from all over the county couldn’t hold a candle to the complaining that Lyon Village did. Lyon Village often gets what it wants because it is organized, persistent, tenacious and shameless. This is a generalization as I do know many in LV that are more or less regular folks. LV isn’t the richest neighborhood, nor do I think they have any unusual sway with the County Board, the activists there just never give up (like the Terminator). This influences staff (who are just people trying to get through the day after all) – the squeaky wheel on steroids hogs all the grease. I admire LV, not because I like what they do, just because they are so damn effective.

          • Too Easy

            They are a bunch of leaches sucking off the rest of th Arlington taxpayer funds to increase the home values without paying the whole cost. If they were honest they would fork out something reasonable like a few hundred dollars for the restrictions. Compare the penaly to what they pay , chicken feed not even close to covering the cost of enforcing the code. It makes the system rely on violations to break even.

          • SayAgain?

            What cost to enforce? The cops come out and–trust me–there will be several violators to ticket at $50 a ticket…The $1,000’s in extra revenue each year probably helps keep your taxes lower so you’ll have more to spend at the parking garage!

          • Too Easy

            Classic LV DB , sure ACPD has nothing better to do than keep people off your front lawn. What a crock what would keep my taxes lower is if all the crybabies looking for a zone permit would pay a fair amount.

          • Maria

            And where exactly do you live?

          • Too Easy

            OMG , you first , are you going to call me out to fight next.

          • Maria

            I live on Washington Blvd in Ballston. And no, I am not “calling you out to fight,” because unlike you, I don’t feel the need to antagonize everyone I talk to.

            I asked because I am curious how you would feel if you regularly couldn’t park within a block or two of your house or were having drunk people leaving garbage/being arrested on your lawn on weekends.

          • Too Easy

            When I can’t find parking I park a few blocks away, up to a half mile if I stayed out to late. It’s not a big deal it’s my own fault for not cabbing, riding a bike and for having more than one car. The drunks are the price you pay to have the bars and shops in walking distance.I don’t ask the rest of the taxpayers to give me free parking and closing off my street.

          • sue

            Whatever, slumlord.

          • SayAgain?

            It’s far Too Easy to be judgemental, especially when you are too narrow minded to recognize that MANY people do pay their fair share of taxes. Unless you are a billionaire, I HIGHLY doubt that your share even comes close to what most single family households contribute. So between the taxes, the extra fees and headaches associated with zoned parking, residents definitely pay their “fair share” and aren’t leaching off of the other taxpaying residents. Get over it already!

          • Too Easy

            So your a billionare or is it a single family household. Phfft pay a reasonable amout for the permit cheapos $300.00 per car is not going to break you. After all you have a 1M house right.

          • SayAgain?

            Actually, I’m both, which is why I have time to post on ArlNow all day! If you can’t say the same, maybe it’s time to get to work, so you can also afford to live in an “elist” suburb where the streets are paved with gold and for pennies, you get reserved parking at your door step! If you have time to keep b*tching about people who just want the street they live on to be safe maybe you need a new hobby. If you want to fight the social injustice in the world, join the Peace Corp or something! All you keep saying is that these people aren’t paying their fair share–cite some proof! How much is the average real estate tax bill people on those streets pay, what is the average personal property tax bill paid by those residents, add in the fees associated with permit parking–it’s not free or without it’s own set of headaches–these people PAY in dollars and inconvenience! So why shouldn’t you pay?

          • Let’s tone this down, please. No need to get personal.

          • ForeSight

            You forgot “condescending.” … And here’s another thought: If you live anywhere within a half-mile from a Metro station (anywhere in the DC area), just go ahead and expect that the neighborhood is not going to remain peaceful and parklike and serene for decades on end. You know/knew what you’re getting into: development.

          • ForeSight

            That last post was in regard to “South Arlington”‘s comment on the LV PR team, by the way.

          • Ann of Tan Gables

            That depends on a given locality’s planning. Arlington’s smart growth plan means having businesses along the main streets next to Metro stops and residential areas backing up to that. Urban village. Live where you work. All of that.

          • Ann of Tan Gables

            Sorry, that was supposed to appear in response to Foresight’s 6:27 post.

          • South Arlington

            They also knew they were getting hundreds of thousands of dollars of increased property values and equity in exchange for the proximity to all the new attractions that are bringing cars to the neighborhood.

          • CW

            +100

            If I were the moderator I would highlight your post in bold and then close comments. But then people would probably stop reading my website since impartiality would have gone out the window. 🙂

        • I think part of the problem is the entitlement people in the neighborhood have in thinking they should always, without fail, be able to park directly in front of their house. This isn’t the standard in NW DC. As an area densifies, parking just becomes more used up.

          I live in a 1930s townhouse in north arlington (near Lee/Glebe) without a driveway, and my street is narrow and PACKED with cars. Some nights I have to park a block or two away. I don’t have the expectation that I will be able to park within 10 yards of my house, so why should you?

          Also, one additional difference between most DC zoned parking and here: in DC, anyone can park for 2 hours. I wouldn’t have the problem with extending restrictions to 1am if others could use the streets for SOME time during that period.

          If I want to go to a park in Lyon Village and all 10 of the “visitor” spaces are used up, I can’t park anywhere during the day, even if I’m only there for 30 minutes.

          The problems of trash, noise, etc. are understandable, and I can sympathize. But disallowing ANYONE from EVER parking during reasonable hours (even for an hour or two) seems entitled, elitist, and unfair to me. It’s turning these roads into private streets.

          • CJ

            Most of us left NW so that we would be able to park in front of our house once we had children and were juggling strollers and herding toddlers. This was traditionally known as a ‘suburb’.

          • Really? You think Clarendon is *more* suburban than, say the blocks surrounding the Tenleytown Metro station? Or the Van Ness station? Or Friendship Heights?

  • Too Easy

    Good they should also have to pay higher real estate assessments for the protected status

  • Raul Mendoza Formoza

    There seems to be a mix of memory-loss, hypocritical attacks and flexible principles going on here. Oh right, that’s acceptable practice on the arlnow comment section when attacking someone who lives in a nicer house.

    A majority of the residents in Lyon Village & Lyon Park have been around before all you yuppies and newbies arrived with suv’s, 750k condos and $15 glasses of wine. If you can believe it, Clarendon used to be compared to columbia heights b/c of it’s funky mix of ethnic food, cheap cost of living, record stores, neighborhood bars and laid back atmosphere…. Both neighborhoods have changed significantly in the last 15-20 years, with local residents mostly accepting change for the additional amenities it brings.

    You can ignore the fact that is was in large part due to the pressure of these neighborhoods on the county that we have the best public school system in the area, if not the country. I know, their houses are a lot nicer and closer to the metro than my apartment and yours, but that doesn’t mean it should be us against them. So they’re sick of not being able to have friend’s over for dinner or a bbq because the street is filled w/ suvs and bmws of young yuppies heading to clarendon ballroom, harry’s or some yup-central watering hole… can you blame them?

    Economic development is great but we must protect the neighborhoods whether it’s along Wilson or Columbia Pike. I’m sorry you wanted to park your suv in front of someone’s house but there are several parking garages – and don’t say $3 is too much to spend when you’re paying $80 for dinner or on drinks or $1500 on new macbook. If you don’t like the rates or the # of spaces at the garages that’s a reasonable complaint w/ the county. Unfortunately, several of the people on here targeting lyon village are doing it out of jealously with no legitimate points other than ‘those bastards.’ lame.

    I am happy to see an increase in zoned parking in SA neighborhoods (which for some reason doesn’t get quite the attention or attacks) b/c it was getting annoying having a bunch of falls church/fairfax folks think they can use the clog up neighborhood streets with commuter parking while they jump on one of the 16 buses.

    • JamesE

      The people buying the expensive condos aren’t the ones driving around looking for parking. I also don’t own a SUV or drink overpriced wine.

    • Rebecca

      Actually, the 16 buses don’t go to Clarendon…

      • Raul Mendoza Formoza

        Ummm. read again maybe? I was talking about South Arlington and the 16 buses that run The Pike.

    • CW

      You’re really going to do that man? Really? You’re going to be the hypocrite who plays that card? The one where you lament the fact that “those damn yuppie kids” are bringing tens of millions of dollars into the area, without mentioning the hundreds of thousands of dollars in equity that those homeowners have each gained as a result? In fact, this comment has an extra level of idiocy because you defend the homeowners without even being one of them, judging from the “my apartment” comment. Many of those homeowners haven’t been around any longer than the “damned BMW-driving yuppie kids” or whatever you call them. Especially not the ones buying up historic houses and bulldozing them to throw up cheap wood-framed crackerbox monstrosities that extend the within 6″ of their property lines. These people are no different than the ones you lament. Anyone who has been in that neighborhood more than 10 years has probably seen their property value double, and yet they’re still going to bitch and whine about the poor influence of all these “outsiders”? You’re telling me that these people have been hurt so badly by the “outsiders” that it offsets the 500k or so they’ve gained in home value since the neighborhood started changing? Just stop.

      • Raul Mendoza Formoza

        1) the new houses are ridiculous and ugly. I’m sure LV residents dislike them as much as you do.

        2) You have a short memory… most of the equity was gained before parking became the issue that it is today. Parking around Clarendon was not nearly as bad five years ago, when house were probably worth 98% of what they’re worth today. I don’t see how increased crowds at clarendon grill, hard times or spider kelly’s adds any equity to a house.

        3) you launch charges of idiocy, while completely missing the point of the argument.

        Encourage growth… but not at the expense of neighborhoods. Whether it’s on Columbia Pike, Wilson, Lee Highway, whatever. “Smart growth” is meant to improve livability, not destroy it. If we need to build more parking garages, metro stops or bike rental stations – fine. We have more than enough money to do so.

        • arlgirl

          +100,000

          • CW

            You go arlgirl! Defend those homeowners who bitch and moan as their piles of cash grow bigger! You will get your sweetgreen soon, I promise!

          • RosRes

            I feel inclined to point out that while there are many lovely homes in Arlington, there are also a lot of ugly older homes that no one should miss… like the 70’s split levels, the cookie cutter brick boxes, etc. And that while some of the new homes are indeed ugly, many of them are actually archicturally much nicer than what they replaced and make a good effort to fit in with their surroundings. It’s like everything else, it should be judged on a cae by case basis. Not all older home are nice / worth saving and not all newer homes are ugly / monstrosities.

          • CW

            Very fair point. Lots of nasty split-levels and ramblers. I’m just not a huge fan of the cubic craftsman monstrosities that reach seemingly to within inches of the property lines in all directions.

          • RosRes

            CW – True. I had heard that the County was going to change lot zoning to decrease the percentage of a lot that could be built on in order to rein in the lot line to lot line enormo box houses. I’m not sure whether they are really working on this but they should.

          • Veeta

            I am thankful every day that my tiny 50s ranch was not bulldozed. That enabled me to become a homeowner. They don’t make small homes any more and I wanted a yard, not a condo.

      • Josh S

        What else would you frame a house with? Steel? Brick? Just curious.

        Also, what does your post have to do with parking restrictions?

        • CW

          1) I was referring to the poorly constructed nature more than the wood framing. Although many of the houses torn down were brick, and steel framing for residential use does exist.

          2) It has nothing to do with parking. It has to do with the hypocrisy of people bemoaning what their neighborhood has come while simultaneously making out like bandits, watching their neighborhood be transformed into one of the most desirable places to live anywhere, and enjoying the benefits and amenities being paid for by the tax dollars of the same “outsiders” that they claim to hate.

          • Raul Mendoza Formoza

            For some reason you’re set on the assumption that growth coincide with protecting communities… this is kind of absurd since the ability to create growth corridors while protecting local neighborhoods is what has made Arlington the desirable place that it is.

            Zoned parking is a minimalist strategy to separate neighborhoods from commercial zones. I get that you’d rather park in front of a house rather than in a garage, but when there are hundreds of other people with that same preference, it becomes a problem.

          • Raul Mendoza Formoza

            *can’t coincide

          • Raul Mendoza Formoza

            and again… The equity and real estate values were there 5 years ago, before parking became the issue that it is today.

          • Too Easy

            Baloney , there was free parking at the DHS center not no more. Any place with restricted parking should have to pay higher real estate assessments for the protection they receive.

          • Whitney Wilson

            Actually, in order to get a zoned parking sticker, you have to pay extra (I think its $30 per car per year) (You get one windshield placard for free). So residents in a zoned area do have to pay more for that “privilege.”

          • SayAgain?

            Hmmm…If you are paying real estate taxes on a $1 mil + home, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to be able to park in front of your own home. I’m not sure why people have a problem with that. Give out your streets so those in zoned parking can come park and let you know how it feels.

          • Too Easy

            OMG typical Leach mentality. Let see If It’s a 1M home and your design was so Outdated as not to include a mode of transportation storage you can steal part of the street from the rest of the tax payers. Perfect how about building a porch in the street or better yet MOVE to Fairfax, they have plenty of parking.

          • Too Easy

            $30 dollars a year for restricted parkin,haa haa and you wonder why the county has no money. How about $300 to be fair, heck I would pay that to make my street “private”.

    • TuesdaysChild

      Well said.

  • ForeSight

    Where were these irritated homeowners when all this development was being planned? All their demands should have been addressed years ago. Did they not imagine these eventualities?

    You can’t change the rules once the game has started. It’s not fair to the other team (the business owners moving in, the patrons, the farther-out neighborhoods that become the new parking meccas, et al.)

    • tam

      Hello. They fought it tooth and nail…like the new condos coming behind the church on Highland. We got shut down. You know nothing about what you post.

    • southie

      The County will not change the parking arrangements on the street until they can analyze the impact of the development on traffic in the neighborhood. This is what neighborhoods were told during discussions on the new Giant and the 300 apartments at Penrose Square, plus the 200 new apartments next to it at Sienna Park. Despite what the neighbors were told about waiting for the impact to happen, county staff are pushing a “skinny” 8th Street and reducing the amount of street parking for residents and visitors.

    • Ann of Tan Gables

      When the Market Common was being planned, LV residents had a series of meetings to discuss the impact of the project, and at one meeting, a police officer explained what residents would need to do to get zoned parking on a particular street. So the policy, and residents’ awareness of the policy, has been there for a long time.
      Even then, Fillmore has 24-hour zoning.

      • Lyon Village

        God Bless the Villager who has it all.

    • Thes

      County policy, which you can find here, specifies that zoned parking requires a survey demonstrating a real problem, not imagination of a potential problem. That’s a good thing. If we put zoned parking wherever people merely feared parking overspill, probably every street in Arlington would be zoned by now.

  • LyonSteve

    You haven’t seen anything yet.

    Just wait for Trader Joe’s to open this summer.

    • AllenB

      Can’t wait! Bring on TJ’s!

  • charlie

    the majority of the people in this block of Highland Street are new residents. A quick review of transactions shows that houses were bought in the following decades: (Market Common opened in November 2003, FYI).
    60’s 1 6.25%
    70’s 2 12.50%
    80’s 1 6.25%
    90’s 5 31.25%
    00’s 7 43.75%
    16

    • CW

      Thanks Charlie!! So how about those people defending the old timers who have supposedly seen the neighborhood go to crap before their eyes? (And that is if by crap you mean the most desirable place to live). These residents are all just big-money folks who bought at the middle or top of the bubble and knew exactly what they were getting into. It’s just that once they staked their claim they now want it cut off from everybody else.

      • arlgirl

        No. We just want to be able to park.

        Any inside info on my Sweetgreen? I might be willing to give up one of the spaces in front of my house for it.

        • CW

          Haha, well I hope you understand I keep harping on the Sweetgreen point you made because it’s like the perfect example of the hypocrisy that seems to pervade this neighborhood. Keep the outsiders out and away from my house, but bring on all the awesome amenitites that are attracted by their money.

          Speaking to your point – you know that they have the Sweetflow Mobile right? Idk if it’s permitted to do business in Arlington but they get around in the district. Darn good frozen yogurt. 🙂 They could park it right in front of your house like you asked!

          • arlgirl

            At least we agree on our mutal distaste for the mammoth new Craftsman homes.

            I tell you what—we can park the Sweetgreen truck in front of my neighbors house. They aren’t around much.

            And- I am a walking contradiction. Who says we shouldn’t be able to have it all?

            On that note–there are many things I am willing to sacrifice for living in a ‘mini city’. The new Brookstone white noise machine is working great.

    • LyonSteve

      Shh.. no one wants any facts here.

      BTW, I’ve seen parking enforcement pickup trucks in this area late at night. So those who ignore these signs at night, they are watching.

    • Anon

      uhhh your numbers show the majority of people purchased their house before Market Common opened, and likely before parking issues occurred.

      • charlie

        i used Market Common date as a point of reference. most of the parking issues seem related to restaurants and bars. plus most of market common is closed by 1 AM. the parking problem far predates Market Common.

        • Anon

          I believe its the nightlifers who are causing the problems (late night noise, litter, etc. mentioned above). The 1am cutoff also supports this. The bar scene, while present before, has grown rapidly only in the last year or two.

  • 4 cars?!

    Am I reading this correctly? …”All participating households may receive one FlexPass (described above). Beyond that, each household will generally be allowed up to three vehicle-specific permits. Those who own more than four vehicles at one time will need to park their additional vehicles off-street.”
    http://www.arlingtonva.us/departments/EnvironmentalServices/dot/traffic/parking/EnvironmentalServicesZone.aspx

    So each household gets 3 vehicle-specific permits PLUS a FlexPass PLUS up to 100 guest passes per year that can be used for 3 consecutive days each. How many vehicles are the residents of Lyon Village and Lyon Park hoarding?

    The site does say that some neighborhoods choose to allow fewer permits per household. Can ARLnow tell us how many permits each household receives in these neighborhoods?

  • g$

    Adams Morgan and Georgetown are two of the most notorious areas for lack of parking. They seem to being doing just fine.

    • Raul Mendoza Formoza

      i think if you asked any resident of those areas… the “livability” of the neighborhoods has decreased significantly in recent years. The lack of available parking in those neighborhoods significantly reduces the property value of homes without private parking.

      • g$

        Agreed.

        My post was directed to the posters trying to make the argument that Clarendon would lose $/business by trying to support zone parking in the residential areas.

        The residential neighborhoods need to be protected and- if need be–additional commercial parking may be provided/planned for. The fact that this area has Metro access is a huge advantage as well.

  • g$

    and they don’t even have a Metro stop.

  • Chad

    I’m so angry and I don’t know why.

    • MB

      Sounds like you have a bright future as an ARLnow.com commenter.

  • John Fontain

    Which makes more sense: 1. Neighboring residents park in a pay garage because they can’t find parking on their street or 2. Folks visiting from Centreville park in a pay garage.

    I don’t live in BCN Village, but I do support these parking restrictions. It makes no sense to make the residents park in pay garages when the folks visiting can do so. In other words, the residents shouldn’t have to pay for parking just because visitors don’t like to do so.

    As an aside, I’ve seen lots of $5 parking rates around Clarendon recently and it sure does make me long for the days of free parking in the empty gas station lot that used to sit across the street from the old Blockbuster video right in the heart of Clarendon. Those were the days….

  • J

    I live on one of the blocks whose parking restrictions was recently changed and I’m truly sorry if you now find it inconvenient to shop, drink and eat in Clarendon.

    Obviously, I walk to these establishments. If you can’t do that or take the Metro, there are more than 600 metered street parking spots and 2,400 parking spaces in garages around the neighborhood, at a price as low as $2 for the whole evening.

    I know that you’ve found it convenient to park on my block for free, but your choice comes at a cost of my ability to have friends visit, since they frequently couldn’t find anywhere to park within blocks. And yes, I realize the hypocrisy there, since I want you to park in a garage so my friends can be more welcome. But put yourself in my shoes.

    We wanted to be hospitable to our friends. The county gave we property owners the ability to petition for a change to the parking restrictions in our neighborhood. And knowing that there were plenty of other parking options available to those coming to frequent the local shops and restaurants, we took it.

    Attack me for my Volvo, my style of dress or my choice of where to live, but do respect that I made a choice to make my life (and that of my visitors) hassle-free. If you’re dissatisfied with that or with the extremely cheap paid parking options in Clarendon, then perhaps you should try somewhere else for your entertainment. We won’t miss you.

    • Ditto what arlgirl and J said. We recently moved into lyon park from Richmond in the fan district and the level of drunks running around on the weekends is similar to the fan (and that ‘hood has a large undergrad population -go rams!). Since we’ve moved in apparently drunken meatheads have ripped out our gardening and also torn tree limbs off of large old trees AND DUMPED THEM ON CARS ON OUR STREET. We pick up empty miller lite cans (seriously, that stuff is garbage both literally and figuratively) on the weekend from the very inconsiderate folks walking (and yelling) to and from the bars. These are the types of actions I personally believe have contributed to why the “locals” want extended protection on parking –apparently certain people cannot police themselves so then everyone else suffers.

      • Danielle

        I tried to buy a house in Lyon Village to actually live in but BCN got it and tore it down. After reading this I’m glad I moved elsewhere if it’s really this bad there. I’d hate to wake every morning to vandalism – especially considering what you pay to live there. People just seem miserable complaining about parking, vandalism, and – not long ago- the low income housing coming in.

        • Lyon Village

          But, hey, we got rid of the DHS clients thanks to Mary’s and Barb’s support. And we got paid parking, too, in the old DHS building – more income for the Board to spend!

    • CW

      I think that there is a distinction that I’d like to make here. My personal position isn’t about whether or not people should be allowed to park in front of your houses, or whether or not they cause crime. These are separate issues to me. The thing that I’m curious about it more of a procedural or policy one, which is that I’d like to know more about how these regulations came into effect. You mention that: “The county gave we property owners the ability to petition for a change to the parking restrictions in our neighborhood.” Where did this unilateral power come from? Was this discussed at a board meeting of some sort? Was public input taken? I’m sure that business owners would have been opposed. I am just mostly curious about the process through which this came to be more than anything.

      • Thes

        CW, please, please read any of the several links above, which describe the whole system in detail, including how it got approved and how it works. It’s in the code. It’s not a mystery.

      • CW

        Ok, thanks for pointing that out. But it does still seem that the residents are given unilateral power to impose these regulations. Given that they have that authority, why would any neighborhood ever NOT petition for these restrictions? Seems somewhat one-sided. Not saying that it should or should not be that way, just that, as public policies go, the deck seems a bit stacked.

        • Mark

          To start, I think you have to get a majority of the neighborhood to agree to the restrictions. And there is a downside, like having to get guest passes for guests, etc. If you don’t need the restrictions to address a problem, it’s easier not to have to deal with it.

        • Ann of Tan Gables

          Most streets don’t have enough nonresidents parking on them to trigger the restrictions. It’s a pretty high threshold to clear; even on a day when lots of people are parking on streets perpendicular to Franklin, they nonresident cars often only come halfway down the block. That won’t get you to 60%.

        • tam

          The county does surveys—at least 3 of them. The petitions can be (and have been)denied in certain areas. If the changes have been made—serious need has been shown.

          Residents due trump those that don’t even live in Arlington…as 99% of the cars coming to park on the weekends.

          • South Arlington

            Is your 99% figure based on these surveys also? Or is it blatantly fabricated? I think you vastly underestimate the number of Arlingtonians that drive to Clarendon, especially for things like dining. You’ve now also essentially closed off your (soon to be expensively renovated) dog park from the rest of the county since we can no longer park there on weekends.

  • Zoned parking is bulls—.

    • John Fontain

      When the problem is on your block it isn’t.

      • Too Easy

        Nobody makes you own more cars than you have driveway space. Nobody make you not have a driveway either. Try living with a resonable amount of stuff.

  • NOVApologist

    This is one of the best threads I have read on this site. Hyperbole (“no one can use you[r] road”); class warfare (“These residents are all just big-money folks”); conspiracies (“If they had the power to ban cars, they would have. That’s what happens when you live in a place controlled by control freak doo gooder liberals”). It’s entertainment gold.

    Although I am a little disappointed with the scarcity of “brown flip-flop” references.

    • tam

      It’s not really class warfare…a lot of those knocking the villagers are living in the surrounding expensive condos and apartments. They just are younger. In about 15-20 years they’ll understand.

      Anyone coming in to drink and eat in Clarendon is not having financial issues.

      • Not a fan

        Tam, your condescension belies an ignorance of the facts. I live in one of those ‘surrounding expensive condos’ and my immediate neighbors are a 50-year old woman, a 40 year old man, a 65 year-old woman, 30-year old man, a 20-something old woman and a 30-something couple with a toddler. And believe me, we are all old enough to “understand” the situation very well. The parking restrictions that keep the loud drunken visitors from parking in YOUR neighborhood force them to park in OUR neighborhood. What we do NOT understand is why YOUR needs for peace and quiet are more important OUR needs for the very same thing, and why Arlington policy permits those living in the surrounding side streets to reap all the benefits of living in our neighborhood without sharing the inconvenience. After all, we vote and pay taxes, too.

        • CW

          +100.

          I live in a building full of plenty of people who are in their 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, and beyond. The building is extremely high density, with hundreds of people living in a single block. We have to drive down several levels to park below the public parking reserved for the “drunken hordes” that the LV elitists are pushing out into our homes. Why is that fair? You can argue that we CHOSE to live in a building with that layout, and that’s a reasonable argument. But the extension of that argument is that the LV aristocracy CHOSE to buy $1M+ houses that didn’t have adequate parking. So either accept that NIMBYism should be class-blind and location-blind, or accept that parking should be allocated in a manner that does not simply favor those who have a certain class status.

        • Josh S

          Well, that’s nonsensical. If your building is located in the middle of the restaurant/bar/shopping area itself, why would you expect to be free of the people patronizing those locations? In contrast, if you live in a residential neighborhood nearby, with nothing but single family homes on your street, why would it be unreasonable to have a different expectation of peace and quiet, etc?

          • T

            Exactly! These brand new buildings were built with nightclubs and restaurants underneath them. You knew that before you bought or rented. You are living directly in the business district.

          • CW

            Read my post – both of you. Yes, we did choose to live in the business district. Just how LV residents chose to live adjacent to it. Both of those choices have repercussions. The LV residents, however, believe that they are high-and-mighty enough to have the nanny county come protect them from the straw men, boogeymen, and sasquatches that are terrorizing their bucolic little community (which happens to be located only minutes from several metro stations, dozens of restaurants, and many other attractions.)

          • Ann of Tan Gables

            And when the commercial areas were being developed, the county was assuring residents of the SFH neighborhoods that the parking policy, which has been in effect for years, could be invoked as needed to ensure that visitors to the commercial areas would not tying up residential streets. You may not want to live in a place that has such policies, you may be sorry you bought your house, but this is not a new thing. The county looked ahead, the long-term residents looked ahead, but you did not, evidently do your research. Or your deep yoga breaths.

          • mehoo

            It’s one thing to say they should have to put up with these problems. It’s quite another to deny they exist.

          • Arlington, Northside

            Bingo, and those residential sections were built decades before the bars and resturants arrived.

  • In all the comparisons to Georgetown or elsewhere in DC, why has no one brought up an obvious difference here:

    Zoned parking in DC usually allows 2 hours of parking without a permit. That’s the default unless the City Council elevates it (which it has, on a few streets near Eastern Market). In Arlington, zoned parking allows NO out-of-neighborhood parkers whatsoever during zoned hours (unless invited by a resident). A few neighborhoods have opened their zoned parking to two-hour outsiders, but very few.

    LV even has restrictively zoned parking near Lee Highway on Highland. At times during the tennis-court reconstruction, half of the visitor spots were taken up by construction equipment, and with the rest filled, I couldn’t park anywhere with my 4-year-old cousin to take her to the playground during the day. Even for an hour.

    It’s really necessary to block people from parking for an hour on your street?

    • (And in that back Lee-Highway/Highland section of the neighborhood, there isn’t a single commercial lot within a 10-minute walk to pay to park in.)

    • CJ

      To be fair those that live around that park have the same parking problems when they try to park around other popular Arlingotn parks outside of their own neighborhood.

      • South Arlington

        Big difference: those people are ALLOWED to park at any of the other parks. They may have to search for parking but they won’t be ticketed for parking in Penrose to visit Penrose or Butler-Holmes park for instance. We now are not allowed and will be ticketed if we dare park and visit the Lyon Village dog park and park.

        • CJ

          I used to live by the park and there were no restrictions on the weekend (8-5pm zone M-Friday). The 8-5pm was put in place AGES ago to stop the influx of ppl coming to park for the Metro. There are some open 2 hour spaces preserved around the perimeter. The construction is temporary. I was not aware that the restrictions that far down have been changed. I think Fri from 5pm-Monday morning are still wide open.

          • South Arlington

            The dog park is certainly in the area affected by the new parking regulations.

          • south arl too

            awwww, poor little s. arlington can’t drive to stinkin’ clarendon to the dog park. And why would you want to do that anyway? watch out, N. arl will start comin’ after you, since S arl has 5 of 8 total dog parks. such injustice, the outrage!

          • South Arlington

            If the county is going to drop 7 figures of the tax dollars we pay on a big water feature and completely remodeled Lyon Village dog park, I fully intend to take my pooch there and get some of my money’s worth. It’s too bad it’s a private park now.

          • south arl too

            Looks like the renovation is for more than just a dog park http://www.arlnow.com/2010/10/21/upgrades-to-clarendon-dog-park-rely-on-bond-issue/ But let’s see, the 4MR dog parks have water features. Oh, and not to mention all the open space in the W&OD/FMR corridor.

  • Arlington, Northside

    People did not park in the neighborhood to go bar hopping ten years ago. These home owners have the right to be upset with drunks loudly walking to their hopefully designated drivers’ vehicles at 1am. I have a lot of friends who have owned homes in there since before even Whitlow’s opened up shop. Back then there was plenty of parking for all at the old Sears Automotive lot, what is now Clarendon Commons, with not that many place to go to. Now tons of places, but also an adequate amount of parking, although I would like to know about this magical all night $2 garage.

    • South Arlington

      Then allow 2 hours of parking. That should thwart the bargoers that park there for a night. As it is, the parks and dog park in Lyon Park are now essentially private parks as no one outside of Zone 6 can drive and park at them. Why should the County taxpayer be forced to fund these de facto private parks? Even Georgetown allows 2 hours of parking on it’s streets. If the Lyon Villagers want private, guaranteed parking then they should build private driveways.

      • Arlington, Northside

        Georgetown has been a social gather place for two hundred years, anyone alive that bought a place in Georgetown knew what they were getting. Most owners in Claredon did not buy into what it has become, they bought into a quite neighborhood with parks they could walk to. There is no reason you can’t park in the non-restricted areas and walk to the parks.

      • Anon

        You are aware there are metered spots (and garages for that matter) all around Clarendon, within a few blocks of the dog park, right? I’ve always found a spot within 5 minutes on a weekend.

        • Maria

          Ugh, thank you. I was about to point that out.

          Irrationality… Makes me. So. Mad.

        • Too Easy

          You drive your dog .. to a park to exersise?? Good thing you found parking.

          • Anon

            Of course not. But I do occasionally drive to Clarendon and know there are tons of metered spots by the dog park.

      • sue

        When I use the trails at the Georgetown Harborfront…I try to get there early enough to park at a meter spot–if not I go to one of the public parking garages. The streets immediately surrounding the dog park have parking meters. When those are full- there are plenty of parking garages nearby. A lot of what Arlington is doing is trying to encourage walking and less cars. The amount of residents coming to the corridor from all of the brand new apt/condo buildings (and soon to be built) is huge.

    • The old DHS building (where PNC bank was until last month) has $2 all-night parking. Really, if you’re going to go out to dinner or barhop in Clarendon, the garage parking isn’t that much of a burden.

      The bigger issue to me, as I mentioned, is the fairness of keeping out everyone even those who only want to park for an hour or two to go to a park.

      If there were metered parking sprinkled along residential streets in LV (perhaps multispace meters that were only enforced against people without permits), I wouldn’t have a problem.

      The issue to me isn’t so much that it’s not free. It’s that it’s NOT ALLOWED at all.

      Windermere, Florida, did something similar when they didn’t want to allow access to their public lakes. They prohibited non-town-residents from parking within a quarter-mile of the boat ramps. They changed course when the press got bad and Orange County came down on them.

      • CW

        Thanks for using that example, because Windermere is pretty much the shining beacon when it comes to elitist class-warfare snobbery, even more so than LV, if that can be imagined.

        Could you imagine if Arlington had gated communities?!!

        • Observer

          And CW, I think what Joey was saying is what this whole thing comes down to. If Lyon Village really just wanted to control the late night weekend bargoers and improve the cycling of parking of spots to ensure more openings for residents, restricting the parking to 2 hours would have sufficed. 2 hour parking would have allowed people coming to the area for shopping, dining or the parks/dog park, and it doesn’t sound like those visitors to Clarendon are causing the problems. By making this zone parking pretty much all the time, 7 days a week, Lyon Village has asserted that their roads are only for Lyon Village residents. I think the impression given by completely closing off their roads to non-residents is what’s giving off the odor of elitism, classism and NIMBYism. The crass responses from LV residents like sue and arlgirl are only making things worse.

          • CW

            Couldn’t agree with you more. I was just happy that Joey invoked a Windermere reference. Having lived in the Orlando area, I can personally vouch that it is the perfect analog to this sort of snobbery. (Actually, to be fair, Windermere attains a level of snobbery of which LV residents can only dream)

  • tam

    then you may have a valid point! That sucks.

  • BallstonDude

    This sounds (or rather looks) like the perfect opportunity for garage owners to raise the price of their parking.

  • NOVApologist

    I drove through Lyons Village on a regular basis last winter and found it far worse than most neighborhoods.

  • Lamawhat

    The county spokesperson is wrong….’County spokeswoman Shannon Whalen McDaniel says the new signs went up on Monday, March 18.’

    The signs went up in early December and were enforced starting 27 December.

    • Are you saying the signs on this stretch of Highland Street went up in December?

      • sue

        Look—this is absolutely painful. Why don’t you worry about the signs in your own Columbia Pike neighborhood?

        The signs have all been changed at varying times…depending on when the residents petitioned for a change, when the 3 required surveys were done and when the county got around to physically changing the signs. This is not new or breaking news for those of us that live on the streets or use them on a daily basis.

        If you don’t actually live on any of the street with the changes then you have absolutely no idea the amount of impact the growth ‘JUST IN THE LAST 6-12 months’ has had on the parking situation. Thankfully, the county is supportive of its RESIDENTS.

        The hypocrisy here is astounding.

        • SayAgain?

          Sue, get’s it!!

          • sue

            Definitely not a fair and bias site. The speeding and traffic sign running all in a hunt to beat the next guy to the one neighborhood parking spot has become so dangerous for the numerous young children in this neighborhood.

            Just as all of the anti-villagers that abound on this site want us to realize the neighborhood has changed…must also realize the neighborhood has changed. The more an area becomes like a city, the more restrictive the parking becomes and the harder it is to find. They can start going to entertain themselves at strip mall bars further outside of the city for their free 8+-hour parking. Given the public transportation and the high number of residents and workers living around the businesses…business will do just find without them.

  • The irritating speed bumps everywhere in LV are best proof of ridiculousness of LV. County also redesigned the intersection of the highland and lee at what I”m sure was huge cost a number of years ago to place a curve intended to slow traffic. Seems like tax dollars could be better spent than catering to LV whining.

    • val

      They actually need more speed bumps, as does every residential street in the county. The speed limit is 25!

  • Too Easy

    Arlington needs to stop giving away these permits. It costs more for a county decal showing you paid your taxes than it does for a benifit parking decal and guest freebies. A sidewalk has a special assesment cost along with it and so should a reserved parking space on public property. Any program that depends on violators to fund it is a failure.In a time where the county is cutting programs and jobs is when it needs to reconsider giving away benifits to the people who are flush with cash and are already using up more than the amount they put in. The permit holder base is a perfect place to start recapturing the lost tax revenue.

  • Manifesto

    To you Bud-lite swiggin’, driveway pooping (yes… really), too-fast driving, bad parking, lazy SOBs who can’t cab or take the metro:

    You have made your opinion clear from your statements and disgusting and dangerous actions that you have no respect for the neighborhood through which you frolic. So, as a “tenacious, squeaky wheel” LV resident I pledge the following (on a personal, not a community basis):

    1. If you speed down Franklin (usually narrowly missing my children) I will take your license plate and report you- it may not do anything but it will make me feel better and *might* tip the scales when you get your inevitable DUI.
    2. If you run the clear “do not enter sign” at Franklin and Highland I will take your license plate and report you
    3. If you park overhanging my tiny driveway- I will call and harangue APD until you are towed
    4. If you hang out and drink/frolic/poop/pee in my yard APD will be called immediately and the hose will follow
    5. I will no longer nicely warn people not to park in the Walgreen’s lot, instead I will pass tips to the tow-spotter (and maybe pick up a buck or two). The pathetic sound of your BMW/Audi/Acura car-alarm as your car is dragged away will put a smile on my face each and every time. In fact, I shall crack a beer and toast your pain. This shall make me quite drunk most weekends.
    6. I will immediately initiate a block campaign to restrict your parking on my block 7 days a week.
    7. I will initiate a block campaign to install as many speed bumps as possible to slow you fools down
    8. I will clock you at the 1 hr parking areas and call APD at 60 minutes and 1 second. Then I’ll give the parking dude a soda and an annual Festivus card.
    9. I will feed the birds in the street trees berries so that they cover your car in purple goo.
    10. Whenever possible I will park in the middle of my curb stretch to limit parking to maybe 1 Smart car on each end.
    11. I will wave to passing cyclists (hipsters or not) and scowl at everyone else.

    What the assembled commentators are missing is that this has little to do with parking and everything to do with neighborhood respect. We live here, we raise our children here and no, we don’t all live in BCN monstrosities. I’m happy to walk a block to my (small) house and I recognize that some parking issues “come with the territory”- it’s the amazing (and filthy) disrespect that comes with the parking that frustrates me.

    Stop speeding and running stop signs- you WILL kill a kid
    If you Park, park and go someplace else to party- I’m tired of the 1am yelling and piles of trash in the morning (if I’m serious about anything above, I’m serious about taking a hose to you)
    When you park, do so intelligently- if you block our tiny driveways we have to park on the street which limits your parking!

    • LyonSteve

      Two things

      1) Why are your kids out when the drunks are leaving the bars?
      2) The short one way stretch on Franklin near Highland is ridiculous. It’s been like that for years, but still extremely ridiculous. I’ve seen people go through it, but most obey that sign, as ridiculous as it (as well as the bulb out) is. Again, I know that its been around for many years.

      Lastly, I got a chuckle out of your post although I’m not sure if your serious or not.

      • sue

        the drunks are here all Saturday and Sunday afternoons watching sporting events at Whitlows and the surrounding bars. The young ppl looking for parking to meet for their booze-filled brunches come wheeling around the corners…brazenly blowing completely through stops signs and going down the ‘do not enter’ street.

      • sue

        it is too narrow for the cars approaching highland and the ones turning onto Franklin (usu. at 50+mph). In the past–the head-on collisions forced the one-way entry. Just like Bethesda and other areas with urban/suburban co-mingling smart urban planning deters from using residential areas as major cut-throughs for traffic…they limit those to the main, larger roads which can handle it.

      • Manifesto

        Deadly serious on the speeding. Definitely serious on the hose (oh yes, I will catch you mad-pooper… oh yes), maybe serious about the feeding the birds berries, somewhat serious on the rest.

    • CW

      Here’s the thing though: I agree with everything you say, EXCEPT the 7-day-a-week parking restriction. Turn the hose on the drunks. Hell, turn a pellet gun on them for what I care (no, actually, please don’t). Call the cops on the illegal parkers. Yell at the damn kids wearing brown flip flips and eating cupcakes and pizza to get off your lawn. Enforce the rules. That’s what policing is – enforcing the rules. The problem that I have is the extension here to an implicit root cause and the valuation of some outcomes over others. What I mean is that people park in your neighborhood. They have for years. With that comes drunks, trash, defecation, whatever. However, you’re implying that that is all that comes with this parking AND that curbing those negative effects is worth the other effects of eliminating parking altogether. This is the part with which I disagree. This is the same logic that led us to Prohibition. This is the same logic that says that we should ban automobiles, since the loss of even one life is too high a price to pay for convenience in transportation. I do not agree with this sort of logic.

      I agree with your concerns as well as the similar concerns of others, like Arlgirl, for example. However, it is your plan to wage total war against this one subset of offenders without regard for the collateral dama with which I take issue.

    • mehoo

      Go dude go!

      I will wave back from my bike, if I haven’t already.

    • mehoo

      A couple of ideas for you, Manifesto:

      1. Can you get traffic calming measures like speed humps? (Maybe they’re already there, I can’t remember)

      2. I wonder if you can post a sign saying “cars blocking the driveway will be towed” and then just call a towtruck yourself? I don’t know the legalities of that, but the sign might be enough to prevent it.

      • Manifesto

        How about just using a reciprocating saw and cutting off the offending bumpers? 😉

        Speed humps can be requested by a similar process as the NP signs and have been installed on numerous streets in LV (Edgewood, Danville, etc). It’s a good approach but the practice of some drivers swerving into the curb to avoid the hump actually causes some problems (only a problem when there is parking…).

  • CW

    Oh my god…this thing is still going? 300+ posts!!

  • charlie

    310 — is this a new record for ArlNow?

    • Yes it is.

      • charlie

        are congrats in order, i ask? not sure.

  • Clarendon Dweller

    Like it or not people are going to be walking and driving through your neighborhood. There will be free parking somewhere in Lyon Village and people will find it and walk. All of this comes with the territory of living near a busy strip (whether it was that way when you moved there or not). If you don’t like it and your children are in danger MOVE – it’s only going to get busier and you cannot keep people out of your neighborhood.

    • mehoo

      How many times are we going to hear that old saying “if you don’t like it, move?”

      How about this:

      Like it or not, there are going to be parking restrictions in an urban area. You will have to walk further or pay for parking or use public transportation to get to your bars. If you don’t like it, move.

      Works just as well.

      • david

        Well said.

        Though I must add I did move out of Clarendon for many of the reasons that are being stated. The drunks are frustrating so I feel their pain.

  • C

    The VAST majority of the streets in Lyon Village have the same parking restrictions that have been there for the past TWENTY years, e.g., M-F 8-5pm permit only.

    It is only a very few streets directly adjacent to the businesses/Wilson Blvd that have been changed in direct response to the dramatic increase in volume.

    Apparently, people are unwilling to walk an extra block or two to the bars because the parking problem has yet to filter into the farther reaches of the subdivision.

    The fact that a very minor number of streets changing thier parking restrictions when the strip has changed dramatically in the last 12 months is hardly news-worthy…but it gives the anti-LV haters something to bark about.

    • T

      The fact they can’t be bothered to walk an extra block in Lyon Village says it all. I think it was maybe 2-3 blocks that have had their signs/restrictions changed. A really minor impact.

      I love the slant on this website. Free to attack the LV neighborhood with insults and ‘crass comments’ but if it is given back in the same manner it is highly insulting and shows our character.

      Dish out- but can’t take it back.

  • mehoo

    Wow, all this anger over a few parking spots. How many empty spots will this cause people to have to pass up? 3 or 4 at a time?

    Just go park in one of the garages. It’s cheap and convenient. Or try to take Metro, cab, bike, bus, etc.

    It’s funny to see people point to the residents of these streets and say “you live in an urban area so deal with it!” when living in an urban area means you should learn to deal with the fact that you can’t park anywhere you want.

  • Overgrown Bush

    I think the resident should be able to meter the space in front of their house, for whatever price they choose, and share the proceeds with the county. This way, the free market dictates. If the price is too high, the spot remains empty. If the homeowner wants to get a little income because he/she does not need the space then so be it.

  • R.Griffon

    Wow. I can’t believe this has gone over 300 posts in just over a day! And to think that in my mind this was such a non-issue; more of an FYI than a news post in the proper sense. The people railing against it act like they’ve never seen resident-only permit parking, despite that it’s a common sight all over the District and NOVA, particularly anywhere within stone’s throw of a Metro station. It’s as common as having to pay for parking around popular destinations, but I digress.

    I think the fact that so many comments and such vitriol would arise out of such a mundane topic is indicative of a much deeper divide between several groups. It seems the single-family homeowners, the condo/apartment crowd, and the out-of-towners REALLY have a lot deep seeded animosity towards one another. Hopefully it’s just a case of an outspoken minority not really representing the rest. Otherwise, it’s just really sad.

    Also, the system doesn’t seem to be nesting response comments anymore. Did we break it?!

  • Josh

    I have no issues with the parking, but from now on will make sure to poop on all these a-hole high and mighty Arlington residents houses…

  • brendan

    I think these posts alone kind of come off as site-sanctioned trolling.

    There are several other places in the county with zoned parking (22 zones in all!) that for the most part, and not surprisingly, are located in neighborhoods adjacent to commercial zones. As I’ve said before – it’s a minimalist and fair strategy to create a reasonable buffer between commercial zones and neighborhoods.

    I know Lyon Village and the Clarendon area are some of the favorite targets of ARLnow trolls but posts like these, focused solely on a single neighborhood when it’s a county-wide issue, definitely feed into that.

  • R0bespierre

    Supply and demand, when more people demand something (parking) than is available, the supply is controlled and hierarchized according to priority. Priority goes to the people who live there. Which part is too difficult for transient people to understand? The reasonable hierarchy choice, or the supply problem? Oh that’s right, it’s not a rational argument, it’s a resenting high earners and home owners argument.

    Well ha ha ha ha ha! Poverty builds character. Now pay for parking.

  • Lyon Village Resident

    Many Lyon Village residents have had problems with some of the bar patrons at night- ringing our doorbells, leaving (often broken) beer bottles and worse on our property,throwing up on our sidewalks,etc. Might you have other ideas as to how we can minimize these problems without restricting parking? What would you suggest if you lived here?

    • syzygy

      My suggestion would be to sell your house and move somewhere else. If you want a peaceful Fairfax City vibe, I suggest googling “Fairfax City”
      I have now twice observed first-hand a most fascinating phenomenon…I sold my place at 17th and U in 1998 because I couldn’t tolerate the changes in the neighborhood, and made a killing…..then sold my condo in Ballston because I couldn’t tolerate the changes in the neighborhood (never particularly like it in the first place, though), and made a killing again. It seems people are willing to pay up for places that might seem like a cool notion in theory, but suck in practice.
      I have about the same amount of sympathy for people in LV as I do for people who have homes threatened by beach erosion on barrier islands…neighborhoods, like beaches, are dynamic systems, not snapshots…it’s going to change, and more often than not the direction of those changes are very predictable. To overlook that (and in some cases actively avoid acknowledging it) is simply foolish.

  • SteveB

    I’m not so sure why people are so fired up about this. When I first heard that the free garage was going away, my first thought was that the neighbors here would petition for more restrictive neighborhood zoned parking. If I owned a house in the neighborhood, I’d probably do the same.

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