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by ARLnow.com Sponsor — May 25, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

The end of the school year is fast approaching for many Arlington families. Judging by the number of “OBX” stickers on the back of local minivans and other family haulers, parents around Arlington have that trip to the beach, summer camp for the kids, or a week of playing tourist on staycation planned at this point.

As emergency managers, we have similar plans, but we’re always thinking about contingencies. Common events like a severe thunderstorm or major traffic accident can quickly alter the day’s plan and sometimes evening plans. Here are some thoughts about family preparedness potential chaos this summer.

For vacations, summer camp and other family options over the summer, parents who have been through the end of the school year process before may remember tumbling into a new daily routine of altered timelines in the morning and evening. This can often occur week after week and in an emergency, it is hard to remember simple things such as new contact numbers or find a list allergies or prescription information.

Summer Camp

There seems to be an endless number of summer camp options for Arlington kids (including HERricane), though they fill up quickly. Summer camp checklists usually include a quick list:

  • Backpack (labeled with name and phone)
  • Lunch and snack (nut-free)
  • Water bottle
  • Sunblock
  • Insect Repellent
  • Change of clothes for younger campers
  • Plastic bag (wet clothing)

Depending on the type of summer camp, other items may be on the list, and these camps typically have emergency contact information and health histories submitted during registration. Outside of camp, these items are a good starting place to ensure your child has a baseline go-bag. Parents may consider including a hard copy of the family emergency plan and a small bag with band-aids and other first aid items.

Home for the Summer / Staycation

There are many child care scenarios at home during the summer. Staying with grandparents, or at home with nannies and child care providers is a common summer solution for working families. Add their numbers to your Arlington Alert account, or better yet, have them sign up for Arlington Alert. In addition to your phone number(s) these trusted individuals need an adult oriented family communications plan, so they can reach parents or help give doctors and emergency responders important information.

This also applies to parents staying home with the kids. Mom or dad may be home with a slate of activities and field trips for the kids, but in the event of a tornado, will everyone know where to shelter during a tornado, or be able to return home a different way.

Vacation

Heading to the beach? Preparing for kids will be similar to the summer camp, especially when it comes to sunblock. If this is a road trip, car kits should already have things like emergency blankets, a flashlight, a few water bottles and jumper cables. Not all people plan ahead, so note pharmacies, grocery and convenience store locations close to the beach (look for seagulls), and remember to print an extra hard copy of the family communications plan for the glove compartment.

For more information, please visit www.readyarlington.com.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — May 11, 2017 at 3:50 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

If your answer to the headline was heat and drought emergencies — you’re right! And we’ll address that a little later this summer. But let’s drill down to the second and third deadliest weather hazards for a moment: tornadoes and lightning.

We’re entering the season when it seems like we have almost daily thunderstorms, and it can feel like Arlington Alert is notifying you of so many severe weather watches and warnings, you almost stop paying attention. Here’s why you shouldn’t:

What is a Severe Thunderstorm?

A severe thunderstorm is any storm that produces hail at least 1 inch or larger, or wind that is 58mph or higher. Don’t be fooled by the definition — softball-size hail and winds over 100mph have been reported with severe thunderstorms.

Severe thunderstorms also have another potential byproduct: tornadoes, dangerous lightning and flash flooding.

Steps from Safety

Lightning strikes the U.S. 25 million times a year, killing an average of 49 people and injuring hundreds.

Seventy percent of strikes occur during the summer months, and a majority of deaths occur in males, and in people who are outdoors enjoying leisure or sporting activities, like fishing, camping, boating, yard work and beach-going. Many victims of lightning strike were either headed to safety, or just steps away when they were struck.

Tornadoes can, and do, accompany severe thunderstorms

We tend to think of tornadoes as a weather hazard the southern part of the state has to deal with. But as we saw earlier this year, tornadoes are a very real threat of severe thunderstorms. Three tornadoes sprouted from a severe thunderstorm on April 6, injuring one person here in Arlington, and causing damage in Herndon and Arlington as well as in Washington, D.C.

In the April tornadoes, the National Weather Service did not classify the event as a tornado until the next day, so only a Severe Thunderstorm Warning was sent out. This makes it even more important to take every severe thunderstorm warning seriously.

Be Thunderstorm-Safe Every Time

Follow these tips to keep you and your family safe during a severe thunderstorm:

  • Know the Terms:
    • Watch = Severe storm/tornado is possible; monitor weather & local radio for information
    • Warning = TAKE COVER; a severe storm/tornado has been sighted or is about to happen
  • If the Thunder Roars, Go Indoors: If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. Stay inside for at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.
  • Lose the Conductors: Avoid sinks, faucets, tubs, corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity.
  • Seek Safety Immediately
    • Go to a lower level, and stay away from windows and doors
    • Do not lie on concrete floors or lean on concrete walls
    • Get out of, and away from, bodies of water
    • Leave elevated areas, like hills, mountain ridges or peaks
  • Get the Message! Register with Arlington Alert to receive automated National Weather Service alerts. You can also choose to receive emergency notifications and traffic notifications from Arlington at the same time!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — April 27, 2017 at 2:45 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

The question flashes across a screen at a recent Personal & Family Emergency Preparedness workshop for Arlington Network for Community Readiness (ANChoR) volunteers. Participant responses split between the public, the government and community leaders. A collective groan, and then conversation, ensues as they’re told they’re all right — everyone has a role in preparedness.

We cannot prepare alone

Let’s take a look at the numbers: Arlington County has a population of 220,000, which goes up to 300,000 during the day. The Office of Emergency Management has six staff that dedicate a portion of their time to preparedness outreach and education. With those calculations, we would have to reach 4,236 residents per week for 52 weeks to prepare every resident. And this is not even counting the daytime, business population. Clearly this is not possible.

This is why our team of ANChoR volunteers is such a critical resource: they can help our staff extend our reach into the community. They help to host Preparedness Workshops in their communities, staff tables at fairs and community events and connect our office with neighborhoods and networks throughout the county.

Neighbors Helping Neighbors

Following Winter Storm Jonas last year, elderly and informed residents needed help shoveling out their walks so they could receive critical services. While everyone needs to develop a network and plan for themselves, ANChoR volunteers are asked to be a critical part of that network. Volunteers are asked to meet their neighbors before a disaster, and to check on neighbors before and after storms to make sure they’re prepared and okay.

Volunteers do basic preparedness and response in their community, like adopting their local fire hydrant, bus stop or storm drain to keep clear during storms and prevent flooding in their neighborhood.

Many hands make work lighter

When a disaster does strike, we rely on many hands to make a response run smoothly, including ANChoR volunteers. Volunteers train to support the Emergency Operations Center, Watch Desk, Volunteer Reception Center shelters and more.

Volunteers may provide administrative help in the OEM office or serve as controllers and actors during exercises.

Kudos & Thanks

This week is National Volunteer Appreciation Week, and we’d like to recognize and thank the Arlington Network for Community Readiness, as well as all of the emergency support volunteer programs, including the Community Emergency Response Team and Medical Reserve Corps, for their time and service. Their dedication helps make our community safer and more prepared.

Interested in the Arlington Network for Community Readiness or how to help during an emergency? Go to ReadyArlington.com for more information.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — April 13, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

If the answer to that question is never or, that you never knew how, you’re in luck! April 9-15, 2017 is National Public Safety Telecommunicators’ Week, and the perfect time to show appreciation for 9-1-1 Call Takers and Dispatchers everywhere.

The idea for this week-long event was started in 1981 as a local event in Costa County, Va. President George H.W. Bush signed a proclamation in March 1992 inviting all Americans to observe this week so everyone could be made aware of their hard work and dedication to their communities.

What About A 9-1-1 Dispatcher Am I Celebrating, You Ask?

The first voice you hear when you call 9-1-1 is that of a call taker with their calm and reassuring voice. They are highly trained professionals who work with police, fire and medical personnel to get you the help you need. A 9-1-1 dispatcher is available 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year, always ready to handle your call for assistance. In some instances, they can even make the difference between life and death.

Why Do They Have To Ask So Many Questions? Why Don’t They Just Send Me Someone?

Well let’s clear some things up. Emergency 9-1-1 Call/Takers/Dispatchers are trained to prioritize incoming calls: they’re gathering pertinent information from you to make sure the police, fire and/or medical personnel are equipped and prepared to respond before they get to you. They also need certain information to keep not only you as safe as possible, but also to keep the police and fire units safe. This can sometimes mean a lot of questions.

Actually, while they are gathering information from you, the call has already been entered for dispatch, and often, the police and/or fire personnel are already on the way. So, if you’re worried that their questions are causing a delay, don’t be. It is just providing you with the best service possible.

Oh, I Get Why We Should Honor Dispatchers Now! What Kind Of Activities Go On At Arlington’s Emergency Communication Center During This Week Of Celebration?

The week is an opportunity to shine a light on the phenomenally difficult, and often emotionally demanding work, that our 9-1-1 Call Takers/Dispatchers do to keep our community and responders safe. It also gives us a chance to thank them for their long work hours, sacrificed time away from their families (especially during holidays), and their commitment to public safety.

Annual recognition includes: Supervisor of the Year, Trainer of the Year, Teamwork Award, ECC Award of Excellence, Best Leader and Motivator, as well as a Hall of Fame, honoring 9-1-1 dispatchers with 15+ years of service in Arlington County.

How Can I Show Appreciation To My Arlington County 9-1-1 Emergency Dispatcher This Week?

The best way is to write a letter to Jack Brown, Director of the Arlington County Office of Emergency Management, and if you should ever have to call for assistance, a thank you is always appreciated because when you call, they answer.

Saving lives is what dispatchers do!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — March 30, 2017 at 3:15 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

The start of many people’s morning routines includes checking their phone or listening to the weather report:  Is it going to rain today? How warm will it get later? Do I need my umbrella today, or my sunglasses?  We may not think of weather as something consequential here, but the weather has caused most of the disasters in the United States.  

Did you know that:

  • 98 percent of all presidentially declared disasters are weather-related
  • Weather-related disasters lead to around 500 deaths annually nationwide
  • Severe weather causes at least $10 billion in damages in the US every year

These are just a few reasons why the National Weather Service has created the StormReady program.

What is StormReady?

The NWS created StormReady with the goal of creating more weather-resilient communities.

In order to be considered StormReady, a community must:

  • Establish an emergency operations center and 24-hour emergency communications center
  • Have multiple ways to receive and alert severe weather warnings to the public
  • Create a system that monitors weather conditions locally
  • Promote the importance of public readiness through community seminars
  • Develop a formal hazardous weather plan, which includes training severe weather spotters and holding emergency exercises

Arlington County is StormReady

The Arlington County Office of Emergency Management, in collaboration with Arlington Public Schools, has successfully satisfied all of the requirements necessary to be recognized as a StormReady community by the National Weather Service for the third time. The County has done its part to become StormReady. Have you done your part?

What can I do to be StormReady?

  • Get a Kit

Arlington County has around 220,000 residents and only around 320 uniformed employees in its Fire Department. If severe weather hits Arlington and impacts a large portion of the county at once, it would be impossible for first responders to immediately help everyone in need. A good saying to remember is: “The first 72 are on you.” In the event of a large-scale emergency, there is no guarantee that first responders will be able to help you within the first 72 hours. 

Every member of your household should make an emergency kit with at least three days’ worth of food, water, prescriptions, and additional supplies stored and ready to go. Keep in mind that you might not have electricity or gas to prepare food, so choose non-perishable, easy to prepare food.

  • Make a Plan

Keep written contact information with you at all times in case of emergency. Have plans on how to contact each other if cell phone service goes down. What will you and your family do if you can’t reach each other during an emergency? Have predesignated meeting areas both in and out of your neighborhood- in case you can’t return to your home.   

  • Stay Informed

During an emergency, remaining situationally aware is key. Have a NOAA Weather Radio to keep informed of weather threats, listen to TV and radio for instructions and information. Make sure these radios have batteries, and keep spares in your emergency kit.

Stay informed of emergencies by signing up for Arlington Alerts, the County’s notification system that will alert you of emergencies, severe weather and traffic, and other important information via phone, text, email and/or fax.

Talk, prepare, and plan for potential situations now, so you are not scrambling later. Do your part to become StormReady. To learn more about making preparing for emergencies, visit ReadyVirginia.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — March 16, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Ready Arlington VA Tornado Drill BannerIf the weather can be relied on for one thing so far this year, it’s unpredictability. We’ve gone from record-breaking high temperatures to a winter storm warning within one week. Nothing is more unpredictable than tornadoes. While Arlington County has escaped recent severe tornadoes experienced across the rest of the state, they are a real risk. Tornadoes have struck nearly every locality in Virginia. Do you know what to do during a tornado?

March 21 is Tornado Preparedness Day in Virginia. Join the Arlington County Office of Emergency Management and participate in the Statewide Tornado Drill by practicing where to go and what to do during a tornado. Register to hold a Tornado drill at your home or workplace & help to prepare your family and colleagues. Look for our notice at 9:45 a.m. Tuesday, March 21, 2017 on Facebook & Twitter stating the drill has begun. Show us how you prepare by posting a picture of your drill @ReadyArlington’s Facebook/Twitter account.  Review these helpful tips from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM).

Tornado Watches vs. Warnings

Ready Arlington WatchVWarningKnowing when to take action is critical to keeping you and your family safe.

  • Tornado Watch (Be Prepared) A tornado is possible.
  • Tornado Warning (Take Action Immediately) A tornado is already occurring in your area, or will be soon.

What to do during a tornado

Ready Arlington DuckandCoverMost injuries associated with tornadoes are from flying debris, so protect your head. If possible, continue to monitor media to determine when the risk has passed.

  • Home – Go to your basement, safe room, or an interior room away from windows. Don’t forget pets if time allows.
  • Work – Proceed to your tornado shelter location quickly and calmly. Stay away from windows and avoid large open rooms such as cafeterias, gymnasiums, or auditoriums.
  • Outside – Seek shelter inside a sturdy building ASAP. Sheds and storage facilities are not safe.
  • On the road – Vehicles are not safe during a tornado. Drive to the closest shelter. If that’s not possible, either get down in your car and cover your head, or abandon your car and seek shelter in a low-lying area such as a ditch or ravine.

Communications

Getting the warning as soon as possible is critical with tornadoes. Over the last decade, people have significantly changed how they get their news and entertainment, and this puts more importance on the different ways you get important information:

  • NOAA Weather Radios – Available for purchase, these radios often have a distinct alarm the will alert owners when significant weather events occur.
  • Wireless Alert System (WEA) – Messages that appear as text messages on newer smartphones and cell phones automatically to notify you of amber alerts, silver alerts, emergencies where lives may be at risk (such as weather warnings), and Presidential alerts.
  • Arlington Alert – Alerting system used by Arlington County to send emergency, as well as weather and traffic information to residents. Arlington Alert allows you to customize how you want to be notified (such as text, phone, email or App), what you what to be notified about (emergency notifications, weather, traffic) and when.
  • AM/FM Radio and TV – If listening live, radio and TV broadcasts will allow for emergency alerts from the National Broadcast System and local meteorologists on the various local channels and stations

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — March 2, 2017 at 1:00 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Isn’t it appropriate to point out at the beginning of Women’s History Month that a field historically dominated by men has its roots attributed to a woman?

The groundwork for the field of emergency management can be traced back to the Office of Civilian Defense (OCD). The OCD was established by President Roosevelt during WWII to protect civilians and respond to community needs. The development of the agency was largely influenced by a plan drafted by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who helped lead the department as the Assistant Director.

Veterans and retired first responders were tapped to fill the earliest roles in the OCD, so naturally the field was largely male dominated. That trend continues today, with women accounting for only 34 percent of emergency management professionals.

In Arlington, we’re doing much better than the national average, with women representing 44 percent of our emergency management staff, and we’re working to close that gap further by offering programs like HERricane Arlington, a summer camp to develop girls ages 13-17, into our future emergency managers and leaders.

While our staff had very few female industry leaders to look up to as they developed into emergency managers, they didn’t lack for professional role models. We asked our OEM staff who they found inspiring, and although their responses varied in time periods and career paths, there were two common themes: all of the women were outspoken, and all pushed the social norms for their time period.

Ready Arlington, Jennifer Aniston in 2012 (photo via Wikimedia Commons)Amanda Nicoll – Watch Desk Officer

Jennifer Aniston: “She continues to have grace and decorum while going through a very public ordeal. She is a philanthropist while making people laugh. She has always fought back against critics who felt she needed to get married and have children. How she has handled all of these things encourages me to do the same.”

Ready Arlington Margaret Thatcher, (photo via Wikimedia Commons)Elizabeth Dexter – Watch Desk Officer

Margaret Thatcher: “She stayed true to herself, even though those around her doubted her abilities. She did not let anything get in her way.

Even when her opponents threw up road blocks, she pushed through, never losing sight of her end goals. And she succeeded.”

Ready Arlington, Amelia Earhart (photo via Wikimedia Commons)Lauren Stienstra – Senior Manager, Research and Policy Development

Amelia Earhart: “In the fourth grade, we were required to give a speech to our class on a personal hero, and I chose Amelia Earhart. Her sense of adventure, underscored by her grit and determination, resonates with me as strongly now as it did then.

She built an impressive career in a man’s field and advocated for women’s rights and women’s interests in engineering and science. Her courage, pragmatism, and commitment inspire me on a regular basis, and have motivated me to launch aspirational projects like HERricane Arlington. She asserted ownership over her future and made her own success- which is empowering women of all ages.”

Ready Arlington Eleanor Roosevelt, (photo via Wikimedia Commons)Samantha Brann – Deputy Coordinator

Eleanor Roosevelt “She overcame incredible personal challenges to find fulfillment in public life serving those without a voice. She was outspoken: holding press conferences, writing a daily newspaper article, hosting a radio show, and even disagreeing publicly with her husband, the President, when she felt morally obligated.

She advocated for women’s rights, civil rights, and the rights of WWII refugees. She reminds me that when I face adversity — when the couch, a pint of ice cream and Netflix is screaming my name — that’s when we can dig deep and achieve the most.”

Photos (1, 2, 3, 4) via Wikimedia Commons

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — February 16, 2017 at 1:15 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Ready Arlington, A Novel CatastropheIt’s that time of year when we like to curl up with a mug of cocoa and a good book. Of course, our staff favorites feature stories of emergencies, disasters, and survival against the odds.

See what our staff is reading, and join us in a discussion at A Novel Catastrophe, our bi-monthly book club.

Ready Arlington, WaveWave, Sonali Deraniyagala (Tuesday, March 14) – In 2004, at a beach resort on the coast of Sri Lanka, Sonali and her family — parents, husband, sons — were swept away by a tsunami.

Only Sonali survived to tell their tale. This is her account of the nearly incomprehensible event and its aftermath.

  • Why we read it: We put a lot of effort into planning for, and responding to, emergencies. This raw and honest depiction is a reminder that the disaster isn’t over when the Emergency Operations Center closes.
  • Register

Ready Arlington, Flight 232Flight 232, Laurence Gonzales (Tuesday, May 9) – As hundreds of rescue workers waited on the ground, United Airlines Flight 232 wallowed drunkenly over the bluffs northwest of Sioux City. The plane slammed onto the runway and burst into a vast fireball. The rescuers didn’t move at first: nobody could possibly survive that crash.

And then people began emerging from the summer corn that lined the runways. Miraculously, 184 of 296 passengers lived.

  • Why we read it: This is a story of miracles, heroes, sacrifice and survival. Need we say more?
  • Register

Ready Arlington, Life As We Knew ItLife As We Knew It (Tuesday, July 11) – High school sophomore Miranda’s disbelief turns to fear in a split second when an asteroid knocks the moon closer to Earth, like “one marble hits another.”

The result is catastrophic. How can her family prepare for the future when worldwide tsunamis are wiping out the coasts, earthquakes are rocking the continents, and volcanic ash is blocking out the sun?

  • Why we read it: Sure, it’s a little apocalyptic, but this fun, fast read really makes you think about your own survival skills in the worst of conditions.
  • Register

Ready Arlington, five days at memorial_LGFive Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, Sheri Fink (September 12) After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients for rescue.

Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths.

  • Why we read it: We say over and over again: make a plan. This book brings us into the worst-case-scenario, when plans fail, or don’t exist, and staff are forced to make difficult decisions.   
  • Register

According to Amanda Ripley, author of The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes and Why (one of our all-time favorites), there are three common characteristics of disaster survivors:

  • A belief you can influence what happens to you
  • Ability to find meaningful purpose in life’s struggles
  • Ability to learn from all experiences- good and bad

Join our conversation: Do the survivors in these books share these characteristics? How would you respond in their shoes?

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — February 2, 2017 at 2:45 pm 0

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This biweekly column is sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management. The author of this post, Lauren Stienstra, is the Senior Manager for Research and Policy Development in the Arlington County Office of Emergency Management.


I took my first CPR class when I was 12. I was preparing to be a babysitter. I had taken classes, watched my neighbor’s kids, and was ready to finish my “résumé” and make some spending money. I loved it. In class, I liked learning how the body worked (and failed) and loved the idea that I could help save lives.

My stint in babysitting was brief — not because I was bored or particularly bad at it — but because it evolved into a summer job as a lifeguard, then a college job as an EMT, and eventually a career as an emergency manager here in Arlington. “Emergency Manager” was not my dream job as a 12-year-old, but the early exposure to the ideas and skills around emergencies started me down a path that would lead me to an incredibly fulfilling role and career in this community.

Website SliderThis was part of the motivation for launching a career development program that we’re calling “HERricane Arlington.” Not many women consider careers in public safety and we’re hoping to close some of those gaps. HERricane Arlington provides young women (ages 13-17) a chance to explore emergency management and allied fields through exciting activities and exercises. We’re trying to grow and support tomorrow’s public health nurses, meteorologists, and journalists to ensure that the future has a team that can handle hurricanes, derechos, and outbreaks.

So, if you know a girl who has ever wanted to learn how to use a fire extinguisher, wondered what to do after a tornado, or dreamed of being the journalist who reports the next big disaster, this could be the program they remember for the rest of their lives!

herricane-stats_924_904961afdd6caf019bbb24173061103f604c20c6Why HERricane Arlington?

  • Representation: Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in emergency management across the nation. They occupy 34% of staff-level positions and even fewer director-level ones.
  • Employment: Public safety jobs in Virginia grew 15% over the past decade and are expected to keep growing (13% by 2020!) making this a great career choice for many young women.
  • Empowerment: According to the United Nations Development Programme women are more likely to be victims of disaster, especially in regards to death, sexual violence, and loss of income. Equipping girls with disaster response skills will empower them to be able to help themselves and their communities after major incidents.

What is it, exactly?

HERricane Arlington is more than a weeklong camp, it’s a community. Graduates will be encouraged to continue to develop their skills through post-camp programming and mentoring throughout the following year.

Summer Camp: A jam-packed, week-long program exploring disaster response and leadership skills, including.

  • CPR
  • Storm spotting
  • Fire extinguisher training

The Aftermath: A series of monthly activities so graduates can continue to develop in the field of emergency management. Attend our activities, earn points, win prizes! Activities include:

  • Ropes course
  • Movie watch parties
  • 24 hours of community service alongside EM professionals

Mentorship and Early Career Support: Graduates of HERricane Arlington will be offered mentorship as well as internship and volunteer opportunities to launch them into meaningful careers.

Join the Storm!

For more information and to apply, go to: ReadyArlington.com

HERricane Arlington SponsorsPartnerships

This program is supported by a number of partners, including the American Red Cross as well as Arlington Public Schools. We’re also fortunate to be funded by many community donors.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — January 19, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is written and sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

911 Ready Arlington9-1-1, Where is your emergency? If your answer to this question is “this isn’t an emergency,” then you’ve dialed the wrong number. Arlington County has a non-emergency number that’s also answered 24/7 by call-takers in the Emergency Communications Center. Still not sure when it’s appropriate to use the non-emergency number?

  • Is the situation life threatening? Is something on fire? Is someone bleeding? Not breathing? Is there a weapon? If you find yourself in a situation where someone needs medical attention, there’s any type of fire, smoke, smell or someone has a weapon or is threatening you, you should absolutely call 9-1-1. For any situation when there is an immediate threat to life, health or property, do not wait — call 9-1-1 immediately.

Non Emergency Number Ready ArlingtonPRO TIP: The most important piece of information you can give is your location. Give this information first. If you don’t know
the exact address, pay special attention to your surroundings. Just saying, “I’m at the 7-11,” isn’t helpful (there are seventeen 7-11’s in Arlington). But if you say, “I’m at the 7-11 near Columbia Pike and South George Mason,” then dispatchers can figure out where you are. Keep in mind, your cell phone will not automatically tell dispatchers where you are.

  • Online Reporting Ready ArlingtonDid the event happen more than 30 minutes ago? The possibilities of when the non-emergency number should be used are really limitless, but one of the biggest factors is time. If the danger still exists, call 9-1-1. However, if there has been an incident where you needed the police but the danger has already passed, then the non-emergency number would be appropriate. Some examples: if you saw a strange car in your neighborhood an hour ago, if you left your wallet in a cab last night, if you just noticed something was stolen from your car in the last week — then call the non-emergency line!

Other times it’s appropriate to use the non-emergency number is for nuisance calls. A barking dog or an illegally parked car are things that are annoying (and violate certain ordinances), but are not life threatening. If you cannot find your car, that is not necessarily an emergency. If you saw someone physically steal it then yes, call 9-1-1 immediately. Otherwise you can find out if it’s been towed or file a stolen vehicle report through the non-emergency number.

PRO TIP: The Arlington County Police has a great system in place for making online reports. Once the report is submitted, you will automatically receive a temporary case number. You will then receive an e-mail from an officer within 48 hours to follow up. If further information is needed, the Officer will ask for it via e-mail.

See Something, Say Something Ready ArlingtonPRO TIP: Arlington County also has an online tool for reporting things like littering, traffic signal issues and damaged signs.

  • See Something, Say Something. The community plays a critical part as our eyes and ears for suspicious activity. However, just because something is suspicious doesn’t mean it’s an emergency. If you see someone taking unusual pictures or videos, or behaving strangely, call the non-emergency number. If what you are seeing feels like it might be an imminent danger, call 9-1-1.
  • Just because you call the non-emergency line, doesn’t mean it’s not important. A call for a non-emergency situation may take a little longer than an emergency. However, this does not mean your incident isn’t important, or won’t be handled properly. Just have a question for a call-taker? Call the non-emergency number.

PRO TIP: Arlington County also has Text-to-9-1-1 capabilities for times when it’s an emergency, but you are unable to speak on the phone.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — January 5, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is written and sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Elizabeth Dexter is a Watch Officer, for the Office of Emergency Management in Arlington.

Life Happens. Life is messy. — In 2007, my trip into work took four hours. It normally takes 45 minutes. I left the house while it was raining, but it quickly turned into snow. I remember being angry and stressed that I was going to be late for work. Almost everyone has a similar story, whether it was the Angry Inch or Snowzilla (in 2016), or Snowmageddon (in 2014). After each of these events, people often ask, “How can I stay informed about things like this? How can I avoid these emergencies?”

Wireless Emergency AlertsCan You Reach Me Now? — As technology continues to improve, so do our options for being notified about emergencies where we work, live and play. In the past, people had to wait for a radio broadcast, the 11 o’clock news or newspaper to find out if an emergency was happening in their area. Now people have access to several notification methods:

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) — Ever been startled by a blaring siren on your phone? It was probably a WEA. These alerts are sent out to all cell phones inside a designated area. These messages only happen in rare situations:

  • Alerts issued by the President of the United States
  • AMBER Alerts
  • Alerts involving the immediate threat to lifeArlington Alert

Arlington Alert — If you’ve heard us say it once, you’ve probably heard us say it 1,000 times: Arlington Alert is a free service that provides you information when major traffic events, mass transit issues and other emergencies occur in Arlington. It also issues weather alerts from the Weather Service. These alerts can be set up to go to cell phones, pagers or even an email address! In certain situations, they can even call a phone and deliver a message by voice.

Emergency Subscriber Listings (you may have heard this also referred to as “Reverse 9-1-1) — A system that uses landline listed and unlisted telephone numbers to call the home or business and relay critical information. Here in the county, this has been used to tell individuals about police activity in an area, and also to ask for assistance in looking for a missing child.

Facebook Safety CheckFacebook Safety Check — If you happened to be in an area where a major crisis has happened, they will allow you to mark yourself safe and let you see which of your friends who are also in the area have also checked in. On the same page, you can also get basic information about the crisis (location, date, what happened and who to call for assistance).

Social Media — It’s fast, it’s crowdsourced and it can be accurate — but not always. Many people have turned to social sources like Facebook and Twitter for information about what’s going on around their neighborhoods. The quantity and quality of information can be mixed, so don’t forget to check verified, official sources as well. For instance, on December 13th, residents had questions about sirens they heard in South Arlington on I-395. Many people took to Facebook and Twitter to ask questions and share what they knew or had seen. Someone tweeted at the Arlington County Police Department and ACPD responded with an official explanation of what was going on — even before the story broke here on ARLnow!

It’s not just Social Media — In the moments after the Paris Terror attacks businesses, such as Airbnb and Uber, reached out to their customers to let them know what had happened and actions they should take.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — December 22, 2016 at 2:30 pm 0

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Samantha Brann is the Deputy Coordinator, Volunteer Management, for the Arlington County Office of Emergency Management.Ready Arlington volunteers

I tell people I that fell into the field of emergency management. Three weeks after Hurricane Katrina ravaged Biloxi, MS, I took a break from graduate school to assist in the response efforts. Three weeks later, I was asked to stay as the Volunteer Coordinator; three weeks turned into three months, and then a year. Even today, I’m surprised by how much my time volunteering following Hurricane Katrina has affected my life and my career.

Volunteering Makes Your Life Better!

It’s no secret that volunteering provides just as many benefits to the volunteer as to the organization served. But did you know that volunteering:

  • Improves your health — A UnitedHealth Group study reported that volunteering reduced stress in 78% of volunteers, as well as improved the moods in 94%. Volunteers also have lower rates of depression.
  • Can land you a job — A LinkedIn survey found that 41% of employers considered volunteer work equally important as paid work when evaluating a candidate, while 20% reported they actually selected a candidate based on volunteer work.
  • Makes you live longer — Volunteers have a 20% reduction in mortality compared to non-volunteers according to researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School.
  • Increases life satisfaction — According to a UnitedHealth Group study, 96% of people said volunteering enriched their sense of purpose in life.
  • Makes you feel like you have more time — Those who give their time (or money), feel like they have more of it, according to a study in the Harvard Business Review.

New Year, New Opportunity

Residents of Arlington are well versed in volunteering — 33% of residents in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria area volunteered in 2015, ranking them the 4th highest among the 51 largest metropolitan statistical areas in the country. So tell me, how do you volunteer? And while you’re thinking, let me offer you an opportunity.Arlington Network for Community Readiness ANCHOR

Arlington Network for Community Readiness (ANChoR) is the new volunteer program of the Office of Emergency Management with a mission to support OEM in educating and assisting Arlington for emergencies. Volunteers are community members over the age of 16 who live or work in Arlington County and want to help their community during an emergency.

ANChoR volunteers may be called upon to staff outreach tables at fairs or lead preparedness workshops. They may be asked to provide critical support during an emergency, such as providing support in the Emergency Operations Center. When events like Winter Storm Jonas roll in, they’ll be tasked with checking on (or shoveling out!) ill patients for life-saving medical appointments.

ANChoR volunteers can learn new skills through trainings, investigate new professional opportunities through networking activities, connect with their community through service projects, help neighbors during an emergency or simply meet new people!

Give Yourself the Gift of Volunteering in 2017!

I drove down to Biloxi, MS after Hurricane Katrina simply to help in any way I could. Over 12 months, I gained skills I never anticipated: roofing, dry walling, mold remediation — even how to use a chain saw properly. I also learned coalition building, fundraising and leadership — skills that allowed me to return home and find a new profession in the world of emergency and volunteer management.

Give yourself the gift of more time, better health, longer life, less stress, higher quality of life, and new opportunities: help your community during an emergency. Sign up for Arlington Network for Community Readiness today, and volunteer in 2017!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — December 8, 2016 at 2:50 pm 0

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This biweekly column is written and sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

Snow in ArlingtonThe cold has finally arrived, and with it the possibility of winter weather. Whether you’re doing the snow dance or not, now’s the time to make sure you’re ready for winter! Take these five simple steps to prepare for today and every day.

Give Your Car a Prep Check — Every year over 480,000 people are injured and more than 6,000 people are killed in weather-related crashes. Make sure your car is in prime working order before you hit the road in less-than-perfect conditions.

  • Check your antifreeze, oil, brakes, heater & defroster, windshield wipers & fluid, battery, and tires for proper levels and good working order.
  • Go through supplies you have stored in your car to make sure your food, water, radio, phone charger, first aid kit, kitty litter/sand, shovel, ice scraper, and blanket are still there, and in good working order. Add supplies if you’re low on anything. For a list of basic car supplies, see Ready.gov.
  • Make sure to keep your gas tank at least half full (a good practice year-round, but particularly important in the winter). If you’re surprised by weather, and end up stranded on the road, a full tank of gas will provide you with hours of heat!

Emergency KitCheck Your Stocks — Not those stocks; your preparedness stocks! Last winter following Winter Storm Jonas, residents across the region found themselves in their homes for days. Grocery stores and restaurants had difficulties restocking and serving customers. This serves as a reminder that we all need to have at least a few days of food and supplies in our homes at all times.

  • Case your pantry or emergency kit, and verify that you have at least 3 days of food and water for your entire Discard and replace any food that has expired.
  • Check your flashlights, radios, batteries and anything else with an on/off switch in your supplies to make sure they work and that the batteries are good.
  • Do a full assessment of additional supplies you may need, and verify they are easily assessable for your entire family. A basic list of emergency supplies is available at Ready.gov.

Be Aware & Prepared — Most weather-related car accidents happen when the roads are wet or slippery from rain, snow or ice. Be aware and prepared for the conditions.

  • Slow down and give yourself plenty of space when the roads are wet. If the temperature is near freezing, you may be driving on ice without realizing it.
  • Weather can change rapidly- it’s important to know what you’ll be heading out into before you go. Register for ArlingtonAlert.com to receive National Weather Service warnings, as well as traffic and emergency alerts.
  • Stay off the roads during snow and ice events. Not only do you put yourself at risk by taking to the roads, you also slow the clean-up efforts.

Talk the Talk — Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, over 5,000 children were separated from their families for as long as 6 months. Family communication plans are a critical component to help you and your family find one another after an emergency.

  • Review your communication plan to make sure the information, such as your contacts (i.e. out-of-town contact, doctors, caregivers, etc.), meeting areas, locations (school, work, home), insurance, evacuation routes, etc. are still correct. Go to ReadyNOVA.org to develop a family communication plan that can be printed, sent and saved to mobile devices.
  • Review the plan with your entire family and make sure everyone knows what to do and who to call if they are separated from you.

Get Involved — Help your community during an emergency.

  • Get to know your neighbors, and find out if any may need help after a winter storm, and then offer to help if you’re able to!
  • Join the Arlington Network for Community Readiness, a volunteer group who supports the Office of Emergency Management in educating and assisting Arlington for emergencies.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — November 25, 2016 at 12:00 pm 0

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This biweekly column is written and sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

What says “I care” more than fun gadgets and games that’ll help loved ones during an emergency?! Just in time for the kick-off of holiday shopping, we put together a list of some of our favorite preparedness items everyone on your holiday shopping list will appreciate!

For the Outdoor Enthusiast: Many preparedness items can serve double-duty for the outdoor enthusiast, and you don’t have to drop a lot of dough to get some quality items. Consider:Ready Arlington cell phone charger

  • Water filtration system: From tablets to personal filtration straws, there’s a huge variety to fit the needs of the hiker in your life.
  • Camp stove: These small, packable stoves can be either alcohol, or wood burning (or a combination of both). Just remember to always use them outside!
  • Multi Tool: With combinations of every tool but the kitchen sink, multi tools can help you saw down small trees, tighten screws, cut up your meals and open bottles.
  • Lights: From headlights to lanterns, your outdoor enthusiast will appreciate more (lights have a habit of walking away). Look for fun lights that are hands free and can be used hiking, camping or in the house when the power’s out!

For the Gadget Geek: Searching for an item for the techie in your life? Try one of these gift ideas:Ready Arlington radio

  • Emergency phone charger: Today’s selection in phone chargers is huge. From a quick “pocket juice” to solar chargers, chargers are varied and priced for everyone.
  • Encrypted thumb drive: Encryption allows the safe storage of personal information that your tech-savvy friend will appreciate.
  • Weather radio: The weather radio deserves some new attention. With features like hand-crank and self-power, combined with Bluetooth technology, flashlights and solar charging, weather radios could be a surprise hit!

For the Commuter: Traffic and Metro delays. Rainy and snowy walk/bicycle commutes. Looking for a unique gift to ease the pain of commuting? Check out these fantastic preparedness items!

  • Hand warmers: The walker, biker or driver will appreciate these on a cold day. Perfect for the car emergency kit, they’re light and easy to pack into a commuting bag, purse or backpack.Ready Arlington whistle
  • Whistle: While more manufactures have incorporated whistles into the straps of backpacks, these are always great items to have on hand in your car emergency kit, or as a pedestrian.
  • Emergency hammer: For the driver in your life, these allow users to break the windows of cars, even when submerged under water.
  • Dry sacks: Available in an array of sizes from wallet to duffle bag, dry sacks keep the contents completely dry inside, even when dumped in water (they float too!).

For the Novelist: Have an avid reader in your life? Consider a book that’ll help them survive in the event of a disaster. Some of our favorites include:

  • SAS Survival Handbook: A basic handbook on survival skills, including weather, building shelters, finding food, first aid and more.
  • The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes — and Why: Award-winning journalist Amanda Ripley traces the responses of people through multiple disasters, including the World Trade Center during 9/11 and the Air Florida Flight 90 that crashed into the Potomac River, to determine how and why humans behave during a disaster and how we can improve our chances for survival.

Looking for more preparedness gift ideas? Follow ReadyArlington on Facebook/Twitter. We’ll be posting our staff’s favorite preparedness gift ideas throughout the month of December!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — November 10, 2016 at 2:30 pm 0

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This biweekly column is written and sponsored by the Arlington Office of Emergency Management.

A message with a cause

slide4This month, helping some of Arlington’s most important causes just got a lot easier. To kick off the “Season of Giving,” the Office of Emergency Management has launched a special “Subscribe and Serve” campaign. This month, when you register for Arlington Alert using the new “EZ” form, you can choose to support one of four local causes, and we’ll make a donation on your behalf. If you want to fight hunger, you can donate a can of food to the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC). If you’re interested in helping to end homelessness, you can direct a pair of socks to the Arlington Street People’s Assistance Network (A-SPAN). Are animals your thing (and in Arlington, we know they are)? Then a can of pet food for the Animal Welfare League of Arlington (AWLA). Finally, if you’d like to help develop the next Picasso, you can donate art supplies to Arlington Public Schools (APS).

A stronger community = a more resilient communityAFAC Feeding our Neighbors in need

In emergency management, we know that it takes a “whole community” to truly make emergency preparedness work. AFAC, AWLA, A-SPAN and APS are some of our essential community partners for responding to and recovering from disasters. Let’s take a look at how their work creates a resilience for Arlington:

  • Arlington Food Assistance Center: Not only does AFAC assist in providing critical nutrition for thousands of people in Arlington, they are also excellent logisticians. They know how to acquire, process and distribute food to large numbers of aspanpeople — a critical skill for serving those who might be impacted by disaster.
  • Arlington Street People’s Assistance Network: The homeless population is one of the most vulnerable — both during and after an emergency. By ensuring that these people’s basic needs are met, A-SPAN helps ensure that they don’t need to consume additional resources during an incident.aps
  • Arlington Public Schools: Children are another vulnerable population, and APS helps ensure that they are supported in all aspects of their life. During emergencies, APS provides critical facilities — like gymnasiums and cafeterias — with generators in case we need to establish emergency shelters. Crayons are also an important part of an emergency kit for anyone with kids — easy, battery-free entertainment!animal_welfare_league_of_arlington_color_rgb
  • Animal Welfare League of Arlington: You’ve heard us harp on it before, but pet preparedness is an important part of individual preparedness. After Hurricane Katrina, we learned that 44% of people did not evacuate for the storm because they refused to leave the pets behind. AWLA provides important services like microchipping (which aids in pet-family reunification after a disaster), as well as affordable vaccinations (which are a requirement in most emergency pet shelters). AWLA is the County’s main partner for opening and operating these shelters.

arlignton-community-fcu-logoThese organizations are an important part of our community both before and after emergencies. Another important partner is the Arlington Community Federal Credit Union. They helped sponsor this campaign because they know how important partnership strengthens the community. Additionally, they provide financial services that are an essential part of emergency planning. Don’t forget to think about banking, lines of credit, and insurance as part of your own personal preparedness plan.

Strength through partnership

Overall, communities that are strong before a disaster are typically strong after a disaster. Government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses and the partnerships between them create the network that creates that strength. Don’t forget that individuals are part of this coalition too- and don’t forget to subscribe and serve!

 

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