Arlington, VA

You’re invited by the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University to join the upcoming Master’s and Certificate Virtual Open House for prospective students. The online session will provide an overview of the Schar School’s top-ranked master’s degree programs and graduate certificate programs, student services, and admissions requirements.

Virtual Master’s And Certificate Open House

Thursday, May 28
6:30-7:30 p.m. (EDT)
Virtual Session

Click here to register for the virtual open house

George Mason’s Schar School of Policy and Government is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 2 best school in the U.S. for security studies programs relating to intelligence, counterterrorism and emergency management. With dedicated career services advisors, 16,000+ passionate alumni around the globe, and a faculty of leaders and experts in their fields, you will benefit from a world-class education.

Graduate Certificate Programs (5 Courses Each)

Part-time and full-time options available

Master’s Degree Programs

Part-time and full-time options available

In response to the COVID-19 crisis, the Schar School is waiving GRE/GMAT test score requirements and application fees for Fall 2020 applicants.

To learn more about graduate programs at the Schar School, fill out the inquiry form to indicate your interest to the Admissions team or register for the May 28 virtual open house.

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Since launching in 2019, the Juris Master Degree Program (JM) at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School has assisted students in building professional and social connections.

The JM Degree is designed for professionals who interact with lawyers and legal issues regularly in the course of their careers. This type of program is in high demand and now offered by over half of all tier one law schools.

“We are proud to offer the Juris Master Degree Program at Scalia Law School,” said Dean Henry N. Butler. “This is an opportunity for professionals to learn the law, so they will be better equipped to provide leadership in their respective fields.”

Scalia Law’s two-year part-time program is offered at the Arlington campus, and enrollment for the August 2020 class is currently OPEN.

As listed on the JM Degree website, https://jurismaster.gmu.edu/, in addition to general legal research, writing and introductory law courses, JM students can select law school courses from six concentration areas:

  • Criminal Justice
  • Employment & Labor Relations
  • Financial & Commercial Services
  • Government Contracts & Regulations
  • Intellectual Property & Technology
  • National Security, Cybersecurity & Information Privacy

JM students can maintain employment schedules, while benefiting from the opportunities afforded by a tier-one law school.

There is a growing base of legal services and legal knowledge required by employers and the JM Degree is designed to educate students with the legal knowledge necessary for them to succeed in their chosen professions.

Applications are being accepted now. For more information about the JM Degree Program, please visit our website or contact Jessica L. Sartorius, Director of Juris Master (JM) Degree Program, at [email protected] or 703-993-8418.

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Morning Notes

Fire Union Raises Alarm About Lack of Quarantining — “An Arlington County firefighter tested positive for coronavirus this week and the union is concerned that colleagues were not told to quarantine.” [NBC 4]

The Toll for First Responders During the Outbreak — “We are starting to see the mental and physical toll that this pandemic is having on our members and their families. Please continue to practice social distancing and listen to the local leaders.” [Twitter]

Signs of Support From the Community — Signs and other expressions of appreciation for first responders have been popping up around Arlington, as have signs urging continued social distancing. [Twitter, Twitter, Twitter]

GMU Prof Trying to Spur Coronavirus Solutions — “George Mason University professor Tyler Cowen hopes to incentivize a stronger response to the coronavirus by distributing more than $1 million in prizes for research leading to immediate help in fighting the pandemic.” [George Mason University]

Beyer Supports Relief Bill — Said Rep. Don Beyer, regarding the record 3.3 million new unemployment claims: “These numbers are far worse than anything we saw during the Great Recession. We need to move quickly to help those that are getting hurt… That is why the bill passed by the Senate to increase unemployment insurance by an extra $600 a week for four months and make billions available for small business grants and loan payments is so important.” [House of Representatives]

Local Testing is Taking a Long Time — “An Arlington, Virginia, resident told Axios he got tested a week ago, but his results have now been delayed twice; he’ll likely end up waiting nine to 10 days for his results.” [Axios]

Ambar Offering Family-Style Meals to Go — “Street Guys Hospitality, renowned for its neighborhood restaurants that offer set price, next-level Balkan & Mexican dining without limits, is stepping up with a plan to help feed the communities it serves while supporting its staff members during this crisis.” [Press Release]

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A student who attended classes at George Mason University’s Arlington campus has tested positive for the coronavirus, the university says.

GMU says it was notified about the positive test last night.

“On the evening of March 19, George Mason University was made aware that a student who attended classes in Arlington tested positive for coronavirus and is receiving treatment at a local hospital,” the university said in a statement. “An investigation is being conducted by the local health department to determine if anyone else within our community should take additional precautions such as self-isolation or quarantine.”

“The student does not reside on campus, and to our knowledge, the last time that this student was on the Arlington campus was on March 4,” the statement continued.

As of noon on Friday, there were 114 known COVID-19 cases in Virginia, out of 2,325 tests, according to the state Dept. of Health. Arlington’s case count remained steady at 17.

The full statement from GMU, which was emailed to students and staff, is below.

Dear Mason Patriots,

On the evening of March 19, George Mason University was made aware that a student who attended classes in Arlington tested positive for coronavirus and is receiving treatment at a local hospital. While this student is undergoing treatment, please be considerate of the student’s privacy and wellbeing. We all wish the student a quick recovery and the university is working to provide the student with assistance and support.

An investigation is being conducted by the local health department to determine if anyone else within our community should take additional precautions such as self-isolation or quarantine. The student does not reside on campus, and to our knowledge, the last time that this student was on the Arlington campus was on March 4.

The university has taken aggressive steps to prevent the spread of coronavirus within the Mason community by moving classes to an online format, cancelling events, and promoting telework whenever possible. Given these precautions and what we know about the situation, the risk of exposure to other students, faculty, and staff who visited the Arlington campus remains low.

We encourage anyone that has concerns about potential exposure to await official guidance from the health department or university before taking additional precautions.  Individuals who were at risk of exposure will be contacted directly and provided specific guidance. The actions the university is taking are consistent with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Virginia Department of Health guidelines, but we understand that this situation may cause some anxiety in our community.

If you have individual concerns about the university’s response, please contact [email protected] At this time, we continue to stress the importance of general precautions; wash your hands, practice good hygiene, monitor yourself for illnesses, remain home if you are sick, and continue to practice social distancing. If you feel ill or have concerns about your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

For more information about coronavirus, please visit www.gmu.edu/coronavirus.

Photo via Google Maps

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Since launching in 2019, the Juris Master Degree Program (JM) at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School has assisted students in building professional and social connections.

The JM Degree is designed for professionals who interact with lawyers and legal issues regularly in the course of their careers. This type of program is in high demand and now offered by over half of all tier one law schools.

“We are proud to offer the Juris Master Degree Program at Scalia Law School,” said Dean Henry N. Butler. “This is an opportunity for professionals to learn the law, so they will be better equipped to provide leadership in their respective fields.”

Scalia Law’s two-year part-time program is offered at the Arlington campus, and enrollment for the August 2020 class is currently OPEN.

As listed on the JM Degree website, https://jurismaster.gmu.edu/, in addition to general legal research, writing and introductory law courses, JM students can select law school courses from six concentration areas:

  • Criminal Justice
  • Employment & Labor Relations
  • Financial & Commercial Services
  • Government Contracts & Regulations
  • Intellectual Property & Technology
  • National Security, Cybersecurity & Information Privacy

JM students can maintain employment schedules, while benefiting from the opportunities afforded by a tier-one law school.

There is a growing base of legal services and legal knowledge required by employers and the JM Degree is designed to educate students with the legal knowledge necessary for them to succeed in their chosen professions.

Applications are being accepted now. For more information about the JM Degree Program, please visit our website or contact Jessica L. Sartorius, Director of Juris Master (JM) Degree Program, at [email protected] or 703-993-8418.

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The Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University is offering two open houses this spring — one for PhD studies, and one for master’s degree programs.

These open houses are held on the Arlington Campus, located a few blocks from both the Clarendon and Virginia Square Metro Stations. During the open houses, you’ll have the opportunity to speak with program faculty and student and career services staff, as well as current students, alumni, and members of the Graduate Admissions Office.

Light hors d’oeuvres will be served. We hope you can join us!

PHD OPEN HOUSE

Wednesday, March 18
7-8:30 p.m.
Arlington, VA Campus

MASTER’S OPEN HOUSE

Thursday, March 26
6:30-8 p.m.
Arlington, VA Campus

George Mason’s Schar School of Policy and Government is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 2 best school in the U.S. for security studies programs relating to intelligence, counterterrorism and emergency management. With dedicated career services advisors, 16,000+ passionate alumni around the globe, and a faculty of leaders and experts in their fields, you will benefit from a world-class education.

DOCTORAL PROGRAMS

Part-time and full-time options available

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

Part-time and full-time options available

To learn more about our programs, fill out our inquiry form to indicate your interest to the Admissions team or register for one of our upcoming open houses.

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George Mason University’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution has been renamed.

The school, based at GMU’s campus in Virginia Square, is now the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution.

The efforts of the former president and his wife to promote peace around the world is the impetus for the name change, which is also part of a $10 million fundraising campaign. The school is now “dedicating itself to peace and social justice.”

More from GMU’s website:

The name change serves as a tribute to the Carters’ steadfast commitment to peacemaking through nonviolence and the transformative role of dialogue and diplomacy in conflict resolution. It also serves to recognize that the school has grown and changed in reputation and scope since its birth in 1981. The move comes as an acknowledgment that the Carters’ devotion to peace and human rights reflects the values of both the school and Mason as a whole.

“By becoming the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, we’ll be starting the next phase of our journey as an institution committed to furthering both the research and practice of conflict resolution and peacebuilding,” said Alpaslan Ozerdem, dean of the school. “In this effort, we will be taking the Carters’ unwavering dedication to peace as our beacon and our guide. It’s a great honor to be leading a school named after one of the greatest peacemakers of our times.”

Mason’s Board of Visitors approved the change on Feb. 27. The school plans a series of events  in September that will include  other Mason colleges and schools to celebrate the new phase for the school and the Carters’ legacy on human rights, democracy, gender equality and global health.

George Mason is in the midst of a quarter-billion-dollar effort to expand its Arlington campus. On Feb. 25, GMU held a forum for developers interested in submitting conceptual proposals for the project.

Photo courtesy Jeremy Galliani

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The Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University is building on the school’s existing expertise in security studies (the Schar School is ranked No. 2 by U.S. News & World Report in this category) with a new Graduate Certificate in Strategic Trade.

Strategic trade policy implies a strategic relationship between firms, countries, and export control regimes. It includes arms control, nuclear nonproliferation, and a variety of national security issues plaguing all nation states.

“This program will help students pursue jobs in trade compliance, export controls, and dual-use trade controls in both the public and private realms,” said program director Kenneth Reinert, who also oversees the Schar School’s Master’s in International Commerce and Policy program.

“We designed the Graduate Certificate in Strategic Trade […] to position students for career success in a rapidly evolving global economy.”

Reinert founded the program along with professor Andrea Viski, founder and editor-in-chief of the Strategic Trade Review and founder and director of the Strategic Trade Research Institute.

The Graduate Certificate in Strategic Trade program is the ninth graduate certificate in the Schar School’s growing portfolio of top-ranked programs. Completion of the certificate requires five courses (15 credits), including one core course in Strategic Trade Controls, and the choice of four electives in a range of topics including nuclear nonproliferation, national security technology, illicit trade, arms control, and global trade relations.

Certificate programs are an increasingly popular credential to bolster a resume and navigate career changes and advancement. The Schar School’s certificate programs are designed to feed into the master’s degrees — certificate earners can count their five completed certificate courses towards their master’s degrees, saving time and tuition expenses.

To learn more about the Schar School’s graduate programs and how to apply, request information here, or browse campus visit options here.

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Morning Notes

Amazon Buys Pentagon City Site — “Amazon.com Inc. has quietly purchased the 6.2-acre Pentagon City site where its first pair of HQ2 towers will be built. Acorn Development LLC, an Amazon subsidiary that is often listed when the company files for permits or makes land acquisitions, purchased the Metropolitan Park site on Jan. 15 from JBG Smith Properties (NYSE: JBGS) for $154.95 million, according to Arlington County records.” [Washington Business Journal]

Waverly Hills is Hot — “‘Hot’ is a subjective term in any context, including real estate. While it’s possible to measure the number of sales, price increases and how quickly homes sell, what draws one buyer doesn’t always appeal to other buyers.
According to Redfin real estate brokerage, Willowsford in Ashburn, Va., and Waverly Hills in Arlington are the No. 1 and No. 5 hottest neighborhoods in the country.” [Washington Post]

Next Step for GMU Expansion — “University officials released a request for proposals Tuesday, looking for developers interested in teaming up with Mason to build a new home for the Institute of Digital Innovation on its Virginia Square property. The building is set to include a mix of uses across its 460,000 square feet, with room for classes and research labs alongside space for companies big and small looking to partner with the university.” [Washington Business Journal]

High Water Bill Saga Continues — Residents are still seeking answers to the recent spate of high water bills, even though it appears that the drought — and outdoor irrigation — during that time period is to blame. The COO of Arlington’s Dept. of Environmental Services “said about 3,900 people, 11 percent of the county’s residential customers, had their bills double. He said during the 2016 drought that number was about 2,000 to 2,500 people.” [WUSA 9]

Macy’s to Close Stores — Facing major retail headwinds, Macy’s is planning to close 125 of its stores, nearly a fifth of all of its current stores, over the next three years. So far the exact location of most of the closures have not been announced. There are two Macy’s stores in Arlington, at mall in Pentagon City and Ballston. [Wall Street Journal]

Va. Lawmakers Considering Stronger SLAPP Law — “Many states have enacted tough laws making it harder to get away with so-called SLAPP suits: nuisance litigation designed to bury its targets in paperwork and fees. Virginia, however, is considered friendlier to those kinds of filings, and some experts and advocates say that has become a problem.” [Washingtonian]

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A free one-night seminar November 21 for prospective graduate students explores policies behind AI, big data, Uber, blockchain and more.

The Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University is offering a rare opportunity to sample a range of courses across the Master’s in Transportation Policy, Operations, and Logistics program in an evening focusing on “Transportation in the City of the Future.” The 90-minute sampler takes place Thursday, November 21, from 6:30-8 p.m. at George Mason University’s Arlington Campus.

“This will cut across all of our courses and some of the other programs offered at the Schar School,” said Laurie A. Schintler, director of the dynamic and timely Master’s in Transportation Policy, Operations, and Logistics program. “We will focus on emerging technologies in smart cities, which is very hot right now. We’ll look at everything from drones and autonomous vehicles to transportation economics and logistics.”

The sample class will also examine ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft, big data, the use of blockchain and AI in transportation, flexible and on-demand transit systems, shared-use vehicles, mobile payment systems, and a methods course and a systems course. New electives addressing additional topics, including one focusing on automated vehicles, will be introduced.

Just as importantly, Schintler will also address “the social, ethical and institutional issues that go along with these technologies,” she said. Those issues include planning, policy and privacy as well as inclusiveness, sustainability and livable communities.

The title may suggest the “City of the Future,” but Schintler said the future is already here, and so are employment opportunities.

“There are jobs in the field, but you do have to be abreast of the cutting edge,” she said. “Things are changing rapidly.”

The session is free for prospective graduate students. Space is limited. Register here. #ScharSchool

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The expansion of George Mason University’s campus in Virginia Square is envisioned as a gleaming glass-and-steel tower with the school’s distinctive “M” emblazoned on top.

That’s according to a new concept design for GMU’s planned Institute for Digital Innovation, released as the university announced $235 million in new funding from the state to expand the campus and develop more tech talent. The new building will be built atop the long-shuttered Kann’s Department Store, on the west side of the Fairfax Drive campus.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced the funding for GMU and ten other Virginia universities on Thursday, citing Amazon’s HQ2 in Arlington as a key reason why the Commonwealth needs more tech workers.

“Virginia will invest in the Commonwealth’s tech talent pipeline to create 31,000 new computer science graduates over 20 years, under agreements he signed with 11 universities,” the governor’s office said in a press release. “The Tech Talent Investment Program will benefit students and tech employers in every corner of the Commonwealth. It grew out of Virginia’s proposal to Amazon, which will locate its second headquarters in Northern Virginia.”

In its own press release, below, GMU said the state funding — along with an expanded Arlington campus — will help it produce 16,000 more undergrad and master’s graduates in tech fields over the next 20 years.

The press release says additional information about the new Institute for Digital Innovation facility will be revealed at an event on Wednesday, Nov. 20, which will celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Arlington campus, which currently includes includes the Antonin Scalia Law School, the Schar School of Policy and Government and other departments, mostly focusing on graduate and professional programs.

The full GMU press release is below, after the jump.

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