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Brewery and Coffee Roastery Hopes to Come to Clarendon

A Manassas-based brewery is hoping to open a location in Clarendon.

Heritage Brewing Co. has started a Kickstarter campaign with the hopes of raising $30,000 in startup costs to open a brewpub and coffee roastery on Fillmore Street, between Wilson and Clarendon Blvds.

So far, the company — which launched in 2013 with the help of another Kickstarter campaign — has raised just over $2,200.

Says the Kickstarter page:

We’ve found a vacant restaurant space in Clarendon, Arlington with the vision of making it into a fully functioning nano-brewery, coffee roastery, and small plate restaurant.

The Market Common location will be open 7 days a week with snacks in the morning and small plate meals throughout the afternoon and evening, paired with our barrel series and flagship craft beers.

In partnership with our sister company Veritas Coffee we will run a full fledged coffee bar every morning and afternoon featuring our patented cold press coffee as well as pour over and packaged varieties.

Our award-winning barrel series beers have long needed a space to call their own. In the new location, we envision giving them a chance to shine. We’ll offer barrel releases monthly, and limited edition beers aged on-site in both a variety of barrels and a seven bbl foder for unique flavor additions.

We imagine the space built out to fit our proud industrial American aesthetic. Plenty of wood barrels actively aging our beers for your enjoyment, and accents of their likeness spread throughout to adorn the space.

Your help and donations will go to outfitting the bar, purchasing glassware, barware, merchandise, fridges, menus, and paying for initial salaries of new hires. This is no small undertaking and the support we asked for during our initial start up was instrumental in the making of our success.

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Arlington Dads Launch the Child Safe Internet “netpure™”

netpure™ home WiFiThe following is a promoted post written and sponsored by netpure™

Two Arlington dads have launched a company that adds a child safe WiFi network to your home in two steps. The Internet is the greatest educational resource in the history of man, but it is also a dangerous place, especially, for children. Jere Simpson and Jared Agnew, co-­founders of netpure™ and fathers themselves, know this as well as anyone — thus they have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the solution to every parent’s worst nightmare.

Founder Video: https://youtu.be/KwRg74uxlwQ

Jere and Jared have spent the past 20 years building world class Internet security systems for the FBI, Navy SEALS and more. They have used insight gained from building these complex and secure systems to provide a safe Internet experience for children. Now, parents, grandparents, educators and others, can have their own user­ friendly plug-­n-­play device that will protect even the most curious children from unsafe content on the Internet.

“Recently, we collaborated with the best and brightest minds from our respective companies and created a new company,” explained Jere Simpson, Co-­Founder of netpure™. “Together, we have been building award­ winning systems with companies like Dell, Samsung, and Amazon for years, but this is truly our proudest accomplishment and we are now ready to share it with the world.”

So, how does it work? Simply, plug netpure™ into your router, register, and enjoy the benefits of a new, child safe, Wi­Fi network for your children and their friends, compatible with any Wi­Fi device. Children simply connect their devices to the netpure™ WiFi, while parents continue business as usual with their unchanged WiFi settings. No more configuring each and every device that comes in and out of the home. Parents will also have the option to set designated times for educational content exclusively or to turn their kid’s internet off altogether from their smart phone or watch. In addition, they will receive text alerts and monthly data analytics of family activity that will keep them aware of their children’s online behavior.

Inspiration: The two dads were frustrated by the complexity of parent control options and the ever growing digital dangers. They have worked closely with “O.U.R,” a non-profit group of former Navy SEALS that rescues children who have been kidnapped. These experiences inspired them to bring netpure™ to market. Find out more at ourrescue.org.

The Kickstarter campaign goal is set at $80,000 and the campaign will run 30 days beginning on Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016. Kickstarter backers can receive netpure™ in their homes four months ahead of the general public at up to a 40% discount. The cellular version of their solution arrives this summer and is included for existing customers. To learn more about the product, visit netpure.com.

Quick Facts
Company: netpure™
Website: http://netpure.com
Twitter: @net_pure
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/netpure/

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Morning Notes

Ballston Common Mall food court (Flickr pool photo by Joe Green)

County Gov’t Open on Columbus Day — Arlington County government offices will be open on Monday, Oct. 12. Courts, the Sheriff’s Office, the DMV and Arlington Public Schools, however, will be closed in observance of the Columbus Day holiday. [Arlington County]

Arlington Same-Sex Marriage Stats — Over the past year, same-sex marriages have accounted for 7.2 percent of all marriage licenses in Arlington County. [InsideNova]

Teachers Endorse Cristol, Dorsey — The Arlington Education Association Political Action Committee, which represents Arlington Public Schools teachers, has endorsed Democrats Katie Cristol and Christian Dorsey in the upcoming County Board general election. [Christian Dorsey]

Suburban Pols Rail Against I-66 Tolls — Lawmakers from the outer Northern Virginia suburbs are calling VDOT’s proposal to add tolls to I-66 “highway robbery.” Said a Republican state lawmaker from Manassas: “Asking commuters from Prince William, Manassas, Fairfax and Loudoun to pay such an outrageous amount for the privilege of sitting in the same unmoving lanes of traffic so Arlington can have nice new bike paths is unconscionable.” [InsideNova]

British School Choir Coming to Arlington — The IPS singers, a school choir from London, will perform “sacred choral works by famed composers” at the Church at Clarendon (1210 N. Highland Street) next Friday, Oct. 16, at 7 p.m.

Arlington Bros Create ‘B.R.O. Ball’ — Two federal contractors from Arlington, along with a third partner, are trying to raise $75,000 on Kickstarter to make a football with a waterproof Bluetooth speaker inside. They have dubbed the ball the “B.R.O. Ball.” [Washington Business Journal]

Flickr pool photo by Joe Green

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Do-it-Yourself Whiskey Aging Kit Seeks Kickstarter Contributions

Startup Monday header

Editor’s Note: Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Ageit Yourself co-founders Michael Volz, left, and Bryan OlsonMichael Volz and Bryan Olson look like kids in a candy store in Volz’s kitchen, filled with jars of differently colored and aged liquors, with wood charring in the oven and a German shepherd peeking his snout in for smells of the activity.

This is ground zero for Age it Yourself, the company Volz and Olson started this year that allows anyone with their kit to barrel-age whiskey — or any liquor, for that matter — without waiting years and using giant, or even small barrels.

The method is simple. Each kit comes with a mason jar and freshly charred American oak, from fallen trees in the backyard of Olson’s family’ home in Great Falls. The oak is cut in a specific way to maximize the long grain wood — the only part of a real barrel liquor touches — and charred in a custom oven Volz built with his carpenter father.

The wood, jar, a special glass bottle, a flask, a funnel and instructions are then shipped, ready to use. Whoever buys the kit simply has to add the liquor, which can be anything from moonshine, to create a standard aged whiskey, bourbon, to age it further, or even cocktails like Manhattans. The kits sell for $50, and each batch of oak can be used about three times.

Age it Yourself's sample batchesTo help launch the company, Volz and Olson created a Kickstarter with a goal of $10,000 to buy more glass, fulfill orders faster and generate buzz. Volz admitted that he and Olson have slaved over the method and recipes so much that they haven’t focused much on the digital marketing side of the business — the Kickstarter has 12 backers and $731 donated with 17 days to go — but the Kickstarter is just one component of the business.

“We’re sort of going at it with three tiers,” Volz said. “There’s the retailers and customers and, there’s the wholesalers to push it to more people, and one thing we’re seeing that we didn’t expect is the producers, the distilleries, have interest.”

One distillery, Iowa Legendary Rye, is already in contact with Volz and Olson. The market is there, as Olson said, because “If you want to start a new liquor company, and you want to sell aged liquor, you can’t sell it until it’s aged. You need to age it quicker.”

The Age it Yourself kitVolz and Olson met at law school at George Mason University in Arlington, and both graduated this spring right as they were developing the idea. Volz is a veteran of the D.C. bar and restaurant scene, and he’s used his connections to place Age it Yourself in a few locations, including The Liberty Tavern in Clarendon, that want to barrel-age their cocktails on the bar.

The interest from businesses along the supply chain of the liquor market gives the pair confidence that regardless of the Kickstarter, they have a viable path to move forward as a successful endeavor.

Of course, the big question with a company like Age it Yourself: how does it taste? How does it work?

Volz and Olson indulged ARLnow.com with a brief tasting session, starting off with a sip of moonshine “to see what we’re starting with.” After that, it was on to the whiskey, aged in the jar for just over a week. The first difference was the color: the spirit starts to brown within hours after contacting the oak. After a week it’s a deep, translucent color, and it tastes sweeter, and, like Volz described, a little like a campfire.

The Age it Yourself team: from left, Taylor Kampa, Bryan Olson and Michael VolzAfter the whiskey, it was on to the negroni — a gin, vermouth and Campari cocktail — which was delicious. The coup de gras was the tequila, aged in the jar, and smooth all the way down.

“The tequila is unbelievable,” Olson said, commenting on Volz’s constant experimentation. “Everything we’ve made with our final product right now is great, but we’re always improving.”

Age it Yourself kits that are purchased through Kickstarter are expected to arrive before Christmas for gift season. Volz and Olson said they were inspired by another Arlington startup, Homemade Gin Kit, but the pair’s vision goes far beyond mailing boxes, bottles and wood.

“A year from now I’d love to have a system set up where we’re developing new flavors, we have enough of a customer base for people to get excited about it,” Olson said. “We’re looking into expanding into other areas, like selling more traditional, larger barrels, and trying to get into a lot more bars. Five years from now, we’d love to partner with a distillery or, maybe, create one ourselves.”

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Urban Planning Card Game Exceeds Kickstarter Goal

Startup Monday header

Editor’s Note: Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups, founders and funders. The Ground Floor is Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Cards from the Cards Against Urbanity party gameIf there’s a game that seems tailor-made for Arlington, it’s a take on a boozy card game that encourages thinking about smart growth and urban planning.

That’s the premise behind “Cards Against Urbanity,” a spinoff of the popular Cards Against Humanity party game that replaces the original’s mix of raunchy and offensive questions and answers with tongue-in-cheek  cards about living in a city. Cards include questions like “My city’s latest economic plan is _____” with answers like “Sexy firefighter fundraisers.”

Cards Against Urbanity is a Kickstarter idea, with a deadline: the only time people can buy the game is by donating to the Kickstarter, which closes at 10:19 p.m. A $30 pledge gets the funder the 234-card game, and a pledge of $65 also includes a Cards Against Urbanity T-shirt.

Cards Against Urbanity’s cards are the same size and materials as the original to allow for crossover and mixing and matching with the original game and its expansion packs. According to the game’s creators, there won’t be any chances to buy the game after 10:19 tonight.

The game’s creators are all planners, architects and economic development professionals with D.C. ties. The idea was started by Lisa Nisenson, an urban planner and co-founder of crowdsourced urban design solutions startup GreaterPlaces, and Sarah Lewis, of the urban planning think tank DoTank DC. The two and a group of urban planners and architects were at a planning conference, Nisenson said, playing Cards Against Humanity when someone suggested “it’d be fun to have a city version” of the game.

A month later, neither Lewis nor Nisenson could get the idea out of their head, so they decided to make the game. They asked permission from Cards Against Humanity, which allowed the team to develop the idea, as long as they agreed “not to make any money off of it,” Nisenson said.

“What we’re asking for is just to cover the cost of the game and the Kickstarter,” Nisenson said.

She, Lewis and their five co-creators guessed how many of their friends would buy the game and priced the Kickstarter goal accordingly. They figured 250 people would buy it, so they set the goal at $7,500. With a little more than 10 hours to go, the campaign has 753 backers and has raised $26,393.

Initially, the game creators thought only other planners, architects and economic development workers would have interest in the game, but the response — which has been across the spectrum and global — has changed her tune.

Cards Against Urbanity co-creator Lisa Nisenson“Our big takeaway from this is that if you make planning fun,” Nisenson said, “there is an audience that is really hungry for it.”

As they were developing the game, Nisenson and Lewis were giving some cards a test drive at “a rooftop happy hour” in Arlington when other customers approached them, asked to play, and offered their own suggestions for cards, like an answer card that says simply “Lead Paint. YOLO.”

“Everyone was immediately into it,” Lewis said. “They asked to join us and play a couple rounds. It validated our initial thoughts that this was something people would want to play and enjoy.”

Nisenson said that even though Arlington is viewed nationally as a model for inclusive city planning and urban design, there is still a huge opportunity to engage people who are invested in the community but, for whatever reason, haven’t previously been involved in the process.

“Cities are hot,” Nisenson said. “People want to know how to get involved and they don’t know where to start.”

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