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by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 11:25 pm 4,733 0

A police chase that started in D.C. ended with a wreck at a busy Crystal City intersection.

U.S. Park Police had chased the car from D.C. to Crystal City when, just before 8:30 p.m., it was broadsided by a Jeep at the intersection of Jefferson Davis Highway and 23rd Street S. The fleeing vehicle slammed into a gas pump at the Exxon station at the southwest corner of the intersection. Three men ran from the car, with one dropping a gun on the ground in the process.

The wreck caused a fuel spill but did not cause a fire. An occupant of the Jeep was transported to George Washington University Hospital with serious injuries, according to Arlington County Fire Department Battalion Chief Daniel Fitch.

While the suspects were fleeing, Fitch said, a U.S. Park Police offer was involved in a separate crash at Jefferson Davis Highway and 20th Street. The officer was injured and transported to Virginia Hospital Center.

A third accident, possibly caused by a driver distracted by the subsequent police search for the suspects, occurred at 25th Street and S. Fern Street. No injuries were reported in that crash.

According to NBC 4, two of the three suspects have been apprehended, while one remains at large. A police helicopter was brought in to help search for the suspects.

by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 3:45 pm 2,427 0

Police are investigating a four-vehicle crash in East Falls Church.

The crash happened around 3:00 p.m. at the intersection of Lee Highway and Sycamore Street. A witness told ARLnow.com that the accident was caused when one of the drivers tried to make an ill-advised U-turn. Police on the scene tell us he’s being charged with reckless driving.

A technical rescue crew responded to the scene to help extricate a driver trapped in their vehicle after the wreck. The jaws of life were used to remove the car’s doors.

Two people were hurt and transported to Virginia Hospital Center as a result of the accident.

Investigators are taking photos of the scene. Lee Highway is currently open, but the northbound lanes of Sycamore Street are still blocked. Drivers should expect delays in the area.

by Ethan Rothstein — July 12, 2013 at 2:25 pm 1,716 0

A new urgent care facility is opening in Ballston next week.

The Inova Urgent Care and Inova Medical Group primary care offices will open for business Monday, July 15, in their new offices at 1005 N. Glebe Road in Ballston.

The urgent care facility is on the first floor of the building — serving patients for work-related injuries, allergic reactions, broken bones and other such ailments — while the primary care service is on the fourth floor. Dr. Randi Kodroff will be the primary care physician at the facility, but the plan is to bring aboard a second doctor sometime in the future, Inova officials said.

Inova held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new facility Friday morning, attended by Rep. Jim Moran (D), Sen. Barbara Favola (D), County Board Vice Chair Jay Fisette and Board member Libby Garvey, among others. CEO of Inova Alexandria Hospital Christine Candio delivered remarks commemorating the occasion.

“It’s clear that urgent care is needed based on the density here in Ballston,” Candio said. “We’re please to be providing quality healthcare services to Arlington.”

Candio said Inova also plans to soon add sports medicine, behavioral health and OB/GYN services in the near future. She said the office is also targeting small businesses who need services such as workmen’s compensation help and employee physicals.

The urgent care facility is 5,891 square feet and has four exam rooms, two rooms for emergency injuries and a cardiac imaging room. The primary care office on the fourth floor is 2,500 square feet.

“Our slogan is meeting the patient where the patient wants to be met, and that’s here in Ballston,” said Jeffrey Carr, Inova’s growth officer. “The market requires access, value and affordability and this has all three things.”

The facility will compete with other urgent care clinics in the area, including MidAtlantic Urgent Care, Simplicity Urgent Care and Virginia Hospital Center Urgent Care.

by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 1:20 pm 1,311 0

This article was written by Audrey Batcheller

Flooding in Arlington on 9/8/11 (courtesy Brendan L.)So far this summer, Arlington has been subject to flash floods and flash flood warnings. While flash floods are obviously harmful to those who live in or are trying to navigate through a flooded area, the floods can actually be harmful to the ecology of the flooded waterway itself.

A flash flood is a weather condition defined by the National Weather Service as “a rapid and extreme flow of high water into a normally dry area, or a rapid water level rise in a stream or creek above a predetermined flood level, beginning within six hours of the causative event.” In other words, a tremendous amount of water in a short amount of time caused by thunderstorms or heavy rainfall.

These types of storms are most common in Arlington during the spring and summer months due to the weather and climate of the area, which explains why the flood threats have picked up recently.

The effects of flash floods depend on factors such as the amount of previous rainfall the area has experienced and how much rainfall can be absorbed in the area. Flash floods, therefore, affect all areas and environments differently and there’s no blanket formula to predict how a storm will affect a given area.

Part of the Mt. Vernon Trail is closed due to flooding (file photo)Aside from the potential danger presented from this type of extreme weather condition, heavy rainfall and flash floods can have negative impacts on our local streams and surrounding environments.

“When rainfall runs from developed surfaces in Arlington to local streams, it washes any nutrients on the surface into the watershed,” explains WJLA meteorologist and Arlington Public Schools high school science teacher Ryan Miller.

These nutrients can include fertilizer, pet waste, and gasoline, and when they infiltrate runoff heading towards local tributaries, they eventually end up in the Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Waterways suffer from the introduction of these pollutants which catalyze a harmful process called eutrophication.

Eutrophication occurs when algae blooms in a body of water deplete the dissolved oxygen levels in the water. This loss of oxygen creates what is referred to as anoxic water and typically results in an environment unsuitable for living organisms.

The harmful effects of eutrophication and runoff can be augmented by flash flooding, considering the abundance of water washing into local streams such as Four Mile Run or Long Branch.

(more…)

by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 11:45 am 0

Your Cheesemonger logo

Editor’s Note: This sponsored column is written by Katie Carter, cheesemonger at Arrowine (4508 Lee Highway)

On a recent trip to Manhattan, I found myself in a hairnet scrubbing my hands and arms over a knee-operated stainless steel sink. A moment later soapy, hot water rushed under my shoes. I was in the sanitary “make room” of Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, a Seattle-based producer of artisanal cheese, with Dan Utano, the head cheesemaker and Colleen Levine, author of the cheese blog, Cheese and Champagne. Dan generously gave us a tour inside New York’s most ambitious creamery and some insight into the challenges and rewards of making cheese in the country’s most populated city.

Cheese production at Beecher's in New York City (photo courtesy Colleen Levine)Every other morning, a tanker truck full of fresh, raw milk heads into the the Flat Iron district of Manhattan from two farms, Dutch Hollow and Ooms Dairy, originating just outside of Albany. After about two hours of pumping the milk into the enormous holding tank, pasteurization of the milk is underway. The milk is then pumped into large rectangular open vats where the liquid milk is slowly and carefully transformed into solid curds.

The process is slow and methodical. Each step, from acidifying the cheese with cultures to “cheddaring” (the long process of draining whey from stacked curds), is executed with exacting precision by passionate artisans. What’s special about this creamery is that anybody can watch the magic happen. The walls of this creamery are glass and everybody walking past can get a glimpse of this ancient craft.

Cheese production at Beecher's in New York City (photo courtesy Colleen Levine)Beechers creates six cheeses in this spotless, modern creamery. Though production focuses mostly on various cheddars, Dan, a former cheesemonger, recently developed Flat Iron, a young and supple washed rind cheese loosely based on Taleggio. Beecher’s Handmade Cheese is a serious name in the industry — Flagsheep, a sheep and cow’s milk blend made in their Seattle location, took the Best of Show award in last year’s American Cheese Society competition.

The logistics of city cheesemaking are tricky; production is large though not enormous. At the time of my visit, they were only up to half capacity. But how does the creamery handle issues such as disposal of whey, a nutritious by-product of cheesemaking? Dan explained that they wanted to comply with the city’s regulations by not simply dumping thousands of pounds of whey each day into the city’s sewers. Their solution? Give it back to the farmers. The two farms use the whey for feed and fertilizer. A perfectly sustainable solution.

On your next visit to New York, consider stopping by Beecher’s Handmade Cheese. In addition to the creamery, they have a well stocked cheese counter and a comfortable restaurant.

Wondering how I did in the Cheesemonger Invitational? Your Cheesemonger won third place! I dedicate this great honor to Aldo Molina, my dear friend and fellow cheesemonger who passed away last year.

Katie Carter is Arlington’s first and only ACS Certified Cheese Professional. She has worked in the cheese industry for ten years as a cheesemaker, cheesemonger, and educator. She can be found on Twitter @AfinaCheeseThe views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

Photos by Colleen Levine

by Ethan Rothstein — July 12, 2013 at 10:30 am 1,670 0

A county-owned pickup truck struck a pedestrian in Crystal CityThe pedestrian who was struck by a county employee in a pickup truck in Crystal City last week remains in the hospital with serious leg and back injuries.

The victim, a Marine Corps Veteran, was struck by a Ford F-350 driven by Linwood Knight, a lift operator for the Department of Environmental Services, police said. According to county Director of Human Resources Marcy Foster, Knight is still employed by the county. The county does not disclose disciplinary action.

Knight was charged at the scene with failure to yield to a pedestrian, Arlington County Police Department spokesman Lt. Mike Watson said. The investigation has concluded and no other charges are pending.

“Unless it’s a death or a serious injury, we don’t call for a criminal investigation,” Watson said.

The victim’s attorney, Bruce Deming, declined to comment on what his client’s next legal steps will be, but he is gathering information in the course of his own investigation. He said the victim’s first name is Carmen, but couldn’t reveal her last name.

Deming posted twice in the comments section of the original article on ARLnow.com requesting those claiming they were at the scene when the accident occurred contact him. He said the last name Cole, which was posted in the comments section, is incorrect.

“She has a terrific attitude and she’s fighting hard,” Deming said, confirming Friday morning that she was still hospitalized. “She’s suffered very significant injuries.”

by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 9:30 am 4,312 0

Sharknado screen grab (courtesy @rickolivieri)(Updated at 9:55 a.m.) Last night, the campy made-for-TV movie Sharknado took Twitter by storm.

The low-budget film, which aired on the SyFy network, stars Tara Reid (American Pie), Ian Ziering (Beverly Hills, 90210) and John Heard (Home Alone). It seems that Arlington also played a bit part.

In one portion of the film, a scene clearly shows an Arlington police cruiser and fire engine.

At publication time, an Arlington police spokesman couldn’t be reached to confirm whether the shot was filmed exclusively for the movie or if it was simply stock footage appropriated by the producers.

Several Arlington notables were active on Twitter during the film. Among them: NBC News correspondent and Arlington resident Chuck Todd, Del. Alfonso Lopez and Del. Rob Krupicka.

Photo courtesy @rickolivieri


by ARLnow.com — July 12, 2013 at 8:00 am 580 0

Black helicopter near Rosslyn (Flickr pool photo by John Sonderman)

Local History Being Digitized at Library — The Center for Local History, the new name for the Virginia Room at Arlington Central Library, is making a push to digitize historic photos and documents submitted by residents. The library’s own collection of historic documents is also being digitized. [Washington Post]

Arlington Dems Decamp for Competitive Races — Arlington Democrats, secure in the near-certainty that local races will go their way, are planning to help out in other, more competitive races around Northern Virginia. Among the help being offered by local Democrats is on-the-ground support and phone banking. [Sun Gazette]

Tour de France Viewing for a Good Cause — Arlington Cinema and Drafthouse (2903 Columbia Pike) will host a viewing party for the critical Stage 15 of the Tour de France on Sunday. The cyclists’ mountainous climb will be projected on the big screen starting at 7:00 p.m. Tickets to the event is free, but attendees are encouraged to donate to Companions for Heroes, which provides companion dogs that were rescued from shelters to military veterans. [Rouleurville]

Flickr pool photo by John Sonderman

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