Pacers Invites Runners to Pair Whiskey With Girl Scout Cookies at Event Next Week

An event in Clarendon next week invites runners to wash down Girl Scout cookies with whiskey.

Pacers Running, located at 3100 Clarendon Blvd, is hosting a social run around the neighborhood this coming Tuesday (March 5) with some special treats available at the end.

The attraction of the event is nominally a chance for runners to try out ON Running’s “CloudSwift” shoes. But the unusual twist comes after the run is over.

Representatives from Pittsburgh-based distillery Wigle Whiskey will be on hand after the event sampling some of its liquor offerings. And with each new spirit, they’ll recommend a Girl Scout cookie to pair with it.

“It’s an unbeatable combination,” promises a Facebook page describing the event.

The run will start at the Pacers shop at 7 p.m. All running paces are welcome.

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Arlington’s ‘Habitual Drunkards:’ Prosecutors Enforce a Controversial Law Impacting the Homeless

Over the last few years, Arlington police and prosecutors have embraced a controversial tactic to deal with people who are frequently drunk in public — but most county residents don’t even know it exists.

The unusual process, known as “interdiction,” allows county prosecutors to ask a judge to declare someone a “habitual drunkard” if they’ve committed several alcohol-related offenses. That designation means these “drunkards” can be charged with a misdemeanor and jailed for up to a year if they’re found so much as buying or drinking alcohol again.

Virginia and Utah are the only states in the entire country with this sort of law on the books; the commonwealth’s statute passed just before the turn of the 20th century.

Accordingly, interdictions are far from commonplace in the county — prosecutors estimate that they’ve only interdicted 12 people dating back to September 2015, and that just 50 people around Arlington are currently deemed “drunkards.”

But the latter figure is the third highest for any locality across the entire state, according to statistics compiled by the Charlottesville-based Legal Aid Justice Center. Only Virginia Beach and Roanoke have more interdicted people, with 616 and 140 respectively.

And Arlington’s place on that list disturbs attorneys and advocates alike, given the brewing controversy over interdictions.

Commonwealth’s Attorney Theo Stamos, the county’s top prosecutor, dubs interdiction a “tool of last resort,” helping officers force people who are constantly drunk to finally get help. Yet critics believe it has a massively disproportionate impact on the homeless, and that police use it as a cudgel against people living on the streets who are struggling with substance abuse issues.

Others still argue that it robs interdicted people of due process — prosecutors request the “drunkard” designation in a civil hearing rather than a criminal one, meaning that even indigent defendants aren’t entitled to have an attorney present for the proceedings.

A legal challenge to the law on those grounds is currently working its way through federal court, while an Arlington public defender-turned-state lawmaker is working to repeal the statute in this year’s General Assembly session.

Yet, as those efforts proceed, some legal observers can’t understand why county police and prosecutors still pursue interdictions at all, given their stated commitment to other kinds of criminal justice reform.

“It’s inappropriate, unfair, and it doesn’t work,” Brad Haywood, Arlington’s chief public defender, told ARLnow. “In over 15 years as an attorney, I’ve served as a public defender in two of the few jurisdictions that still actively enforce this law. While I can think of many who owe their sobriety to residential alcohol treatment, intensive outpatient services and the expertise and compassion of mental health professionals, I can’t think of anyone who owes their sobriety to interdiction. Not a single person.”

Criminalizing the homeless, or a ‘last resort’ for addicts?

To Haywood, who has strongly criticized Stamos in the past, interdiction effectively criminalizes homelessness. After all, he points out that the law “only targets people who possess or drink alcohol while visible to others,” which essentially leaves just the homeless, many of whom turn to alcohol to make it through the day or are gripped by addiction.

“They live their entire lives in public,” Haywood said. “If they have alcohol, drink it, or are drunk, they will be seen, and under this statute, they will be arrested.”

Of course, he believes there are other “problem drinkers” around the county. As he puts it: “I read ARLnow, I know what happens on the Wilson Boulevard corridor on weekends.”

But he argues police have embraced a completely different strategy for those cases, choosing to work with popular bars to encourage stronger partnerships and prevent arrests, even though the circumstances are similar.

“If the goal of interdiction is to curb problem drinking generally, and to be equitable about it, then I’d think the Arlington bar scene would receive some attention,” Haywood said. “It hasn’t, obviously, and I’m not suggesting it should, but if it had, you’d have certainly have heard about it by now. “

However, law enforcement officials note that they’re not using interdictions indiscriminately, or targeting all homeless people. County police spokeswoman Ashley Savage says officers ask for interdictions “only in the most significant cases, where public safety resources are utilized for the same individual on a [recurring] basis.”

She adds that police take into consideration whether people are committing “criminal violations while intoxicated” as well as “concerns for the safety of the individual or those around them” in making such a decision.

“The goal is not to wantonly incarcerate people,” Stamos said. “A lot of these people are not mindful of their surroundings and can be victimized… and it’s a safety concern. We see pedestrian accidents every single day, and in some cases it’s because people are wandering into the street.”

Stamos says that, in many cases, her office only interdicts people after family and friends urge some sort of drastic step to force them to get help.

For instance, Stamos says prosecutors have interdicted four people since July 2017 — and those people had an average of 19 prosecutions each for alcohol-related offenses before being declared a “drunkard.” Prosecutors pursued a high of 37 cases against one person; the person with the smallest total had been prosecuted four times, and even then they’d been drunk during 35 different encounters with county medics over a two-year period.

“This is absolutely a last resort to hook them up with services,” Stamos said. “It’s a deprivation of liberty, but it’s done with the purpose of getting these people in jail, and getting them sober.”

It may not be a perfect solution, but county officials say they work hard to find people with substance abuse issues once they’re in jail, then get them help.

Kelly Nieman, who works on the county’s forensic jail diversion team, says Arlington has been a leader across the state in finding ways to treat inmates’ mental health issues or substance abuse problems, which are often interconnected. She hopes that helps stop people from “revolving in and out of the system.”

“We have a model to intercept individuals at junctions when they butt up against the legal system,” Nieman said. “We screen people for services and develop a release plan to get them back into the community.”

Stamos says she’d love to have another way to “induce compliance” with a treatment program for homeless addicts, but she just doesn’t see one available to her prosecutors.

“Give us another tool, and we’ll use it,” Stamos said. “If you do away with this statute, give us more money for treatment services.”

While he acknowledges that the county does good work in this area, Haywood pushes back against the notion that workers at the county jail should be “front-line caretakers for the chronically mentally ill, which is what most interdicted people actually are.” He’d rather police connect the homeless to dedicated treatment services, rather than simply sending them to jail.

“That’s a job for mental health professionals, in settings appropriate to the treatment of addiction and serious mental illness,” Haywood said. “If what we want is to help the most destitute, vulnerable people in our community, we should ensure they have access to intensive mental health and substance abuse treatment services, and stop pretending we’re making the situation better by locking sick people away so the public can’t see them.”

Challenging the process

Elaine Poon, the managing attorney for the Legal Aid Justice Center, also believes that the very manner in which the statute is written makes the process punitive, not rehabilitative. Her group is leading a legal challenge to the law, arguing that interdictions create a vicious cycle for people declared “drunkards.”

Poon notes that police can — and do — pursue all manner of charges against people who are drunk in public. What sets interdictions apart is that people designated as “drunkards” can be prosecuted for simply drinking alcohol or having it in their possession, which she believes help police wrack up charge after charge against the same people.

According to Stamos’ own statistics, the 12 people her office have interdicted since 2015 have subsequently been prosecuted an average of three times each for possessing alcohol or appearing drunk in public. Poon believes this shows how interdicting someone can simply compound the time they spend in jail, criminalizing people “just for being who they are: a homeless person on the street.”

Poon feels this is all the more disturbing because many people who are declared “drunkards” don’t understand the process, and don’t have legal representation at the hearing deciding whether they’ll be interdicted in the first place. Most homeless people rely on the service of court-appointed public defenders, as they can’t afford their own lawyers, but the civil nature of the interdiction proceedings means that a judge is not required to assign them counsel.

Stamos says her prosecutors go to great lengths to find people set for an interdiction hearing, and get them to a sign paperwork acknowledging they’re aware of when they can come to court.

But Poon points out that many of her clients easily lose any forms they’ve been given by police — they don’t have homes, after all — and don’t attend the hearings, or are too mentally ill to understand a complex legal matter.

Jennifer Carroll Foy, a public defender in Arlington, says she’s often come to court and made such arguments to a judge about her interdicted clients. But her protests are commonly dismissed as a “collateral attack” on a civil case — even though that case has a direct impact on the charges her clients are facing.

“It may be a civil process, but there are criminal ramifications,” Foy said. “If there’s a possibility you’ll go to jail, I absolutely believe an attorney should be there.”

Stamos says her hands are tied by the statute in this case, arguing that public defenders “have no role” under the law in these interdiction cases.

“Their frustration shouldn’t be with my office, it should be with the system,” Stamos said.

Changing the law

Foy is in a unique position to address such displeasure with the law; she doubles as a state delegate representing parts of Prince William and Stafford counties, and has introduced legislation to repeal the “habitual drunkard” statute this year for a second time in a row.

Her bill died quickly in a subcommittee last year, but she’s more optimistic this time around, now that she’s worked to raise awareness about the issue.

“The most difficult part is educating people about it, because they don’t even know this law exists,” said Foy, a Democrat representing the House of Delegates’ 2nd District. “I hope it picks up a lot more traction this time.”

Though Democrats have a bit more clout in Richmond after a wave election in 2017, the party is still in the minority in both chambers of the General Assembly. That means Foy will face an uphill battle in getting anything passed, at least for now.

Poon is hopeful that the courts could provide some relief instead. A three-judge panel on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the case last August, but Poon’s organization is appealing the ruling to the full court, which could have the final say on the law’s constitutionality.

However, she says it’s “a mystery” when, or if, the court will agree to take the case.

In the meantime, interdictions in Arlington continue. County police referred two more people to Stamos’ prosecutors to be designated as “drunkards” just last fall.

“We have to do better when it comes to how we help the most vulnerable class of citizen in this state,” Foy said. “We’re not doing a very good job right now.”

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Police Roll Out Pink BMW to Fight Drunk Driving in Arlington

The Arlington County Police Department revealed a new tool today (Monday) to discourage drunk driving as the region gears up to celebrate the Fourth of July: a bright pink BMW.

The “SoberRide Vehicle,” developed in partnership with the Washington Regional Alcohol Program and ride-hailing service Lyft, is a redesigned 2004 BMW 330ci, seized following a drug conviction. Wrapped partially in eye-catching pink, courtesy of Lyft, the vehicle will be on display at community events and areas with nightlife to remind Arlington residents not to drive under the influence.

The vehicle complements the Washington Regional Alcohol Program’s SoberRide campaign, which will offer up to 1,500 free Lyft rides on Independence Day.

Riders will be able to request a free ride home worth up to $15 from 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. by using a Lyft promo code that will be posted to the SoberRide website 5 p.m. Wednesday.

WRAP’s SoberRide program has previously provided free rides home to area residents on holidays like St. Patrick’s DayCinco de Mayo and Halloween. Last year, 513 people in the Washington metropolitan area used the Independence Day SoberRide promotion, according to WRAP president Kurt Erickson.

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Construction on New Clarendon Japanese Restaurant Underway

(Updated at 2:15 p.m.) A Japanese chain restaurant may be a few steps closer to opening its doors in Clarendon.

Interior work has finally started on the restaurant, which first announced that it was “coming soon” to the former Brixx Pizza space at 1119 N. Hudson Street last May. The restaurant has an active commercial tenant buildout permit.

A application for Virginia ABC permit to serve wine and beer, meanwhile, was filed on Monday and is now pending. The permit suggests the restaurant will seat 101-150 people.

The restaurant’s interior was still in the buildout phase as of Tuesday afternoon, when a propped open front door showed construction material and unfinished fixtures within.

Gyu-Kak is a Japanese yakiniku restaurant chain with locations throughout the U.S., in addition to locations in Japan and other countries. This would be the chain’s first Virginia location, according to Gyu-Kaku’s website.

An email to Gyu-Kaku was not immediately returned, and a phone call to the number listed on a permit application had a full inbox and couldn’t accept a voicemail.

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L.A. Bar & Grill Temporarily Closed During License Renewal

Columbia Pike’s L.A. Bar & Grill has temporarily closed due to a state licensing issue.

The bar submitted its Virginia ABC license renewal application in the beginning of March, and the previous alcoholic beverage license expired at the end of March.

“We should have applied earlier, [but] hindsight is 20/20,” said Stephen Hubbard, the bar’s general manager.

The process is ongoing, and Hubbard anticipates that it will take “at least a couple of weeks,” though he isn’t sure.

In the meantime, the bar is taking advantage of the license renewal period and “doing some facelifting” in the form of painting and other tidying up efforts.

Back in 2016, L.A. Bar & Grill, at 2530 Columbia Pike, was ranked among UpOut’s top ten “ridiculously cool” D.C.-area dive bars.

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L.A. Bar & Grill Temporarily Closed During License Renewal

Columbia Pike’s L.A. Bar & Grill has temporarily closed due to a state licensing issue.

The bar submitted its Virginia ABC license renewal application in the beginning of March, and the previous alcoholic beverage license expired at the end of March.

“We should have applied earlier, [but] hindsight is 20/20,” said Stephen Hubbard, the bar’s general manager.

The process is ongoing, and Hubbard anticipates that it will take “at least a couple of weeks,” though he isn’t sure.

In the meantime, the bar is taking advantage of the license renewal period and “doing some facelifting” in the form of painting and other tidying up efforts.

Back in 2016, L.A. Bar & Grill, at 2530 Columbia Pike, was ranked among UpOut’s top ten “ridiculously cool” D.C.-area dive bars.

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Chill Zone Applies To Sell Beer, Wine

Chill Zone, a Yorktown cafe, might be serving alcohol soon.

The shop recently applied for a license to sell beer and wine at its location at 2442 N. Harrison St., said Chill Zone’s manager Daniel Bui.

Pending license approval, Chill Zone will serve red and white wine, and local beer, according to Bui. Initially the coffee shop plans to serve alcohol only on Fridays and Saturdays.

Chill Zone, which just celebrated its first anniversary, currently serves bubble tea, Vietnamese coffee and its signature “volcano mango frap,” in addition to food options like wings and sandwiches.

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Police: Teens Busted for Drunken Powder Puff Football Game

Arlington County Police broke up an alcohol-fueled “powder puff” football game at Jamestown Elementary School over the weekend.

ACPD says they responded to the school grounds around 1 p.m. Saturday “for a report of 20-30 teenagers drinking.”

Upon arrival, officers “encountered numerous teenagers playing a ‘Powder puff’ football game,” according to a post from a police lieutenant on the Nextdoor social network site. “Some members of the group fled when they saw police. One student was found heavily intoxicated and required medical assistance. A small group of juveniles was detained by police. “

“Evidence of alcohol consumption was located at the scene,” the post said. “The police department will be working with county school administrators and parents to identify all involved juveniles and ensure service referrals and appropriate enforcement actions are completed.”

The lieutenant who posted the report said she “wanted to make all parents aware of [the] incident.”

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New Restaurant Marble & Rye Brings Whiskey to the Pike

A new restaurant on Columbia Pike is ready to reintroduce Arlington to whiskey.

Marble & Rye opened last week at Penrose Square (2501 Columbia Pike), near the Giant and new Starbucks. Although the restaurant has served customers for only about two weeks, the restaurant is already making a name for itself when it comes to its whiskey and ribs, said spokeswoman Sarah Lakey.

“We really want to be known as the new place for whiskey in Northern Virginia,” Lakey said.

The new whiskey bar and restaurant features a tasting room, more than 150 different whiskeys and whiskey-based cocktails, in addition to its wine and beer selection.

From strong and smokey to smooth and sweet, the staff can recommend just the right whiskey for you from their extensive list. The cocktails have also been popular among both whiskey fans and newcomers.

One of the more popular drinks is the Marble & Rye Old Fashioned, which uses a whiskey infused with orange zest and cherries. The drink is getting rave reviews, with customers saying it is one of the best they have tried. Staff members also recommend the Gold Rush, which features a pistachio sugar rim.

Beyond the drink menu, the restaurant boasts a seasonal menu, made with fresh, locally sourced ingredients. One must-try dish is the baby back ribs, which are moist and fall right off the bone. The ribs can compete with some of the best in the city, but customers are encouraged to come try for themselves.

For those who are vegetarian or gluten-free, Marble & Rye has plenty of options, which are highlighted on the menu. Vegetables, including this season’s crispy Brussel sprouts and roasted squash, are cooked in a wood fired oven, giving them a little extra flavor in the process.

To compliment the locally-inspired menu, Marble & Rye brings in wine and beer from Virginia wineries and local breweries.

The local angle extends beyond the food.  They used a local artist to paint the large backsplash mural and logo and the chandelier was done by an Arlington resident, Lakey said, adding that all furniture was made in the United States using reclaimed wood for the tables and walls.

To enhance the experience, it was important that the staff had a say on what was being presented to customers so they could stand behind it. Each server has sampled every dish, every cocktail, wine and beer, they understand where it comes from and what makes it special.

While the restaurant hopes to bring whiskey to Columbia Pike, Marble and Rye is focused on creating a dining experience and working with other Columbia Pike restaurants to make the Pike a destination.

“Our goal is to be a neighborhood place where people can relax, enjoy a great drink or sip on some whiskey, and just have a great time,” Lakey said. “We want to create an experience for everyone who walks through the door.”

Marble & Rye is open on Monday from 4-11 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Thursday from 11 a.m. to midnight, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

The preceding post was written by Heather Mongilio for ARLnow.com.

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Anti-DUI Campaign to Thank Sober Drivers in Clarendon This Weekend

This Halloween, patrons at select Arlington restaurants will be praised not for the creativity of their costumes, but for getting home safely.

Anti-DUI superhero "Soberman" in Clarendon (file photo)Designated sober drivers will be publicly recognized this Friday night by Checkpoint Strikeforce and the Washington Regional Alcohol Program (WRAP) as part of an anti-drunk driving campaign.

From 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., representatives from the campaign will be outside three Clarendon nightspots to thank designated drivers and those who choose to take public transportation, a taxi or ride sharing service home.

The three restaurants that will be reference points for the “surprise and delight” thanking events are:

  • Clarendon Ballroom at 3185 Wilson Blvd.
  • Spider Kelly’s at 3181 Wilson Blvd.
  • Don Tito at 3165 Wilson Blvd.

This year’s campaign is aimed at stopping people ages 21 to 35 from drinking and driving. According to a release, 36 percent of highway fatalities in Virginia last year were alcohol-related, and more than 40 percent of people killed in alcohol-related crashes were within the campaign’s target age range.

Festive holidays, like this weekend’s Halloween celebration, often see a spike in DUI-related incidents.

WRAP will also offer free taxi rides on Saturday through its SoberRide program.

File photo

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Crime Report: Three Busted Boosting Booze

Police car lightsA man and two boys were taken into custody after allegedly stealing alcohol from a local 7-Eleven store.

The incident happened at the 7-Eleven store on S. Carlin Springs Road across the street from Kenmore Middle School. Police say the trio entered the store late Monday night, stole some booze and shoved the clerk on their way out.

From this week’s Arlington County crime report:

ROBBERY, 150811004, unit block of S. Carlin Springs. At approximately 11:30 p.m. on August 10, two juvenile suspects and an adult suspect entered a 7-11 and stole alcohol. When confronted by a clerk they pushed him aside and fled. Richard William Shelton, 25, of Arlington VA, was arrested and charged with robbery and 6 counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor. The juveniles were released in the custody of their parents.

The rest of the crime report, after the jump.

ROBBERY, 150810047, 4200 block of N. Fairfax Drive. At approximately 6:20 p.m. on August 10, a male victim met with two suspects to sell a belt that he had posted in an ad. Officers detained the two suspects after they attempted to steal the belt and flee. Isaiah Ellis, 18, of Washington D.C., was arrested and transported to booking where the Magistrate issued warrants for Robbery and Identity Theft to Avoid Arrest. The second juvenile suspect was transported to the juvenile detention facility and a robbery petition will be obtained.

ROBBERY, 150807036, 2700 block of N. Clarendon Boulevard. At approximately 12:05 p.m. on August 7, a male subject attempted to steal a USB flash drive from the Apple Store. When confronted by loss prevention officers the suspect attempted to flee but was detained. Nathaniel H. Harris, 56, was transported to booking and a warrant was issued for Robbery and Habitual Larceny Felony. He is being held without bond.

ATTEMPTED SEXUAL ASSAULT, 150808041, 1900 block of N. Highland Street. At approximately 2:45 a.m. on August 8, a 29 year-old female victim was attacked from behind by an unknown suspect while she was walking home. The suspect placed a pillowcase over the victims face and threw her to the ground. The victim kicked the subject and screamed, causing the suspect to flee. The suspect is described as a black or dark skinned Hispanic male, approximately 5’8″-5’10” tall with an average build.

BURGLARY, 150806004, 900 block of S. 26th Street. At approximately 7:45 a.m. on August 6, a 44 year-old female victim woke up to two male suspects in her residence. The victim screamed, startling the suspects, and they fled the scene. The first suspect is described as a black male approximately 5’10” and weighing 155 lbs. He was wearing a long sleeve fitted grey shirt and blue jeans. The second suspect is described as a black male approximately 6’0″ and possibly wearing a black shirt.

ATTEMPTED BURGLARY, 150809016, 700 block of N. Abingdon Street. At approximately 5:25 a.m. on August 9, a 26 year-old female victim woke up to a Hispanic male knocking on her front door. The suspect returned the victims lost wallet and attempted to enter the residence uninvited. The suspect is described a Hispanic male in his twenties, approximately 5’7″-5’9″ tall and weighed 140-160 lbs. He was wearing an orange short sleeve collared shirt and dark denim pants at the time of the incident.

GRAND LARCENY AUTO, 150808065, 100 block of S. Old Glebe Road. At approximately 8:10 p.m. on August 8, a stolen vehicle request went out in cruisers based on a LPR hit in the area. Officers responded and found a male suspect standing outside of the stolen vehicle. Jonathan Marquis Grimes, 22, of Washington D.C., was transported to booking and taken before a Magistrate. A warrant for Grand Larceny Auto was issued and Grimes is being held without bond.

STOLEN VEHICLES

08/05/15, VA 20707M, 2011 Daix Moped, Red
4300 block of N. Henderson Road
08/03/15, VA 14761M, Longbo Moped, Blue
300 block of N. George Mason Drive
08/06/15, VA 23828M, 2008 Funway Moped, Red and White
1500 block of N. Fairfax Drive
08/07/15, VA VFV2067, 2003 Saturn Ion 4, White
5600 block of N. Wilson Boulevard
08/10/15, VA 3043P, 2008 Longbo Moped, Red
1200 block of N. Scott Street
08/11/15, VA WWN9800, 2000 Jeep Cherokee, Blue
1800 block of N. Underwood Street

08/05/15

DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150805016, 2600 block of S. Columbia Pike
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150805019, 100 block of N. Thomas Street
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150805022, 2300 block of N. Clarendon Boulevard
PETIT LARCENY, 150805030, 2300 block of S. 2nd Street
FRAUD, 150805031, 1400 block of N. Courthouse Road
GRAND LARCENY, 150805038, 1100 block of S. Hayes Street

08/06/15

DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150806003, 300 block of S. Glebe Road
GRAND LARCENY, 150806005, 5700 block of N. 15th Street
ATTEMPTED GRAND LARCENY, 150806016, 4300 block of N. 4th Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150806017, 2800 block of N. Clarendon Boulevard
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150806037, 5000 block of S. Columbia Pike
ASSAULT, 150806040, 800 block of S. Greenbrier Street

08/07/15

ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150807002, 900 block of N. Stuart Street
PETIT LARCENY, 150807007, 3100 block of N. Lee Highway
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150807004, 4400 block of S. 31st Street
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150807008, 4200 block of N. Fairfax Drive
LARCENY, 150807023, 2000 block of S. Columbia Pike
STALKING, 150807027, 100 block of N. Wayne Street
LARCENY, 150807029, 1400 block of N. Courthouse Road
CRIMINAL TRESPASSING, 150807033, 1600 block of N. Mckinley Road
LARCENY, 150807047, 100 block of S. Old Glebe Road
PETIT LARCENY, 150807051, 1000 block of S. Hayes Street
LARCENY FROM AUTO, 150807060, 1100 block of S. 16th Street
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150807063, 100 block of S. Old Glebe Road
ASSAULT BY MOB, 150807069, 900 block of S. Walter Reed Drive
DISORDERLY CONDUCT, 150807071, 100 block of S. Old Glebe Road

08/08/15

ATTEMPTED LARCENY, 150808001, 700 block of S. Courthouse Road
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150808008, 1700 block of N. George Mason Drive
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150808033, 1700 block of N. Hartford Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808035, 1100 block of S. Hayes Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808044, 1100 block of S. Hayes Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808046, 3800 block of N. 9th Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808047, 1100 block of S. Hayes Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808053, 3100 block of N. Wilson Boulevard
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150808057, 1400 block of S. Joyce Street
ID THEFT, 150808058, 1100 block of N. Highland Street
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150808063, 900 block of S. Highland Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150808066, 1000 block of S. Hayes

08/09/15

ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150809005, 2000 block of S. Langley Street
OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE, 150809008, 3000 block of N. Wilson Boulevard
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150809020, 3400 block of N. 21st Avenue
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150809021, 4100 block of S. 31st Street
LARCENY, 150809022, 1200 block of S. Fern Street
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150809023, 3600 block of N. 21st Avenue
UNLAWFUL ENTRY, 150809032, 1300 block of N. Buchanan Street
FRAUD, 150809035, 1000 block of N. Stafford Street
ASSAULT, 150809037, 4200 block of S. Campbell Avenue
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150809038, 3000 block of S. 16th Road
LARCENY FROM AUTO, 150809045, 2700 block of N. Marcey Road
IDENTITY THEFT, 150809048, 900 block of N. Interstate 395

08/10/15

PETIT LARCENY, 150810008, 1500 block of S. Fern Street
LARCENY FROM AUTO, 150810013, 4300 block of S. Columbia Pike
DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150810023, 1000 block of N. Vermont Street
PETIT LARCENY, 150810024, 2600 block of S. Columbia Pike
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150810029, 4200 block of N. Fairfax Drive
GRAND LARCENY, 150810034, 3200 block of N. Fairfax Drive
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150810042, 800 block of S. Quincy Street
LARCENY FROM AUTO, 150810044, 2800 block of N. Washington Boulevard
GRAND LARCENY, 150810048, 200 block of S. 18th Street
STRANGULATION, 150810049, 4200 block of S. Campbell Avenue
GRAND LARCENY, 150810051, 1000 block of S. Hayes Street
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150810054, 3200 block of S. 24th Street

08/11/15

DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY, 150811013, 2000 block of S. Columbia Pike
GRAFFITI, 150811020, 600 block of N. Glebe Road
VANDALISM TO AUTO, 150811024, 1900 block of N. Kent Street
FRAUD, 150811025, 1700 block of S. Taylor Street
HARASSMENT, 150811028, 2200 block of N. 19th Court
LARCENY BY FALSE PRETENSE, 150811031, 800 block of N. Randolph Street
GRAND LARCENY, 150811035, 1000 block of S. Hayes Street
CHECK FRAUD, 150811040, 900 block of S. 15th Street
ASSAULT & BATTERY, 150811042, 1200 block of N. Ft. Myer Drive
TRESPASSING, 150811044, 4100 block of S. Four Mile Run Drive

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Beer and Wine Delivery Service Launching in Arlington

Beers in a refrigerator (Updated at 4:00 p.m.) An online service that would allow people to order beer and wine to their doorstep could launch next month in Arlington.

Ultra is already available in eight cities nationwide, including D.C., where it contracts with retailers to deliver beer, wine and liquor. While Virginia’s liquor laws restrict Ultra from selling spirits, Ultra CEO Aniket Shah says his company has reached an agreement with the state Alcoholic Beverage Control Board to deliver beer and wine.

We are looking at Arlington as our first city to expand in Virginia, based on demographics, income levels and awareness for new technologies,” Shah told ARLnow.com. “We are expecting the deliveries to start first-second week of March.”

Ultra users would go to the company’s website, enter their zip code, and a list of products they can order (beer, wine, soda and mixers), delivery minimum, hours and estimated delivery time. Customers can order on-demand, which takes no more than an hour, or for more than 30 days in advance, including requests like the wine be chilled. Customers’ IDs are checked when the driver makes the delivery.

“We received huge response from people in D.C. when we launched there and we wanted to expand to Virginia as soon as possible,” Shah said. “[Virginia ABC] were very open to understanding our process and providing guidelines within which we had to operate our service in Virginia. We finally received the approval and we are actively in contact with several retailers to accept deliveries in Arlington.”

Ultra, a New York City-based company, can only sell beer and wine from stores that have delivery permits in place to do so. Shah couldn’t disclose which retailers Ultra is negotiating with because of confidentiality agreements, he said.

Shah said Ultra is the first service of its kind in Virginia, but individual retailers are already able to delivery beer and wine as long as they have an ABC license. Some restaurants, like Lost Dog Cafe, deliver beer along with food.

Shah also said he plans on initiating negotiations with the ABC Board to deliver liquor straight from ABC stores, but it’s unclear how much traction those discussions will have.

File photo

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Morning Notes

Gate left open at Lyon Village Park

Booze Delivery Service Coming to N. Va.Ultra, a web-based service that facilitates the delivery of beer, wine and liquor, is launching this week in D.C. and is planning on launching in Northern Virginia “within a couple of weeks.” Ultra promises that most orders will be delivered in 30-60 minutes. The deliveries are made by licensed stores that partner with the company. [Washington Business Journal]

Shuttleworth Releases Poll Results — Former Democratic congressional candidate Bruce Shuttleworth has shared the results of a district-wide poll his campaign conducted earlier this month. The poll shows Don Beyer well in the lead among likely voters, but it also shows a sizable group of undecided voters. Shuttleworth dropped out of the race after the poll results came in, concluding that even if he “went negative” against Beyer he could not overcome the former Va. lieutenant governor’s lead. [Blue Virginia]

Congressional Candidates to Debate — The seven remaining Democrats in the congressional race will face off tomorrow (Friday) in a debate at the Arlington County Democratic Committee meeting. The meeting starts at 7:00 p.m. at the NRECA building (4301 Wilson Blvd) and is open to the public. [InsideNova]

Arlington Issues $105 Million in Bonds — Arlington County yesterday issued $105 million in bonds at an average interest rate of 2.8 percent. The bonds will be used to fund capital contributions for Metro, Neighborhood Conservation projects, WalkArlington, BikeArlington, ConnectArlington; street paving, utility projects and Arlington Public Schools projects. The county will also save nearly $2 million thanks to refunding prior debt at a lower interest rate. [Arlington County]

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Student Leaders Attend Conference to Help Curb Teen Booze Use

Selection of beer and wine (file photo)This article was written by Audrey Batcheller

Alcohol use among Arlington teens is down, and a recent trip for a group of high school students was organized to help continue that trend.

Data from the Arlington Partnership for Children, Youth, and Families shows that the percentage of Arlington high school students that reported recently drinking alcohol decreased by eight percent from 2004 to 2010. In an effort to keep that number declining, Arlington’s READY Coalition sponsored a trip for Arlington students and their School Resource Officers — Arlington County police officers assigned to schools — to attend the 29th Annual Youth Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Project (YADAPP) conference last week.

Ten students were selected by their SRO, and two additional students were chosen by the READY Coalition, which paid the registration fee to send the group to Longwood University, in Farmville, Va., for the week.

“Each high school resource officer picked the people they thought would be good leaders in trying to get their peers to get on board with an anti-drinking and anti-drug club and to help spread the message,” said Corporal Jim Tuomey, who accompanied the students to the conference.

APS students have attended this conference before, but last week was their first appearance in over ten years.

“We decided to take a group of teens to the conference for the purpose of trying to find better ways to outreach to the high school community,” said Phillip Leverett, the Youth Outreach Coordinator for the READY Coalition.

The 2013 results of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey are still pending, but the 2011 YRBS shows that two thirds of Arlington teens do not consume alcohol on any given weekend, a surprising number considering that a decade ago teen drinking appeared to be on the rise.

Hundreds of students attend the YADAPP conference — which is presented by the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control — every year to listen to speakers and participate in workshops. Students work in teams of four and create a Strategies To Act Now (STAN) prevention plan specific to their community that they will implement upon their arrival home.

Kateri Gajadhar, a student at the conference and chair of the Teen Network Board’s Drug and Alcohol Committee, is laying the ground work for an “Above the Influence” club at Washington-Lee.

“It helped me see ideas that have worked and things that didn’t work,” said Gajadhar about YADAPP. “It was good to interact with people who are doing the same things in different places to see what we can do here to effectively expand to older age groups.”

The other teams also chose to start clubs at their schools as part of their STAN plans.

“Most teams picked homecoming week to launch their club as it’s a really popular week in the schools,” said Tuomey. “They hope to get sports teams on board and use back-to-school events to try to get more members.”

The students and chaperones alike gained valuable information from their week at Longwood.

“The conference was even educational for us, the people who deal with this all the time,” Tuomey said. Leverett said he hopes these clubs and new initiatives will help the READY Coalition be even more effective in spreading their message.

“Instead of saying ‘just say no,’ we’re more into showing students that there is an alternative,” he said.

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Morning Notes

Arlington County courthouse and police headquarters

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Metro Lines and Median Income — A new infographic shows the median income along the Washington area’s Metro lines. The highest median income among Arlington’s Metro stops was East Falls Church, at $142,486. The methodology for the infographic is unclear — a median income of $113,567 was listed for Arlington National Cemetery. [Urban Turf]

Arlington Among the Highest-Earning Cities — Arlington has placed 16th on a list of cities and suburbs with the highest percentage of $100,000+ household incomes. In Arlington 50.3 percent of households earn more than $100K, according to census data. [Nerd Wallet]

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