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New Curb Extension Blocks Off Right-Turn Lane in Ballston, Prompting Headaches for Drivers

Ballston’s bevy of construction projects has led to another headache for drivers near Wilson Blvd.

Workers recently wrapped up some work on sidewalks at the intersection of N. Randolph Street and Wilson Blvd, near a trio of large construction projectsBallston QuarterBallston Exchange and Liberty Center. That included the installation of a new curb extension designed to make life a bit easier on pedestrians, who were previously a bit baffled by construction at the intersection.

But the downside of that sidewalk work is that the newly finished curb blocks off most of N. Randolph Street’s right-turn lane. The road frequently gets backed up, particularly during the evening rush hour, creating crowded conditions on the side street.

County officials say they’re aware of the problem and are hoping to fix it, but the wet weather has made that a bit of a challenge.

“The curb extension was constructed and [lane] re-striping usually follows,” Jessica Baxter, a spokeswoman for the county’s Department of Environmental Services, told ARLnow. “This is weather-dependent and requires that no moisture be on the pavement.”

Baxter says that work is now set to take place next Saturday (Feb. 23).

In the meantime, she said the developer managing the project has placed traffic cones in the lane to make it clear that drivers can’t use the lane.

“The right lane will go away while the next lane over will become either a thru lane or right turn lane,” Baxter said.

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