by ARLnow.com September 28, 2017 at 10:05 am 0

Arlington is the second-best “city” in the nation for recent college graduates, according to the website NerdWallet.

Arlington County received high marks for “the environment offered for recent college graduates looking to get a foothold in the working world,” which factors in “jobs, age of the population, rent costs, median earnings and unemployment.”

Arlington was second only to Madison, Wisconsin, and ahead of Seattle, Minneapolis and Boston, which ranked No. 3-5.

Here’s what NerdWallet wrote about Arlington:

Just over the Potomac River from the nation’s capital, Arlington is part of the densely populated region known as Northern Virginia, or NOVA. Rents are the highest among the top 10 — a median of $1,844 a month — and third-highest in our analysis. That the median income is $75,025 doesn’t quite offset the cost of living: Arlington’s young professionals still pour about 30% of their income into rent. Where it thrives is the percentage of workers in high-paying management, business, science and arts occupations (topping our list at 68%), likely due to the large technology, government contracting and finance employers in the region.

“With employers reporting plans to hire 5% more graduates in 2017 than in 2016, it appears the employment outlook for recent graduates is on the upswing,” said a NerdWallet PR rep. “That’s good news for the city [sic] of Arlington.”

by Katherine Berko August 4, 2017 at 10:10 am 0

The annual “Late Night Recess” event is hitting the Arlington Central Library once again. This summer, it is set for Thursday, August 10, from 9-11:30 p.m.

Locals aged 20 to 39 are encouraged to attend, where they can mingle and make new friends at the library at 1015 N. Quincy Street. However, unlike previous years, the event is not limited to this age group and all adults are welcome.

“Bring your friends and your inner child for an evening of fun and games at Central Library,” the event’s web page says. “Play clothes, including sneakers or athletic shoes, are highly recommended.”

This year’s activities are likely to be remembered by many from their childhood, and include Twister, Nerf Tag, slime, face painting, hula hoops and jump rope. There will also be cookies, milk and smoothies to keep everyone’s energy levels up.

The event will begin in the library’s auditorium, but will eventually include most public areas in the building. Guests will also be able to check out books and sign up for a library card if they bring identification and proof of address.

by ARLnow.com December 20, 2016 at 1:00 pm 0

We reported earlier this month that Punch Bowl Social was coming to Arlington. Now we know where it’s coming to: the renovated Ballston Quarter mall.

Punch Bowl Social says it will be opening a 25,000 square foot space at the mall in June 2018.

“Already a hit in other cities and a proven millennial magnet, Punch Bowl Social Ballston will include eight bowling lanes, one bocce court, three private karaoke rooms, a custom built 360 degree bar and various lounging and gathering spots — for groups both large and small — housed in an eclectic space melding mountain lodge, Victorian and modern industrial design themes,” the company said in a press release.

The full press release is below.

Punch Bowl Social, the leader in the “eatertainment” movement, announced today that it will open a 25,000 square-foot restaurant, bar and entertainment concept in Arlington’s Ballston Quarter in June 2018. Punch Bowl Social pairs a Hugh Acheson designed, scratch-made menu and craft beverage program with “old-school” social activities like vintage video games, shuffleboard, private karaoke rooms, bowling, Ping-Pong, bocce and skee-ball.

Already a hit in other cities and a proven millennial magnet, Punch Bowl Social Ballston will include eight bowling lanes, one bocce court, three private karaoke rooms, a custom built 360 degree bar and various lounging and gathering spots – for groups both large and small – housed in an eclectic space melding mountain lodge, Victorian and modern industrial design themes.

Punch Bowl Social founder & CEO Robert Thompson noted that Ballston Quarter is exactly the type of development where Punch Bowl Social flourishes. “The Ballston Quarter is poised to become the urban village for Arlington and the surrounding metro area,” he said. “The team behind the project is curating a unique, elevated experience that emphasizes attention to detail and quality offerings. These are the same considerations that drive Punch Bowl Social.”

The elevated experiences that Thompson references are what have ensured Punch Bowl Social’s singular position atop the “eatertainment” industry’s leadership roster. As noted in a multi-page spread in Inc. Magazine’s December/January issue, Punch Bowl Social has “broken from the pack.” The article pays homage to the brand and to Thompson’s uncanny – one could argue unparalleled – ability to market to the often elusive millennial, now the country’s largest demographic and a group sure to descend upon Ballston Quarter.

Joe Boehm, Executive Vice President, Real Estate at Forest City Realty Trust, the development company behind the Ballson Quarter, notes that it was these very factors that drew Forest City to Punch Bowl Social. “The Ballston Quarter will offer an experience that is purposeful, thoughtful and uncommon,” Boehm said. “We support this goal by partnering with anchor tenants capable of delivering on this promise. Punch Bowl Social is an industry leader with a proven track record. But more importantly, it offers an authentic experience that resonates across demographic groupings, literally offering something for everyone.”

Punch Bowl Social has made a name for itself with its remarkably balanced execution of the eat, drink, play concept. The brand prides itself on its food-forward approach, with an inspired menu created by the company’s culinary partner, celebrity chef Hugh Acheson. Acheson, a restauranteur, cookbook author, Top Chef judge and James Beard award winner, leads the ongoing culinary direction of the growing restaurant concept while underscoring its commitment to a seasonally inspired, scratch kitchen.

Punch Bowl Social Ballston marks the company’s first east coast location. Other cities include, among others, Detroit; Cleveland; Portland, Ore; Austin; and Denver, Colorado, where Punch Bowl Social originated.


Punch Bowl Social brings classic entertainment and real culinary chops together under the same roof, in an environment that is playful and surprisingly intimate. Punch Bowl Social’s scratch kitchen serves weekend brunch, lunch, dinner and late-night snacks while the in-house mixologists focus on serving up craft beverages. For more information, visit www.punchbowlsocial.com

by ARLnow.com December 2, 2016 at 11:40 am 0

(Updated on 12/6/16) Punch Bowl Social, a combination bar, restaurant, bowling alley and arcade targeted at the young professional set, is coming to Arlington.

The expanding chain, which has existing locations in Denver, Austin, Detroit, Portland, Cleveland and elsewhere, says on its website that it’s planning to open in Arlington in 2018. A D.C. location is also planned.

“Punch Bowl Social has eliminated having to choose between respectable food and beverage, and a great social experience,” says the Facebook page of one of the existing locations. “PBS brings ‘old school’ entertainment, culinary refinement and a modern beverage program under one roof.”

Founded by Robert Thompson, who previously operated Buffalo Billiards locations in Austin and Nashville, Punch Bowl Social offers a range of beers and cocktails — including, yes, cocktails served in communal punch bowls. PBS describes its dining and beverage offerings as “food for foodies, PBR tallboys, and craft beverages.”

Entertainment options include bowling, karaoke, shuffleboard, billiards, ping pong, fussball, billiards and vintage arcade games.

There’s no word yet as to where in Arlington Punch Bowl Social will be opening. “We don’t have any specific details to share,” a publicist told ARLnow.com.

Based on size, opportunity, timing and Metro accessibility, possible locations include the renovated Ballston Quarter mall, which will be reopening in 2018; a number of new and existing buildings in Rosslyn; and the still-developing and increasingly Millennial-oriented Crystal City and Pentagon City area.

Photos via Facebook

by Jackie Friedman June 22, 2016 at 1:15 pm 0

Arlington Central LibraryYoung adults can relive their childhood tomorrow night as Arlington Public Library is set to host its annual “Late Night Recess.”

The event from 9:15-11:30 p.m. Thursday is intended to help 20- to 39-year-old locals meet new people and explore the Arlington Central Library at 1015 N. Quincy Street.

Activities include Twister, Nerf tag, fort building and something to do with bubble wrap.

“Bring your friends and your inner child for an evening of fun and games,” the event’s page says. “Play clothes, including sneakers or athletic shoes, are highly recommended.”

Alcoholic beverages aren’t allowed, however. The recess is free, but online registration is required.

by ARLnow.com July 7, 2015 at 10:10 am 2,788 0

Arlington Central Library

Arlington Public Library is bringing back its “late night recess” for 20- and 30-somethings this summer.

The event lets young professionals have some retro fun, meet new people and discover everything else the library has to offer. This year, activities include Twister, Nerf tag, a dance party, building forts and something involving bubble wrap.

“Bring your friends and your inner child for an evening of fun and games at the Central Library,” the event’s web page says. “Play clothes are highly recommended, including sneakers or athletic shoes. This event is free, but registration is required. Please only register if you are between the ages of 20 and 39.”

The event is scheduled for Thursday, July 30, from 9-11:30 p.m. at Arlington Central Library (1015 N. Quincy Street).

Would-be participants can register online. As of this writing, 52 spots were still available.

Alcoholic beverages, it should be noted, are not allowed in the library.

by ARLnow.com December 17, 2014 at 10:45 am 2,345 0

Arlington County has been trying to figure out how to better reach out to the hordes of young apartment-dwellers who make up a significant portion of the county’s population, but who are usually nowhere to be found during community meetings.

“It’s not always easy to reach certain parts of the community,” Arlington Public Library Director Diane Kresh says in a new county-produced video (above). “We’ve tried several methods over the years — community meetings in schools, in community centers — and typically the same people would come out each time. So what we decided we needed to do was try something different.”

To help design events and services tailored to the elusive mid-20s to mid-30s professional set — dubbed “Metro Renters” — county staff is taking an approach called “Design Thinking,” which builds a needs profile through interviews with members of a given group.

“Design Thinking is a system of methods and processes that uses a designer’s sensibility to match people’s needs with what is feasible and viable,” explains Dept. of Environmental Services program manager Joan Kelsch.

Via interviews, the county developed the following profile of “Metro Renters.”

  • They want their resources to be quick and convenient and are willing to pay top dollar if it fulfills their needs in a hurry
  • They’re tech savvy and they can’t function without their mobile devices
  • They’re highly educated with varied reading interests
  • They listen to NPR on weekday mornings and track the news online all day
  • They work hard and play hard
  • Hanging out with friends is important
  • They like good food
  • Many don’t have cars so location is important
  • They enjoy a quiet, relaxing environment for conversation with a friend
  • Many are also interested in meeting potential life partners, so activities and places that give them something to do where they can meet new people with common interests are good
  • They consider themselves hard working and busy people without a lot of free time, so anything they attend should have an immediate impact on their lives or otherwise be important to them

If you have first-hand familiarity with the “Metro Renter” set, how would you grade the county’s job of producing a broadly accurate profile of the average 25-35 year old Metro corridor renter in Arlington?

by Ethan Rothstein September 2, 2014 at 11:05 am 2,953 0

View of Clarendon to Ballston from a commercial flight (Flickr pool photo by Ddimick)A new, county-funded study, polling young professionals who live and/or work in Arlington, found those who live in the county do so because of their job, not necessarily because of its amenities or social scene.

The study was conducted by the Southeastern Institute of Research on behalf of Arlington Economic Development, and polled 400 residents who identify as either Millennials or Generation X-ers. Of those polled, 139 live and work in Arlington, 137 live in Arlington and work elsewhere and 124 work in Arlington and commute from the surrounding area.

Of those who live and work in Arlington, 45 percent said they live in the county because of their job or because of “professional opportunities,” while 39 percent of those who live in Arlington and work elsewhere said they are in the county for professional reasons. “Location” was the second-most popular reason given to live in Arlington, followed by “friends/social scene.”

“Arlington County does not appear to be an area [young professionals] consider initially beyond a focus on a job opportunity,” the study’s authors, two AED interns, write. “It is not a place with YPs who have strong roots there or who are moving there for the people. With this being a strength, Arlington County should lead with jobs when promoting the area to YPs. During a time when it is hard for young people to find a job, this may prove a great strength for Arlington.”

Young professionals, despite moving to Arlington largely for work reasons, like living in the county, with 89 percent of people who live in the county calling it “a great place to live.” Eighty percent of respondents who live and work in the county also called it a “great place to live.”

“There is a great opportunity among those who only work in the County to showcase the reasons why Arlington is a great place to live,” the study says. “These respondents are not likely to recommend Arlington County as a place to live and when asked if they were to consider living in the County, only three in ten say they would. One of the goals moving forward should be to decrease these gaps.”

The top reason among those who work, but don’t live, in Arlington for living elsewhere was the cost of housing.

“I couldn’t even rent a spare bedroom for under $1500 in a decent neighborhood,” one respondent said. “Rent/housing is way too expensive.”

Flickr pool photo by Ddimick

by Morgan Fecto July 14, 2014 at 9:45 am 5,128 0

Arlington Central LibraryA new event, “Late Night Recess,” will give Arlington residents in their 20s and 30s a free opportunity to romp around Arlington Central Library (1015 N. Quincy Street) in “play clothes” after closing time later this month.

The event will take place on Thursday, July 31, starting at 9:00 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to “bring their friends and inner child” to the event, which will include Nerf tag, capture the flag, Twister and homemade cookies and milk from gourmet cookie bakery Noshy.

Following the event, participants can continue to O’Sullivan’s Irish Pub in Clarendon, where Late Night Recess ticket-holders will get a free appetizer with a $10 purchase. The event is intended to help the library engage with the young professional set.

“The library in the 21st century goes well beyond a stack of books on the shelves,” said library spokesman Peter Golkin. “If people are looking for something that’s built around a social gathering as opposed to a book-centered gathering, then that’s what we do.”

As one of the events in the Arlington Public Library’s “Lit Up” series, Late Night Recess is aimed at young adults who want to socialize and have fun in a unique setting. However, there is no age limit for the event. Attendees should use “common sense,” and respect the library in this unique after-hours setting, Golkin said.

Current, ongoing events in the Lit Up series include the Commuter Book Club, a book club for short books that make “Metro stops or miles fly by,” and Shut Up and Write, a discussion series with a panel of authors.

Registration for Late Night Recess is currently open, and the first 50 registrants will receive a “special prize.”

by ARLnow.com March 30, 2012 at 9:50 am 2,168 0

The Young Professionals fundraising branch of the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC) is holding their second annual “Hunger Is No Joke” benefit at Cafe Asia (1550 Wilson Blvd) in Rosslyn tonight.

Local party band Over the Line will perform at the event, which starts at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $35 for one or $60 for a pair. There will also be food and “plentiful” drinks, provided by Cafe Asia, and a raffle for signed Capitals pucks, D.C. United tickets, and gift cards to local restaurants, boutiques, salons and spas. All proceeds will benefit AFAC.

“This event promises to be our best of the year,” said Carrington Blencowe, chairwoman of the AFAC-Young Professionals Executive Committee. “Where else can you enjoy a night on the town while also helping your neighbors in need?”

AFAC provides groceries and other necessities to more than 1,600 families each week.


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