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County Emerges Victorious As State Gives Up HOT Lanes Plan

by ARLnow.com | February 3, 2011 at 5:01 am | 3,276 views | 110 Comments

(Updated at 10:35 a.m.) Arlington County has emerged victorious from its $1.5 million legal battle with the state over the plan to build High Occupancy Toll lanes on I-395.

Virginia Transportation Secretary Sean Connaughton announced today that the state is no longer pursuing its I-395 HOT lanes plan, which the county blocked by filing suit in 2009. VDOT is also canceling plans to upgrade the Shirlington and Eads Street interchanges.

Just hours before the project’s demise was first revealed by the Washington Post, County Board Chairman Chris Zimmerman sent a five-page letter to two top Virginia lawmakers further explaining Arlington’s effort to block the HOT lanes project.

Zimmerman questioned the wisdom of handing the state’s existing HOV lanes over to a foreign company for decades while getting what he described as relatively little in return. Zimmerman argued that the I-395 HOT lanes plan was poorly-designed, could exacerbate traffic congestion and could cause “great harm to the people that we and you represent in Northern Virginia.”

Addressing the lawsuit’s critics, Zimmerman wrote that “carrying on overheated diatribes through the news media is not conductive to conciliation.” He disputed the oft-repeated charge regarding the lawsuit’s insistence that minority populations would be adversely affected by HOT lanes, saying that “Arlington has never called anyone racist.”

Per the charge that Arlington was acting unscrupulously by suing two government officials in their personal capacity, Zimmerman noted that the officials “are of course provided legal representation through government general liability coverage.”

Even though Arlington’s HOT lanes fight is likely coming to a close, the lawsuit may continue to cost the county in the form of ill will in Richmond. As we previously reported, one Fairfax County lawmaker has effectively killed a bill that would renew Arlington’s hotel tax surcharge, which provides about $1 million per year for tourism promotion. Del. Tim Hugo (R) cited the costly HOT lanes suit as evidence that Arlington didn’t need the extra tax revenues.

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  • Greg

    I’m glad Arlington is going to win this, but Zimmerman misses the point with the comment that the officials “are of course provided legal representation through government general liability coverage.”

    The County sued two individuals as a legal tactic. The County should not be a party to “dirty-pool” strategies like this. Is the government also compensating these people for their time and the misery of being sued (which for many is one of the worst experiences of their lives)?

    I had assumed that suing the individuals was being pushed by the law firm and the County was just not managing things well. It’s disgusting to see a County Board member defend this act.

    • Jezebel

      The “dirty pool” strategies began with the Feds in the Bush administration when they gave the project a categorical exclusion from environmental review in the first place (during Bush’s lame duck status as well). No way in heck a project like this should get such categorical exclusion. They play hardball — the County plays hardball. Let’s not lose sight of how this started.

      • Greg

        You’re justifying Arlington’s actions because that’s how Bush does it? I think you need to take a step back and reconsider your line of reasoning…

        • BoredHouseWife

          Arlington had to play the politics game. Which is always nasty.

        • Jezebel

          Not justifying, explaining. Once a fight starts, you fight to win.

      • Wayne Kubicki

        In fairness, the Bush Administration granted the exclusion at the request of the Kaine Administration.

        • local

          That’s only “fairness” if you think everything is about partisan politics.

        • Jezebel

          That’s o.k., Kaine was dead to Arlington officials 2 years into his term (once it became clear they wouldn’t be joining his administration).

  • G

    Great news!

  • 4Arl

    We wake up… and it’s not Groundhog Day! Congrats to the county, but I hope they will never sue individuals outside their official capacity again.

  • Mark

    Great news.

  • Lacy Forest

    Great news. Arlington isn’t just something you have to get through to get to and from the District from Fairfax and points south.

    • jan

      +1

      • Bluemonter

        +1,000,000

    • Salvatore

      Actually, to those people, it is. You can have them do it efficiently or clog up your roadways and pollute while doing it inefficiently. A better commute might mean they actually have some time to stop and spend some money in Arlington too. That said, I’m not sure the HOT lanes is the solution (I do not support them). Nor is isolationism for Arlington. Wake up liberals.

      • V Dizzle

        Sorry, but how is this a “liberal” issue? Wouldn’t you consider it fiscal conservatism?

      • local

        Or you can get them to do it underground.

        • Westover

          Tried to do that in Tysons and folks objected to the costs, saying the money could be better spent elsewhere.

          • local

            I’m speaking in general terms. 40 years ago, Arlington rejected your line of thinking, that we had to have highways or nothing, and embraced Metro instead.

          • Westover

            The I-66/Metro Orange Line Project went hand in hand. I don’t think anyone was saying I-66 only. And don’t forget that the Metro did force a bunch of buildings in Ballston/Parkington to be knocked down. Some folks did lose homes or have to relocate offices for the long term greater good.

          • local

            There was definitely tension between the highway and Metro plans. The highway plans for new bridges and a larger, wider, uglier I-66 were on the table, and Arlington pushed back. On part of the deal was putting Metro in neighborhoods instead of along I-66.

            Yes, every project involves taking down some homes or businesses. I never said that was a deal-breaker. It’s an impact to be considered.

  • Lou

    Oh well, there are plenty of road projects elsewhere in the state to spend that $3 billion on. The new HOT lanes will instead connect around with the Beltway HOT lanes and feed Tysons, which is going to see a ton more office leases than Arlington over the next decades anyway. Arlington can continue to live in its bubble and the rest of the state can have new and better road networks.

    On a personal note, I would probably never pay to use a HOT lane in my own car. I’m just relieved that the individuals in the suit no longer have that burden weighing on them, and their family.

    • local

      There are plenty of road projects – and transit projects – in NoVa to spend that money on. Exactly. Don’t waste it.

    • Patrick

      I hope the county board realizes the collateral damage that has been caused by this lawsuit. Good luck getting funding from Richmond for your personal trolley car on the pike Mr. Zimmerman.

      • G

        Arlington wasn’t planning on getting money from the state in the first place for the trolley.

        • Wayne Kubicki

          Actually, not so – the County’s FY11-FY16 adopted Capital Improvement Plan projects getting nearly $19M from the State for the Pike trolley project.

          • ChrisG

            Wayne, We don’t take kindly to sourced facts around these parts. This is a place for over the top rhetoric and making up things to support our own positions. I’ve got my eye on you.

          • Wayne Kubicki

            Sorry…me bad!!!

    • BoredHouseWife

      The entitled can idle their cars in Tysons Corner and pollute their own neighborhoods.

      • Mike T.

        Wonderful! Why don’t we all just go back to ridding horses. Would that make all of you liberals happy!? Get a clue…the metro area population is GROWING so lets not exapand the roads? WTF??? It makes no sense. What a great way to keep Arlington from advancing with the rest of NOVA.

        • local

          Awesome false choice fallacy there, Mike.

          No, we don’t need to ride horses. We need to build neighborhoods that are capable of taking advantage of many choices of transportation, including buses and trains.

          It’s called “smart growth.” As opposed to “no growth.” Grow, but grow smart and not stupid.

          • Mike T.

            HAHA D bag! Great please build them ASAP!!! And we can all move there! What a fine utopian society it will be. Hopefully we can all wear uniforms too

          • AllenB

            They already exist – it’s called Arlington.

          • local

            Nobody’s advocating an impossible utopia. We build cities like this all the time, and it works just fine. If depending on highways only worked, LA would be a commuter’s paradise.

            And your immature use of an insult reveals your low level of thought.

          • Mike T.

            You are right. I hate cars and I wish everyone would stop driving them. Except for me. Paradox resolved! it is a win win for both of us!

          • Clarendude

            Kids and cars – everyone loves their own and wants everyone else’s to go away.

          • local

            Wow, Mike, that’s your third straight fallacy. It’s another strawman. Nobody is saying they want the right to drive their car while others can’t.

            Call me a D-bag again, that’s about the best you can do.

          • Westover

            Local, you are talking about new cities, like what is going up in the middle east I assume. It is not that simple in an already developed megaopolis.

          • local

            Huh? No I’m not. I’m talking about places like Arlington, which just 40 years ago had no subway and now has been completely transformed by it, for the better. And the whole metro area. You can build transit, underground or not, in an existing urban area.

          • Westover

            Buses need clear lanes if they are going to be of any use. Trains need more tracks if they are not going to backup themselves. Lanes are needed, I do not like cars idleing through Arlington spewing pollution, and even the hybrids spew in this bad of traffic. High Occupancy Toll lanes might not be the solution, but more lanes of some type sure are a part of the solution.

          • local

            Yes, I think new road capacity has to be part of the solution.

            That doesn’t mean HOT lanes on 395 are automatically in though.

        • BoredHouseWife

          If the company does not meet their expected earnings from the HOT lanes, the State must make up the difference.

          • Lou

            Which is a small price to pay when balanced against the savings by having the company fund the vast majority of construction in the first place.

            You people expect the roads to just stay like they are forever, and never add more roads or lanes. That’s just naive. You’ll end up paying to build roads later, or much later. The county has chosen the much later option, because the board will be long gone by then.

          • local

            Why is it a small price to pay? Private companies routinely put up all their cash and get all the risk along with the reward. Why should we bail them out if things don’t work out?

          • Westover

            Because we don’t want to scare off investment in the future.

          • local

            But we don’t do it for most other private companies. Do we issue gaurantees that if your business fails, we’ll bail you out? Other than banks on an ad hoc basis, of course.

            If they aren’t taking all the risk, they shouldn’t get all the profits. The taxpayers should get a little back. And if it does fail and we bail them out, we should take ownership too.

            But I don’t know the details of the agreement, obviously.

          • Westover

            Utilities have often provided guarantees of revenue when they are given the rights and responsibility to serve a community. I have not read the contract, some of the accusations seem a little over the top in compensation if for real, but it is not unprecedented.

          • local

            Okay, a utility model. That’s fine – as long as the utility is also regulated in exchange for its franchise.

      • Salvatore

        Isolate yourself and Arlington could just end up being ghetto. It is an act that has played out before in better communities.

        • local

          Yeah, I’m not that concerned about Arlington being isolated by lack of transportation to or through it. We’ve got two major highways, several bridges, and two subway lines already. Isolation is not the goal, nor is it possible anyway.

  • Jeff Miller

    Mr. Zimmerman’s comments to defend the County Board’s lawsuit were misleading. The lawsuit threatens public officials with individual monetary liability, placing a cloud over their personal finances. That’s an outrageous strong-arm tactic, and particularly reprehensible for a government agency to pursue.

    Public-sector employees and officials at all levels should be outraged by the tactics that Arlington County has used here.

    BTW, the County sued *FOUR* public officials as individuals: two in the Obama Administration (U.S. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood, FHWA Administrator Victor Mendez), one from the Kaine Administration (former Va. Transportation Secretary Pierce Homer), and one mid-level career federal employee (Edward Sundra of FHWA’s Richmond office). The lawsuit threatened the personal finances of all four.

    Mr. Zimmerman also misleads as to the outrageous racial claims in the lawsuit. In fact, the County Board’s lawsuit charges the individual defendants with DELIBERATE racial discrimination — an appalling and baseless charge. (See paras. 11, 15, 175 & 182 of the Board’s lawsuit, among others.)

    So the County Board has not only threatened the personal finances of other government officials, but it has also besmirched the good character of public servants. What an outrage!

    • Thes

      Jeff Miller is an honorable person and former Party chair who signed his name so we could know he is giving us the Republican Party message here.

      However, what this whole line of attack on the lawsuit fails to appreciate is that it is a *lawsuit*. If Arlington does not dot its “i”s and cross its “t”s in how they bring the suit, the judge can throw the whole thing out of court. What would truly have been a waste of Arlington’s taxpayer dollars would be to bring a suit that fails simply because Arlington technically sued the wrong person in the wrong way.

      Anyone familiar with complex litigation knows that the first step is to file suit against everyone for everything, to preserve your rights. As the case proceeds, individual defendants (such as the officials acting in their personal capacity) and individual claims (such as intentional racism) can be dropped by the judge once everyone is assured that the parties are unnecessary or the claims are not supported by the evidence.

      Notably, Arlington’s government did not make personal accusations of racism or attack individual officials outside the context of the lawsuit (even though they DID use public statements to attack the HOT lane proposal substantively). It is the Republican Party and their supporters who have tried to make it sound like the legal claims were more than just technicalities.

      Government workers get sued all the time in their personal capacity. It is routine. Short of criminal conduct (or FOIA violations, interestingly enough), they almost never have to pay a dime either to represent themselves or as part of the judgment.

      • http://arlingtondirt.blogspot.com/ TGEoA

        The lawsuit was a joke and had ZILCH to do with VDOT killing it.

        Transurban Fluor backed financing dried up two years ago.

      • Greg

        Counselor, which claim(s) in the Counties complaint risked dismissal if Arlington dropped its suit against government officials in their personal capacities for civil rights violations?

        Keep in mind, Arlington was not suing the individuals in their personal capacities to block the HOT lanes. That part of the suit was dismissed. It was only suing for a declaratory ruling that these individuals, acting in their personal capacities, violated certain civil and constitutional rights of Arlingtonians. The stated purpose of this claim was that Arlington intended to bring a subsequent suit for damages against these individuals, in their personal capacities, if the declaratory ruling was favorable.

        Also keep in mind that Arlington’s suit against certain individuals in their official capacities would remain. Those claims requested injunctive relief to block the HOT lanes.

        • Thes

          My previous comment was making a point about the general proposition that litigation requires technical allegations that are different than the main issue actually at stake (which in this case was that the 395-hotlanes proposal was stupid and damaging). I have no idea whether your assertions about which particular claims have been dismissed or retained at this particular moment in time are correct. However, the exact same analysis applies both to injunctive relief and damages: the careful litigant sues everyone for everything until the judge says they don’t need to. It would make no sense for example, for Arlington to preemptively forgo the opportunity to receive needed compensatory damages from an indemnified government official until the government conceded respondeat superior or other direct liability, or, as another example, waived sovereign immunity. In other words, it might have been that they only legal way for Arlington to get the money it needed to fix the expensive problems the hotlanes would have created would be from the “insurance policy” the government provides to the individual officials. As a taxpayer, I’m glad Arlington’s lawyers didn’t throw away that possibility just to reduce political criticism.

      • charlie

        i would be interested to see evidence of ANY Arlington or Virginia employee being sued in the same manner that Homer was sued.

  • Pingback: Arlington 1, State 0: State puts I-395 HOT Lanes project on hold; NoVA students will not go back to school before Labor Day; FFX teachers say they are overworked; and Synder sues Washington City Paper for “lies, half-truths, innuendos and anti-Semit

  • 395 is wide enough

    Great news. More lanes is only a temporary fix, then we’ll be back to the drawing board in 10 more years asking for more lanes. More lanes encourages more sprawl and development in further out counties, which is NOT benefitting Arlington or encouraging transit oriented “smart growth”. Build metro beyond Springfield, or subsidize cheaper commuter buses from points beyond Potomac Mills. 395 is only bad in peak directions at peak times. Otherwise there are more than enough lanes to shake a stick at. Don’t keep bulldozing our communities so you can have an oversized house way out in BFE and choke our are with fumes from your oversized SUV. The madness needs to come to an end. Watch the documentary “End of Suburbia”, and do some research about PEAK OIL. This is not bullshit, it’s coming sooner than we’d like to think.

    • Westover

      Of course it is only a temporary fix, we will always be developing and growing in this area. There is NO permanent fix, transportation is always an evolving project. No communities are being bulldozed. Yes, a few home might need to be taken down, but guess what, homes were knocked down to build the National Mall, homes were knocked down to expand the Capitol Complex. Even if Metro went further out, with only one track in each direction they are already pretty much at capacity and there is no way of having express trains. Sorry, but extra lanes are a needed part of our transportation solution.

      • 395 is wide enough

        Like I said, people who live way out in BFE chose that suburban lifestyle, the rest of Virginia deosnt need to subsidize them by building wider highways that are way under utilized off peak hours. Either deal with it, try carpooling, or tele-commute if that’s an option. Reducing traffic on 395 will only spur more sprawl in rural Stafford and Spotsylvania Counties and encourage people who may have tried transit or shared rides to get back in their own little SUV bubble. Sprawl sucks and is unsustainable.

      • Mike T.

        Nicely put bro!

        • Mike T.

          I should say Nicely put Westover!

        • Chad

          Who let you out of the weight room? It’s 11:50am here, isn’t it time to get off the boards and take your protein shake…bro!

          • Ballston

            -1

          • Mike T’s bro

            Don’t taze me, bro!

          • Ballston

            •This is The Situation right here, my abs are so ripped up it’s.. we call it The Situation.

          • Mike T’s bro

            Yo! Mike T wants some lanes, bro! Mike T don’t like to wait in traffic in his GTO, bro! Mike T thinks the solution to a problem is more of the same!

      • Ballston

        You hit the nail on the head. The planners of the metro system were total idiots by having only 2 tracks. Its not like there werent systems built already in the world with multiple tracks, it wasnt some crazy idea…… Building metro further out is not something that will solve the problem, its not even reliable close in. Someone sneezes on the western orange line or the western red line and the entire line is backed up…..

        We need more roads, more trains and more buses. It has to be a combination of all of that. But not expanding the highway network for a growing population is risking the economic vitality of the region as a whole and is short sighted and selfish.

      • local

        Homes were knocked down to build the National Mall?

        The area was pretty much empty in 1790. Maybe a few native American huts?

      • MIchael H.

        I think they knocked down some brothels and filled in old canals to build the National Mall.

        • local

          Maybe to expand it, but when the city was first built, there was nothing there but pasture. No city yet = no brothels or canals.

          • Westover

            The were houses where the Smithsonian Castle stands today and cabins in the area between what is now Independence and Constitution Aves.

      • local

        Sure, Westover, SOMETHING is needed for our transportation system. But you can’t just assume new lanes are the best solution.

        • Westover

          For the road part of the solution, more lanes are the answer. We need more than just that, but don’t think that other parts of the plan will alleviate the road traffic enough to avoid the lanes.

          • local

            Even with the road part, new lanes aren’t always the best way. Sometimes a spot improvement to an intersection or a bridge or a bottleneck is all that’s needed.

          • Westover

            Yes, we also need more bridge capacity across the Potomac.

  • Rover

    This is why I’m proud to be an Arlingtonian today. No band aids – real solutions. Well worth the money, time, and effort.

    • Rover

      Yet I seem to be as dumb as a box of rocks, so what do I really know?

  • BoredHouseWife

    Kudos for Zimmerman pointing out the ridiculous one-sided contract.

    • http://blacknell.net/dynamic MB

      The HOT lane contracts for the 495 expansion are almost criminally one-sided*. Not only do they have the state paying the private company if fewer people than expected pay to use the HOT lanes, the state is subject to punitive payments to the private company if it even improves roads that run parallel to the Beltway (i.e., roads that people might opt for over using the HOT lanes). Ah, those public-private partnerships are always great, aren’t they?

      *The VA state officials who negotiated and approved those should have to spend the rest of their lives circling the Beltway towing a billboard that says “I”m sorry, Virginians.”

      • BoredHouseWife

        I just don’t understad the defense of the HOT lanes. I think a majority are not aware of these facts.

        • Westover

          The Toll part of it is not being defended too strongly, but getting more lanes to help with traffic is strongly supported. The T part was just a way that the Commonwealth had found to fund the project without raising taxes and lowering congestion on those lanes.

          • local

            No, the T part is designed to allow HOV lanes to be used to full capacity. It allows people to buy their way onto the lanes even if they don’t have a passenger when there is room for them. As the leftover room goes down, the toll goes up.

            And no, it’s not just about adding lanes. Adding lanes without HOV restrictions would be even more pointless. Traffic would just fill them right up.

  • bob

    Zimmie is an idiot, but he is right on this one. And maybe those “innocent” civil servants shouldn’t be approving stupid and corrupt projects.

  • DT

    Congrats on making sure Richmond spends the next year or so making you pay for this. Some people know how politics work. None of them are on the County Politboro.

  • Arlwhenever

    This was a great decison by VDOT. Instead of HOT lanes on I395 it looks like we are going to get two additional inbound HOV off ramps inside the Beltway dumping traffic into the Alexandria/Arlington core. Currently, the only inbound inside the Beltway exit for the HOV crowd is at the Pentagon, straight into the labyrinth of the Pentagon parking complex, which as a practical matter limits use of the exit to Pentagon employees. The new plan will be a boon for commuters who live outside the Beltway and work in Arlington or Alexandria.

  • Mark

    Just to weigh in here. According to the contract signed by the state and the company running the HOT lanes, road development within so many miles of the HOT lanes wasn’t permitted for 50 years (i think). The thought being that the state/local government could improve surface streets and take PROFIT away from the company running the HOT lanes. In addition, if the company does not make over a specific % of profit on the HOT lanes the state has to make up the difference.

    Those both sound like horrible ideas for helping to improve the infrastructure in our area.

    • cj

      +10. The HOT-lane contract was an outrageous ripoff of the public to benefit private investors with no regard for long-term public interests. A great example of the perils of privatization.

  • Bender

    Let’s not pretend that Arlington government cares about environmental impact.

    Where are all the environmental impact studies for all of this hyper-development going on in the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor? Where are all the studies concerning the added burden caused by an extra thousands of people — most of them with cars — being jammed into an already over-crowded area?

    • Lou

      Exactly. They cared about the money, and the distribution of toll revenue going back into transit investment along the HOT lanes corridor. Now guess what, they are getting zero HOT lanes toll revenue to put back into transit investment along the corridor. No HOT lanes, no revenue sharing.

      • Mark

        There was going to be zero toll or revenue sharing until the HOT Lanes were over a certain % of profit (18% i think) and then that would be split 50/50 with the state. So Arlington sees no toll sharing whether there are hot lanes or not

      • Mark

        Arlington doesn’t get revenue back from the HOT lane tolls. After the company hits a certain % (i think its around 18%) they would then split the profit 50/50 with the state.

        • Lou

          And some of the state money goes into transit projects along the HOT lanes corridor. It does not go directly to Arlington so they can spend it on ART buses, it goes into improved commuter parking facilities, extra BRT routes that would utilize the new lanes, and other transit investment, paid at the state level, but targeted to the corridor with the HOT lanes. I never said Arlington would get the money as a direct payment.

    • local

      It’s so easy to ask questions and assume there are no good answers. It’s an easy rhetorical device.

      In the case of the urban corridor you mentioned, it’s very pro-environment to put development in a concentrated area when there is public transportation to serve it. By doing this, the County keeps cars off the roads and shortens drive time (and therefore pollution and oil consumption) for those who do drive by allowing more to live close to job centers. It also can help keep development from consuming land and degrading water quality too, in the grander scheme of things.

      I’m sure you can find lots of careful consideration of this and other environmental considerations in Arlington’s development discussions – if you bother to actually go look.

      Arlington County has a very solid record of caring for the environment, probably the best in the area or the state of Virginia.

  • Bender

    **Wonderful! Why don’t we all just go back to riding horses. Would that make all of you liberals happy!? Get a clue…the metro area population is GROWING so lets not expand the roads? WTF??? It makes no sense.**

    Mike — this is not about Winning the Future (WTF), this is about Winning the Past (WTP). This is about going back to 19th century technology (streetcars) and 18th century lifestyles (everyone residing, working, and spending their entire lives within walking distance of their Urban Village paradise (except for the County Board elite, of course, who continue to live in their million-dollar mansions)).

    • KalashniKEV

      +1 Excellent post.

    • local

      Look, another ridiculous strawman! Don’t you guys have anything good?

      Besides, massive highways are “the past” anyway.

    • sad

      “the County Board elite…who continue to live in their million-dollar mansions”>?: You might want to check the real estate assessment page before you make up anything else

      • http://arlingtondirt.blogspot.com/ TGEoA

        Hynes is the only one whose house is over a million. Favola’s is just a tad under.

        Click on the link on my name above and you can see all of the CB members property values.

    • mehoo

      Hey Bender and Kev, build your neighborhoods too by using smart tools like transit instead of whining about other people’s success.

  • bob

    http://www.projectfinancemagazine.com/Article/2760933/Type-News/Transurbans-Capital-Beltway-faces-LC-uncertainty.html

    Ever wonder why they need to bail out Portuguese banks…they invest in crap projects.

  • Take it down a notch

    Wasn’t the HOT lane construction put on hold due to lack of funding? I’m wondering if that was part of the reason for this change in plans, but no one seems to be mentioning it at all.

  • Westover

    Yeah, the suit had little to NOTHING to do with the hold put on the HOT Lanes. The Board can be happy, but they should not be patting themselves on the back.

    • local

      Kinda indicates the importance of using transportation money wisely though.

  • 395 is wide enough

    heres another wonderful idea for the whiners who want to live outside the belyway and drive their chariots in every day… Try picking up 2 other souls to sail in on the already wide open HOV lanes, you might even make a few friends in the process. Either that or you could get a motorcycle.

    • Westover

      It is not wide open once you hit Shirlington. Don’t think that those of us in Arlington are not adding to the traffic load just because we are a little closer in. We probably could do with a couple more river crossings too!

      • Lou

        You know what really made Zimmerman drop a pant load, was that the projected HOT lane trip from Shirlington to the Pentagon would cost a driver less than a dollar and take about 5 minutes. Compare that to their sacred cow transit solution for the same trip, and you see why they hate HOT lanes.

        • local

          It’s so easy to make up thoughts inside other people’s heads, isn’t it?

          • Lou

            It’s fact my multi-sock friend. You can read about it on the internets.

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