Arlington, VA

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Answer: Thank you to the ARLnow reader who brought Virginia House Bill 1842 to my attention because it’s likely to be a game-changing law. This bill will allow condo boards to more easily ban smoking inside units and on balconies — not just in common areas. As of Feb. 17, 2021, the bill passed the Virginia House and Senate and, per my conversation with staff of the bill’s sponsor, Delegate Mark Keam, it’s now on its way to the Governor’s desk to become Virginia law as of July 1, 2021.

This is incredible news for many condo owners and residents who have suffered from the health and environmental hazards of a neighbor who smokes inside their unit or on their balcony. Over the years, I’ve written more about condo smoking bans than any other non-market topic because of how much interest and positive feedback I receive on the topic — so much that I hosted a panel discussion about it in 2019.

A full summary of the bill is shared below, but the key text from the bill includes, “…the executive board of a condominium unit owners’ association to establish reasonable rules that restrict smoking in the condominium, including rules that prohibit smoking in the common elements and within units…”

Under current laws, a smoking ban within units can only be done by way of a formal bylaw amendment, which can be overly burdensome for most communities and take years to see through. The only “easy” smoking ban allowed by law was a ban in general common areas. Even limited common areas (e.g. balconies) require a bylaw change under the current laws.

I am no legal expert, and I’m sure the language in the bill can be interpreted a number of different ways, but this bill seems to give condo boards/owners a very good chance of banning smoking within units. I’d love to hear from any readers who have the legal background to interpret just how likely or unlikely the language in this bill is to allow complete smoking bans.

Read More

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: How is the real estate market doing so far this year?

Answer: 2020 ended with a surging single-family and townhouse market, especially farther west from buyers looking for more house and yard space, but a struggling condo market from an unusually high volume of condo inventory for sale and tepid condo demand. So what have we seen in the first six weeks of the 2021 real estate market?

Single-Family and Townhouse Prices Up

The single-family and townhouse market is appreciating even further above where prices settled in 2020, with more competition (double-digit multiple offers). Through deals I’ve been involved in and conversations I’ve had with colleagues, my unofficial estimate is that many single-family homes and townhouses are selling for 5-10% more than 2020 prices. I’m seeing this type of appreciation at all different price points, too.

Condo Market Better, Slow Improvement Expected

The condo market worsened monthly from about June 2020 to November 2020, but it reversed course a bit in December and remained slightly improved in January. I see the condo market picking back up at a slow pace and likely to continue improving through the spring as demand hopefully/probably picks up, but I don’t see a return to the pre-COVID condo market any time soon.

Let’s take a look at some key charts for Arlington and Northern Virginia (Fairfax and Loudoun counties).

Arlington Months of Supply

Months of Supply is one of my favorite metrics because it combines supply and demand. The lower the Months of Supply, the more favorable a market is for sellers. Housing economists say that a well-balanced market has about six months of supply.

Single-family homes in Arlington hit an all-time low for Months of Supply in December and January, coming in at just a touch over one month, while the condo market has settled into just under 2.5 months of supply, which is about average for Arlington condos, save the two years after the Amazon HQ2 announcement.

New Listing Volume in Arlington

The number of condos listed for sale in January remained high, coming in 66.7% higher than January 2020. The number of single-family homes listed for sale remained stable, with an increase of just 11.9% over January 2020.

Dramatic Shift in Fairfax and Loudoun

If you think buying a house in Arlington is difficult, just try buying a house in Fairfax or Loudoun County, where single-family Months of Supply has dropped below one month to two to three weeks! This represents a much bigger shift in market conditions than what we’ve experienced in Arlington, which has been more competitive for longer.

Northern Virginia Condo Supply

All three Northern Virginia counties charted below (Arlington, Fairfax and Loudoun) have seen a spike in condo supply over the last 6-plus months, but condo absorption has actually increased by enough in Loudoun County to not only offset the increased supply but to also cause Months of Supply to drop to 10-plus year lows of two weeks. Arlington County and Fairfax County have gone the other direction, with significantly higher Months of Supply.

If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: How has COVID-19 impacted Arlington’s rental market?

Answer: Recent articles have shed light onto just how much COVID-19 has hurt the apartment rental market in the D.C. metro area, including an article about rents dropping by 14% in Arlington and an article on rents in D.C.’s Class-A high-rise buildings dropping approximately 18%.

I have certainly experienced the difficult rental market in the past 10 months with clients who have struggled to find new tenants for their condos for months, even after significant price reductions. In some buildings, there are double-digit numbers of condos being offered for rent, with little interest.

I have also spoken to many condo owners who are turning to selling units after months of vacancy trying to rent them out, which is one of the reasons for last year’s explosion in condos listed for sale.

I took a look at last year’s rental market for apartments, townhouses and single-family homes and compared it the previous four years to see how each sub-market performed. There’s a summary of key findings below and a detailed data table to follow.

Note that this only includes properties in Arlington that were rented through Bright MLS. Most commercial rental buildings do not use the MLS and not every homeowner with an investment property rents through the MLS, but the number of properties rented through the MLS is enough to make this statistically reliable data.

Key Findings

  • Condo rentals dropped in price for studios (-10.2%), one-bedrooms (-4%) and two-bedrooms (-1%). If you remove January and February (pre-COVID) listings, the price drops increase further. I suspect 2021 will see an even larger drop in rental prices because many owners are still trying to find a tenant.
  • The average time to rent a unit increased by 50% to two months, and tenants negotiated significantly further below the asking price than ever before.
  • Two-bedroom units struggled, but not nearly as much as studios and one-bedrooms units, likely because the second bedroom provides a much-needed home office.
  • COVID-19 had the opposite effect on single-family and townhouse rentals with prices increasing to all-time highs, homes renting faster than ever before and owners securing prices closer to their asking price than ever before.
  • Rentals of small two- and three-bedroom houses and large four-bedroom townhouses were in the most demand, with average days on market just 3.5 weeks and some of the highest rental price to asking price ratios of any property type.
  • I expect single-family and townhouse rentals to have an even better 2021 (from the perspective of the homeowner) as people continue trying to get more space, avoid common living and find buying those homes to be cost-prohibitive and/or too difficult (competitive).

If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: How accurate are the County’s tax assessments when it comes to determining the market value of a home?

Answer: Arlington’s property tax rate will remain unchanged in 2021 at just over 1%, but many homeowners will pay more in property taxes because of higher assessed values from the County. For those with plans to sell in the near future, the rapid appreciation of Arlington real estate values is a good thing, but for those with no plans to sell, appreciation simply means a higher annual tax bill.

If you’re upset by recent increases in your home’s assessed value, just know that you’re most likely getting a significant break compared to your home’s actual market value. Homes that sold in 2020 sold for an average of 18.2% (14.9% median) more than their most recent assessed value by the County. Last year, the average difference was 14.2% and the year before it was just 7.6%.

If County assessments were representative of actual market values, the average Arlington homeowner would pay just over $1,100 more per year in property taxes. So don’t forget to send the Department of Real Estate Assessments a Christmas card this year for such generous valuations!

Only 5.9% of homes sold for less than their most recent assessed value. On the other end of the spectrum, 6% of homes sold for 38% or more over their most recent assessed value.

Let’s take a look at the data!

If you believe that the County’s assessment of your home’s value is too high, you have the right to appeal the assessed value, but that must be done by March 1. Here are the key steps in appealing your assessment:

Reminder: Your first appeal with the Department of Real Estate Assessments must be filed by March 1.

  • Step 1: Call 703-228-3920 for information on how your assessment was determined.
  • Step 2: File your appeal online here (first level).
  • Step 3: An assessor will visit your home and you can provide relevant info to make your case.
  • Step 4: If you’re not satisfied with the decision or have not received written notice by April 1, file your second appeal with the Board of Equalization online here (second level) by April 15.
  • Step 5: If you’re not satisfied with the decision, your final option for appeal is with the Circuit Court, which will likely require you to hire an attorney.

If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: How did Arlington’s condo market perform in 2020?

Answer: I ended up writing a lot about the condo market during the second half of 2020 because of the historically high number of units listed for sale from July to November, falling demand and falling market values (compared to the first half of the year). However, there were slightly positive signs in the last month of 2020 and early weeks of 2021 that the negative trends are reversing. Despite a second half that looked very different from the previous three years, 2020 overall was still a strong market for condos in Arlington. Let’s take a look at how things played out…

Prices Up, Volume Down, Pace Mostly Unchanged…

The average and median price of condos increased by 4.2% and 6.3%, respectively, a strong performance but a bit short of the nearly 8% growth in 2019. I wouldn’t be surprised to see no appreciation or slightly negative appreciation in 2021 as a result of changing housing priorities from COVID-19.

Despite the late surge of condos listed for sale, the number of condos actually sold in 2020 dropped 8.3% from 2019 and 19.3% compared to 2018.

The speed of the market remained relatively unchanged, with average days on market staying put at seven days and median days on market decreasing slightly from 19 days to 18.4 days. However, my preferred “speed” metric, the percentage of units selling within one week, dropped to 48% in 2020 from 52% in 2019 — but it’s still well above 29% from 2018.

Six Interesting Charts

Below, I put together a series of charts to visualize how the Arlington condo market performed in 2020 and how that performance compares to the 2015 to 2019 markets.

Read More

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: How did Arlington’s single-family housing market perform in 2020?

Answer: Despite the pandemic, the single-family housing market produced strong growth locally and nationally, primarily due to interest rates setting record lows throughout the year and a sharp change in housing criteria due to ongoing work/school-from-home demands. While Arlington experienced strong growth, less expensive markets farther from D.C. saw sharp increases in demand and explosive growth.

More Expensive…

In Arlington, the average and median price for a single-family home increased by 4.9% and 5.7%, respectively, after similar increases in 2019. The growth showed up in all ends of the market, including Arlington’s most expensive homes, with another record-shattering year for the number of $2 million to $3 million homes sold. Only 17% of single-family homes sold for less than $800,000 and about half of those were tear-downs or required major renovations.

Volume Still Down…

Despite a very slow rollout of homes for sale in the first half of the year due to lockdown measures and pandemic fears, market volume caught up quickly in the second half of the year, ending up with 13 more homes sold in 2020 than in 2019, but still approximately 10% lower than 2015 to 2018.

Faster Pace Sales…

Average and median days on market dropped for the fifth year in a row to 7 and 22.2 days, respectively, and the percentage of homes selling in the first week increased for the fifth year in a row, hitting the 50% mark in 2020. The average and median price for a home purchase within the first week on the market was 1.1% and 2% over the asking price, respectively. The takeaway? If you’re searching for a home, be prepared to act quickly and pay above the asking price for something new-to-market.

Six Interesting Charts

Below, I put together a series of charts to visualize how the Arlington housing market performed in 2020 and how that performance compares to the 2015 to 2019 markets.

Read More

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: When should I expect more homes to be put on the market for sale?

Answer: 2020 was an unusual year for housing inventory because we saw so little inventory come out during the spring, when the pace of new listings peaks, and an explosion of listings, especially condos, from late summer through the holidays. You can check out column I wrote that visualizes how unusual 2020 was for housing inventory in Arlington. Even though my analysis in this column and previous columns focuses on Arlington, similar patterns show up and can be applied across the D.C. metro.

It is much more likely that the pace of new listings will follow a more traditional pattern this year, with the number of homes listed for sale increasing steadily from now to the spring, peaking for about mid-March to mid-May, and then dropping steadily through the rest of the year, with a brief post-Labor Day spike.

Weekly Pace of Listings, by Housing Type

I’ve always shared and seen monthly breakdowns of listing inventory, so I thought it would be interesting to break it down a bit further into a weekly chart and see if there’s a noticeable difference in the seasonal pace of new listings of single-family homes/townhouses and condos.

The following chart does just that and pulls data from the five years spanning 2015 to 2019. (I threw out 2020 because it’s an anomaly.) The weekly percentages represent that week’s share of total annual listings. Note that the data for the first and last weeks of the year aren’t always full weeks because of how Excel calculates weeks.

As it turns out, the pace of listing inventory for single-family homes/townhouses and condos is nearly identical throughout the year, aside from a slightly higher pace for single-family homes and townhomes in the middle of the spring and a slightly lower pace for single-family homes and townhomes during the dog days of summer.

What can buyers looking for a home in 2021 take away from this chart? You can expect a significant increase in listings beginning around mid-February, buckle up for the most options in April and May, plan your vacations in July and August, look-out for the post-Labor Day surge, and hopefully you’ve found your dream home by the holidays!

Weekly Pace of Listings, by Year

The pace of new listings remains pretty consistent year-after-year, as shown by the chart below. There were only a handful of weeks with unusually low listing activity, compared to previous years. I’m guessing there was major weather activity during those weeks that caused some homeowners to delay or accelerate their listings by a week or two to avoid the drag of bad weather.

The consistency you see in the five-year chart below is also reflected in longer (10- and 15-year) charts, but those get a little too messy for display.

Weekly Pace of Listings and Contracts

The pace of listing inventory and contract activity is highly correlated. The “chicken or the egg” question is whether more/less listing activity drives more/less contract activity (demand), or does demand dictate listing activity, or do buyers and sellers just have similar patterns of behavior and thus the pace of supply and demand naturally correlate?

I think that it’s mostly due to No. 3, a natural correlation of behavior patterns that cause the pace of supply and demand to move in tandem. This is also supported by data, like the new-listing-to-new-pending ratios not being very seasonal.

Using the chart below, one could even make the argument that the best time to list a property for sale is the last two to three months of the year, when the pace of contract activity (demand) consistently exceeds new listings (competition). However, I’ve analyzed “success metrics” like days on market and sale-to-ask-price ratio based on the month a property is listed and overwhelmingly found that February to May/June produce the most favorable results for sellers.

I hope these charts were interesting and helpful to you! If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: Do you expect mortgage rates to increase in 2021?

Answer: Happy new year everybody! Historically low mortgage rates in 2020 were one of a few factors that drove real estate prices up across the country (except in the condo market). This time last year, the Mortgage Bankers Association and Freddie Mac each predicted that rates would remain near 2019 levels through 2021, with an average 30-year fixed rate hovering around 3.7% to 3.8% through that period.

As it turns out, rates averaged about a full percent less than those projections. Rates fell consistently throughout the year, except for a brief but sharp increase in mid-March when markets went crazy with the first news of COVID-related shutdowns, until the Fed stepped in with liquidity.

Below are some charts from Freddie Mac showing average mortgage rates over the last 50, 10 and one year.

Average Mortgage Rates Since 1971

Average Mortgage Rates Since 2010

Average Mortgage Rates in 2020

Rates in 2021+

The Mortgage Bankers Association and Freddie Mac each predict that 30-year fixed rates will increase slightly in 2021 and hover around 3% to 3.2% in 2021. Beyond 2021, the Mortgage Bankers Association sees rates averaging 3.6% in 2022 and 4.1% in 2023.

An increase to 4% or higher mortgage rates will likely cause the rapid appreciation we’ve seen over the last couple of years to slow down, but I don’t think it will lead to a pull-back in prices unless it is combined with a migration from the DC Metro due to major changes in telework policy.

If you’re considering purchasing in 2021, I wrote a column in 2019 about my favorite mortgage programs that you might find helpful. If there’s anything I can do to help you prepare for a purchase, don’t hesitate to email me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Happy holidays to you and yours! I hope you are finding new ways to enjoy the season and connect with family and friends this year. I’m going to keep my final post of 2020 light and take a look at the most expensive sales in the DMV in 2020, something we all enjoy doing!

Despite its Missing Ultra High-End Market [sarcasm], Arlington boasts the most expensive sale in the DMV in 2020, by a LOT, with the sale of a massive estate along the Potomac River for $45 million. This price tag earns the new owner over 31,000 square feet of living space, 3.2 acres, a 30-car garage and gorgeous views of the Potomac River.

Listing and photo by Russell Firestone, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty (409 Chain Bridge Road, Arlington)

Top 5 Most Expensive Sales in Arlington

Arlington’s five most expensive sales in 2020 include the region-leading $45 million sale mentioned above and four sales ranging from $2.88 million to $3.35 million, including two condos in Rosslyn’s iconic Turnberry Tower.

Listing and photo by Nancy Taylor Bubes, Washington Fine Properties (1881 N. Nash Street #2301, Arlington)

Top 5 Most Expensive Sales in Alexandria

Alexandria’s five most expensive sales in 2020 include four homes in Alexandria’s new waterfront condo and townhouse community, Robinson Landing, and one incredibly unique single-family home on ¼ acre in the heart of Old Town (pictured below).

Listing and photo by MaryEllen Rotondo, McEnearney Associates (217 S. Fairfax Street, Alexandria)

Top 5 Most Expensive Homes in Fairfax County

Fairfax County’s five most expensive sales in 2020 include three homes in Great Falls and two homes in McLean ranging from $5.6 million to $24 million. Pictured below is what $7 million gets you in Great Falls — over 20,000 square feet, 5 acres, and stunning landscape and architectural design.

Listing and photo by Piper Yerks, Washington Fine Properties (576 Innsbruck Avenue, Great Falls)

Top 5 Most Expensive Homes in Loudoun County

Loudoun County’s five most expensive sales in 2020 include sales ranging from $3.75 million to $16 million. At a price tag of $16 million, you could have secured a 1,550-plus acre cattle farm in Upperville, surrounded by vineyards and a short drive to Middleburg.

Listing and photo by Kathryn Harrell, Washington Fine Properties (33542 Newstead Lane, Upperville)

Top 5 Most Expensive Homes in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C.’s five most expensive sales in 2020 range from $6.1 million to $17.75 million, with Georgetown commanding four of those sales. Want a 10,000-square-foot home with a detached two-car garage and 6/10th of an acre in Georgetown? That’ll run you $17.75 million in 2020.

Listing and photo by Michael Rankin, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty (1405 34th Street NW, Washington D.C.)

Read More

0 Comments

This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based realtor and Arlington resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns. Enjoy!

Question: Can you provide an update on how the condo market is doing?

Answer: Arlington’s condo market began shifting in favor of buyers this summer, after two years of a very strong seller’s market, when historical numbers of condos began hitting the market at the same time demand subsided. I’ve written about these changes four times since (falling values, visualizing high inventory, first signs of a trend, and first signs of a shift).

November Might Be a Turning Point

For the first time since June, we’ve seen a reduction in the Months of Supply (MoS) of Arlington condos. Months of Supply is a great measure of supply and demand (lower MoS = stronger market with higher demand and less inventory).

While the reduction in MoS is slight, it’s a positive sign nonetheless that the market is either closer to finding its level again or may soon show signs of strengthening. However, one month, particularly a winter month, is not enough to establish any real change, we will need to see what the next three to six months bear.

Multiple Key Indicators Show Positive Signs

My hope for a settling or strengthening of the condo market is not solely based on one metric. There are other key metrics that suggest November may be the first month of a settling or strengthening condo market.

Absorption Rate (Figure 2), a measure of demand, increased ever-so-slightly in November, the first increase since May, albeit still down nearly 68% from the December 2019 Absorption Rate.

The number of condos for sale during November decreased for the first time since May (Figure 3), albeit slightly. The better news, however, is that the decrease in total condo inventory doesn’t seem to be caused by frustrated sellers pulling their condos off the market, rather due to promising contract activity (Figure 4), which was up 41% year-over-year in November.

Looking Ahead, Eyes on March to May

Over the next few months, I’ll be looking closely at whether these trends (stronger demand, falling inventory) continue, find a level or revert back to what we’ve seen since this summer. I’ll be particularly interested in what year-over-non-COVID-year numbers look like and if we settle into normal spring activity for inventory and demand.

For example, while the charts above are positive indicators for the condo market, Figure 5 shows just how much inventory (new listings) is still coming onto the market, with November generating nearly 79% more condo listings in 2020 than in 2019, but only a 41% increase in contract activity.

I think March to May 2021 are going to be very interesting months, statistically speaking, and will be excellent indicators of what the market might look like for the next few years, until the next major market event (e.g. Great Recession, Amazon HQ2, COVID). I think/hope that by then, we will also have a better understanding of how the Federal Government and private companies will address teleworking beyond COVID and thus whether commute time will be prioritized differently by buyers.

If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at [email protected].

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to [email protected]. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at www.EliResidential.com. Call me directly at 703-539-2529.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. 703-390-9460.

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list