Arlington, VA

A moving truck has tipped onto its side while rounding a corner on a ramp to I-66.

The crash happened just after 4 p.m., reportedly on the ramp from northbound Route 110 to westbound I-66, near Rosslyn and the Roosevelt Bridge. Initial reports suggest that the driver, who was the only occupant of the vehicle at the time, suffered only minor injuries.

As of 4:15 p.m. traffic on the ramp was still flowing past the overturned truck and there were otherwise no traffic impacts. Normally busy outbound rush hour traffic on I-66 has been reduced to a trickle as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

A temporary closure of the ramp might be necessary to drag the truck back onto its wheels, however.

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A rental box truck ran off the side of Old Dominion Drive this afternoon, damaging a bench, a sign and a fence.

The crash happened shortly after 4 p.m., just west of the intersection of Old Dominion Drive and Williamsburg Blvd, in the Rock Spring neighborhood.

Traffic camera images show a yellow Penske rental truck on the sidewalk and a Metro bus stop sign on the ground. A black metal bench was also reportedly smashed, along with a fence and a tree in the yard adjacent to the sidewalk.

It’s not clear how the crash happened, nor whether any other vehicles were involved. No injuries have been reported. Police are on scene.

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Delivery trucks are a frequent topic of complaints from Arlington residents.

Aside from double parking issues, they’re noisy and polluting. When you live near a truck loading dock, you often dread early morning deliveries and the “beep beep beep” of a truck going in reverse. The county often requires that new developments limit loading dock hours, as a condition of approval.

But what if the noisy idling, shrill beeps and diesel fumes could be a thing of the past? That is a future that Arlington County Board member Erik Gutshall is seeking to hasten.

Electric trucks, which are poised to become an increasingly common sight on the roads over the course of the decade, are the solution to many of the current delivery truck complains. Gutshall says Arlington County should take proactive measure to encourage their adoption — “some extra oomph,” as he puts it.

Cautioning that “the idea is very conceptual at this point,” Gutshall said the general idea would be to give electric delivery trucks special privileges, via development site plans and other regulatory means, for things like longer loading dock hours and designated curbside loading spaces on public roads.

Rewarding electric truck owners, instead of punishing fossil fuel truck owners, should “stay within a legally defensible framework” when it comes to the Dillon Rule in Virginia, he said. And if it doesn’t, the now-Democratic controlled state legislature could also carve out permission for localities to pass such ordinances.

“Update the regulations to accommodate the reality of modern life,” he said.

Gutshall plans to raise the idea, which he tweeted about last month, with his colleagues on the County Board in the near future — perhaps during an upcoming discussion on curbside management. Should it prove politically feasible, the next steps would include a public engagement process and legal review.

Electric trucks will come with the added benefit of helping Arlington achieve some of its Community Energy Plan goals.

“This is not just an Arlington issue,” Gutshall told ARLnow. “There are lots of other communities developing climate action plans and everyone knows that vehicle emissions are a huge part of the overall emission profile.”

“Any boost we can give to push early adopters out of the nest,” Gutshall said, will “help get other jurisdictions to do the same.”

Photo via Tesla

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(Updated at 4:40 p.m.) A dump truck overturned on N. Glebe Road, right before Chain Bridge, completely blocking the road to and from the bridge.

The driver was reported to be “severely trapped” in the truck’s cab, prompting a large fire department rescue response, according to scanner traffic. Multiple ambulances were dispatched to the scene, though it’s unclear if anyone else was injured.

The crash also spilled the truck’s load of cinder blocks and construction debris over the roadway. A heavy wrecker was requested to respond to the scene to assist with the cleanup.

The truck crashed after a steep and winding section of Glebe Road, which leads to a traffic signal at the intersection with Chain Bridge Road, just prior to the bridge.

Chain Bridge was expected to remain closed between D.C. and Virginia, and northbound Glebe Road is expected to remain blocked at N. Military Road, for an extended period of time — likely for “several hours.” Heavy traffic was reported on Chain Bridge Road approaching the crash scene this afternoon, with backups starting to extend into Fairfax County.

“Expect major delays as rescue work continues,” advised the Arlington County Fire Department. “Seek an alternate route.”

“Disruptions are anticipated into the evening commute,” Arlington County said via Twitter.

After an extended rescue operation, the trapped driver was removed from the truck just prior to 1 p.m. Glebe reopened to traffic between Chain Bridge Road and Military Road around 2 p.m. Chain Bridge reopened around 4:30 p.m., according to scanner traffic, though for now traffic heading from D.C. must turn on to Chain Bridge Road.

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A large truck carrying gravel overturned just north of Marymount University this afternoon.

The incident happened around 12:30 p.m. at the intersection of N. Abingdon Street and 34th Steet N. It’s unclear what led to the accident, which resulted in the truck tipping over onto its side, partially on the front yard of a house. It appears that the truck trailer was in the dumping position when it overturned — a load of gravel could be seen on the street behind it.

The driver of the truck was evaluated at the scene by paramedics for back pain. Two heavy duty tow trucks were called in to try to upright the truck and haul it away.

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A man is lucky to be alive after a dump truck ran over his head in the Ballston area over the weekend.

The incident happened around 2:15 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 24. According to police, the cyclist was stopped at a temporary red light next to a construction site on Quincy Street near Wilson Boulevard, when an unoccupied dump truck started rolling south on Quincy and struck him.

The man was knocked to the ground and one of the truck’s tires ran over his head, said Arlington County Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck. The man was wearing a helmet at the time and the helmet likely saved his life. He was taken to Inova Fairfax Hospital’s trauma center with non-life-threatening injuries, Sternbeck said.

Immediately after the incident the driver of the dump truck, who had left it running and unattended next to the construction site, ran it down and managed to stop it from rolling further, according to Sternbeck. Occupational safety officials responded to the scene, inspected the truck and found multiple safety violations, he said.

Citations were issued and the truck was “taken out of service.” No word on whether any other charges are pending.

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A fully-loaded dump truck came to a grinding halt at the intersection of N. Glebe Road and Randolph Street this morning after its left front wheel detached from the axle.

Nobody was hurt, but the accident did block Randolph Street for at least a half hour, as a heavy wrecker truck was brought in to move the disabled dump truck. A large gash was visible in the pavement, showing where the truck started grinding into the street after the wheel fell off.

The incident happened as the truck was turning from northbound Glebe onto Randolph, across from the Harris Teeter and the Ballston mall parking garage.

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Is your kid fascinated by trucks? Does he or she love seeing big machinery up close? Does the photo (left) of a Washington Gas truck provoke feelings of awe and wonder?

If so, indulge the kid’s obsession at Arlington Central Library’s “truck petting zoo.”

From 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, various types of work vehicles will be on display at the library’s (1015 N. Quincy Street) east parking lot, near the tennis courts. Kids of all ages are invited to touch and explore the vehicles up close.

According to the Arlington Transit Blog, the trucks scheduled to be on display include:

  • ACFD fire engine, ladder truck and ambulance
  • ACPD motorcycle and police cruiser
  • Street sweeper, garbage truck and dump truck from the Arlington’s Dept. of Environmental Services
  • Concrete mixer from Vulcan Materials
  • Gas operations vehicle from Washington Gas
  • Arlington Transit ART bus
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A number of people have been wondering: where do those dump trucks — the ones filled with snow scooped up off Wilson Blvd., Clarendon Blvd., Crystal Dr., and other main roads — go after they’ve been filled up? And what happens to all that snow? Now we have an answer.

It turns out the trucks (which have been operating since Friday night) actually are dumping the snow in several parks, parking lots and other county-owned locations, including:

  • A site on S. Clark St (just off of Old Jefferson Davis Highway)
  • The future Long Bridge Park (also off of Old Jefferson Davis Highway)
  • The Virginia Highlands park parking lot (off of S. Hayes St., near Pentagon City mall)
  • Barcroft #6 parking lot (off of 4 Mile Run Dr. near George Mason Drive)

Over the next few weeks, the Department of Environmental Services will try to clear the huge snow piles using a mechanical snow melter, according to spokesperson Myllisa Kennedy. The department is also hoping that mother nature will pitch in with some sunshine and warmer weather.

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