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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

The New York Times Magazine devoted an entire issue to Losing Earth: A Recent History, Nathaniel Rich’s groundbreaking chronicle which became an instant journalistic phenomenon — the subject of international news coverage and editorials.

Arlington Public Library invites you to join an online conversation between the novelist and essayist and Library Director Diane Kresh.

The event is supported by EcoAction Arlington, a County program which also has been a community partner for Arlington Art Truck projects rooted in issues of sustainability, will share tips and resources during the YouTube premiere.

About the Book

By 1979, we knew nearly everything we understand today about climate change — including how to stop it. Over the next decade, a handful of scientists, politicians and strategists, led by two unlikely heroes, risked their careers in a desperate, escalating campaign to convince the world to act before it was too late. Losing Earth is their story, and ours. In its emphasis on the lives of the people who grappled with the great existential threat of our age, it made vivid the moral dimensions of our shared plight. Now expanded into book form, Losing Earth tells the human story of climate change in even richer, more intimate terms.

About the Author

Nathaniel Rich is the author of Losing Earth: A Recent History (MCD/Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Award, and a winner of awards from the Society of Environmental Journalists and the American Institute of Physics. He is also the author of the novels King Zeno (MCD/FSG, 2018); Odds Against Tomorrow (FSG, 2013); and The Mayor’s Tongue (Riverhead, 2008). Rich’s short fiction has been published by McSweeney’s, Esquire, Vice, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and the American Scholar; he was awarded the 2017 Emily Clark Balch Prize for Fiction and is a two-time finalist for the National Magazine Award for Fiction.

Rich is a writer-at-large for The New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to The Atlantic, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books. His reported pieces have appeared in various anthologies, including the Best American Nonrequired Reading and the Best American Science and Nature Writing.

Register here to watch on Arlington Public Library’s Youtube channel, where you can enter to win a free copy of Rich’s book!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Ten Arlington ceramic artists are among those participating in the Alexandria Clay CoOp’s annual Holiday Pottery Sale.

Get a head-start on your holiday gift shopping while you support local artists on Saturday, November 13. More than 20 regional artisans will offer everything from functional ware such as mugs, servers and bowls, to decorative sculptural work of every kind.

Alexandria Clay CoOp is a 70 member ceramic studio who enjoy the shared experience of creating a variety of functional and nonfunctional ceramics. ACC offers a full array of pottery services and equipment. Outfitted with 20 Brent B and C wheels, 4 cone 6 L&L electric kilns, a 2 slab rollers, 2 extruders, etc. everything an artist needs to turn their artistic visions into reality.

Six to ten member’s ceramics will be on display in their gallery for a two month period. The displayed work will change every two months to allow as many members as possible to benefit from the gallery space.

So, exhale… You’ve found the solution to your holiday gifting needs! Check out the annual Holiday Pottery Sale at the Alexandria Clay CoOp, 2389 S. Dove Street, Alexandria, Virginia, 22314.

For information about the sale and the CoOp, visit www.alexandriaclaycoop.com.

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

For many decades, zines (short for magazine or fanzine) have been an accessible and powerful medium to narrate and circulate stories and information through images and text.

Arlington Arts and the Department of Community Planning, Housing and Development are pleased to announce the release of the Langston Boulevard Zine, which will bring the history, stories and character of Langston Boulevard to life through illustrations by artist Liz Nugent. Created as part of Plan Langston Boulevard, the zine also celebrates the corridor’s new name after John M. Langston.

The Langston Boulevard Zine will create a lasting digest of the rich history and character of Langston Boulevard, connecting the community with the past and the present, while generating dialogue about a future vision for the corridor.

In 2019, Arlington County began Plan Langston Boulevard, a multi-year planning process for Langston Boulevard (formerly Lee Highway) to create a comprehensive plan for the corridor that provides guidance on how to direct future growth and investment toward community goals. As part of the planning process, the county and its planning consultant documented cultural and historical assets of the corridor and captured the character of the five neighborhood areas of the study. This work yielded two comprehensive documents, the Historic and Cultural Resources Report and the Neighborhood Inspiration Report. The zine brings to life aspects of these reports through artist Liz Nugent’s engaging illustrations.

In 2020, the Langston Boulevard Alliance started a public process for renaming Lee Highway to realize the years-long grassroots community effort to create a welcoming Main Street by removing the word “Highway” and to begin to reconcile the painful racial history many in the community experienced by changing the name “Lee.” The zine celebrates the new name for the corridor after John Mercer Langston, beloved civil rights activist and the first Black Congressman from Virginia, by illustrating his history and connections to Arlington and the Langston Boulevard community.

Arlington Arts is releasing excerpts from the zine on its social media platforms, and copies will be made available at various community events in the fall. You can request a free mailed copy of the zine by filling out a request form on the Langston Boulevard Zine project page.

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By guest blogger and artist Melanie Kehoss.

This year marks the fourth Arlington Visual Art Studio Tour (AVAST). On September 25 and 26, 48 artists open their studios to art lovers so they can see inside the artistic process and the studios, most of which are rarely open to the public.

The various disciplines include paintings, ceramics, metals, photography and more. The weekend event will begin with a launch party Friday, September 24, at the Cody Gallery on the Ballston campus of Marymount University.

After going virtual last year due to the pandemic, this marks the activity’s return to being an in-person format. The event will follow CDC guidelines with masking, social distancing, and other safety and health measures determined by individual artists.

AVAST is a joint effort of independent artists and volunteers, supported by contributors, including Schnider Investment group and Dominion Lighting, and in cooperation with Arlington’s visual art organizations. Arlington Arts was a founding sponsor of this new cultural tradition.

This year’s participants are listed, each with a sample photo and short description of their work, at this link. AVAST will add a guide with opening times and locations so that visitors can select for themselves the studios they wish to visit. The guides will be online and print versions will be available at Arlington galleries and sponsor locations starting in mid-September, and at studios during the tour.

For last year’s virtual tours, some 40 artists created online video tours that attracted thousands of viewers. To give you an idea of what you can once again experience in person, check out the montage of videos below.

For complete info on this year’s tour, visit the AVAST website and Facebook Page!

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Jazz is back in Rosslyn with a three-week celebration of music, food and fun!

The Rosslyn BID’s annual Rosslyn Jazz Fest has been reimagined with live performances around the neighborhood, culminating in an all-day event in Gateway Park on Sept. 18, featuring Three Man Soul Machine, Aaron Myers and Sin Miedo.

Enjoy the soulful sounds of local musicians, including Crush Funk Brass Band, Akua Allrich, Kingman Island Orchestra, and Cristian Perez, live from some of Rosslyn’s favorite outdoor venues. Plus, attendees can expect themed giveaways, prizes and restaurant deals throughout.

Beginning on Sept. 1, don’t miss pop-up performances from bands and soloists at Central Place Plaza, Continental Beer Garden and more. Jazz fans can also look forward to the return of last year’s popular Jazz Supper Club experience at Amuse at Le Méridien Arlington.

Rosslyn Jazz Fest is brought to audiences in partnership with Arlington Arts. For more information on Jazz Fest, please visit rosslynva.org and sign up for the Rosslyn BID’s newsletter at rosslynva.org/subscribe.

Please review the most current Virginia guidance surrounding COVID-19 before attending any in-person events. Do not attend if you or anyone in your household is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19.

For details, a 10% discount at participating restaurants and the full Rosslyn Jazz Fest schedule, visit the Rosslyn BID website.

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Experience a showcase of some of Arlington’s cultural gems in the “Spotlight Series,” the centerpiece of an extended outdoor concert season at Lubber Run Amphitheater. The series runs from Friday, Sept. 10 through Friday, Oct. 1. Unlike the traditional summer series, the schedule is designed so most ensembles will be in residence at the amphitheater throughout a particular weekend.

Arlington’s multiple Helen Hayes Award-winning Synetic Theater kicks things off with “Shhhhhhhakespeare Revue” (Friday and Saturday, Sept. 10-11 at 7:30 p.m.) and a special 11 a.m. family performance of “The Miraculous Magical Balloon” (Saturday, Sept. 11). Rounding out the opening weekend is The Arlington Philharmonic with a one-night-only presentation of their popular “Pops For Pets” (Sunday, Sept. 12, at 4 p.m.).

Avant Bard is on stage for the entire second weekend with “East of the Sun and West of the Moon” (Sept. 17-19 — Friday and Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m.). The power of poetry takes the stage with a showcase of Arlington poets, “Written in Arlington” (Thursday, Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m.)

With a special performance celebrating the return of live audiences, The Arlington Players are on tap for the third weekend with “Together At Last! A New Musical Revue” (Sept. 24-26 — Friday and Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.). The Series ends with the contemporary dance ensemble Jane Franklin Dance performing “The View From Here” (Friday, Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m.).

With innovation and resilience, Arlington’s resident ensembles met the unprecedented challenges of 2020. Pivoting entirely to online activations, their offerings ranged from movement classes offered for teleworking parents and their suddenly home-bound kids, to live-streaming presentations that won acclaim from the critics. Celebrate re-engaging with the arts via this special series, spotlighting Arlington’s wealth of artistry and talent.

Admission to Lubber Run Amphitheater remains FREE. This Venue will refer to the Virginia Department of Health (VDA) and Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations for preserving public health. Access to the venue is first come, first served, and that may be restricted due to capacity. A face covering is recommended for all unvaccinated patrons. Those who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear a face covering when outdoors. If you have COVID-19, are experiencing symptoms, know you have been exposed or are feeling sick, please stay home. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation to preserve the good health of our community.

So bring a picnic, some friends and enjoy some of the best performers that Arlington has to offer in the Spotlight Series at Lubber Run Amphitheater, located at 200 N. Columbus Street in Arlington (N. Columbus Street and 2nd Street N.). For detailed descriptions of the performances, visit ArlingtonArts.org.

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Even a thunderstorm couldn’t dampen Arlington’s resolve last Friday, with a full-capacity crowd present to hear blues singer-songwriter Chris Pierce at Lubber Run Amphitheater, reopening for the first time since its 50th Anniversary Season in 2019!

This coming weekend, Avant Bard presents a concert version of their hit “Gospel at Colonus” (Friday, July 16), and the Jogo Project brings their fusion of jazz and Go Go music (Saturday, July 17), followed by a family program by The Levine School of Music (Sunday, July 18).

Once the clouds lifted last Friday, Chris Pierce was welcomed to the stage by Arlington County Board Vice-Chair Katie Cristol and the Chair of the Arlington Commission on the Arts and Humanities Anika Kwinana. He then proceeded to weave his spell on the appreciative audience. With blue skies in evidence, even larger crowds continued through the opening weekend for performances.

The FREE events continue through Aug. 15, with concerts on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and family programming on Sundays at 11 a.m.

The summer continues with a mix of familiar names and Lubber Run debuts, including jazz vocalist Akua Allrich (Friday, July 23), reggae masters Nkula (Friday, July 30), the Colombian sounds of the all-female ensemble La Marvela (Friday, Aug 6) and the National Chamber Ensemble (Saturday, Aug. 14).

Since the construction of the first permanent stage in 1969, generations of Arlingtonians have enjoyed free summer cultural events at the sylvan venue nestled two blocks off Route 50, ranging from Arlington Children’s Theater to bands like Eddie from Ohio and superstar Ritchie Havens.

Admission to Lubber Run Amphitheater remains FREE. This Venue will refer to the  Virginia Department of Health (VDA) and Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations for preserving public health. Access to the venue is first come, first served and that may be restricted due to capacity. A face covering is recommended for all unvaccinated patrons. Those who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear a face covering when outdoors. If you have COVID-19, are experiencing symptoms, know you have been exposed or are feeling sick, please stay home. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation to preserve the good health of our community.

The Lubber Run Amphitheater Summer Concert Series runs July 9 through August 15, 2021, on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. with 11:00 a.m. family-oriented programming on Sundays (run-times vary).

So bring a picnic, some friends and enjoy the arts at Lubber Run Amphitheater, located at 200 N. Columbus Street in Arlington (N. Columbus Street and 2nd Street N.).

While there is a small parking lot, there is abundant free street parking in the surrounding Arlington Forrest neighborhood. For directions on how to get to Lubber Run Amphitheater and leave the car at home, check out the video at Arlington’s Car Free Diet, a program of Arlington County Commuter Services (ACCS), a bureau of the Department of Environmental Services!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Come on back out to Lubber Run Amphitheater, reopening for the first time since its 50th Anniversary Season in 2019!

Known for his moving rendition of the song “No One” from the hit ABC series “A Million Little Things,” blues singer-songwriter Chris Pierce kicks off the free Lubber Run Amphitheater Concert Series on Friday, July 9. The events continue through Aug. 15, with concerts on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., and family programming on Sundays at 11 a.m.

Since the construction of the first permanent stage in 1969, generations of Arlingtonians have enjoyed free summer cultural events at the sylvan venue, nestled two blocks off Route 50, with events ranging from Arlington Children’s Theater to bands like Eddie from Ohio and superstar Richie Havens.

Singled out for his song “American Silence,” NPR Music praised Chris Pierce for “channeling Richie Havens and Bob Dylan.” Rolling Stone described, “It’s the sound of everyone who’s hungry for change, steadying themselves and marching toward a common goal.”

Pierce was diagnosed at 15 with the rare hearing disorder Otosclerosis. Persevering through partial deafness, Pierce has emerged as an artist noted for his prescient observations about contemporary social issues. He has toured extensively with artists ranging from Buddy Guy, Jill Scott and Keb’ Mo’, to Seal and B.B. King.

Following Chris Pierce on Friday, July 9, Lubber Run Amphitheater’s Reopening Weekend continues with nationally acclaimed Brazilian-jazz ensemble Veronneau (Saturday, July 10), and the first of the season’s 11 a.m. Sunday family-oriented presentations, Arlington’s Encore Stage & Studio (Sunday, July 11). Avant Bard returns to open the following weekend with a concert version of their hit “Gospel at Colonus” (Friday, July 16). The summer continues with a mix of familiar names and Lubber Run debuts, including reggae masters Nkula (Friday, July 30) and the Colombian sounds of the all-female ensemble La Marvela (Friday, Aug 6).

Admission to Lubber Run Amphitheater remains free. This venue will refer to Virginia Department of Health (VDA) and Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations for preserving public health. Access to the venue is first come, first served and that may be restricted due to capacity. A face covering is recommended for all unvaccinated patrons. Those who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear a face covering when outdoors. If you have COVID-19, are experiencing symptoms, know you have been exposed to COVID-19 or are feeling sick, please stay home. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation to preserve the good health of our community.

The Lubber Run Amphitheater Summer Concert Series runs July 9 through Aug. 15, 2021, on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., with 11 a.m. family-oriented programming on Sunday mornings (run-times vary). So bring a picnic, some friends and enjoy the arts at Lubber Run Amphitheater, located at 200 N. Columbus Street.

While there is a small parking lot, there is abundant free street parking in the surrounding Arlington Forrest neighborhood. For directions on how to get to Lubber Run Amphitheater and leave the car at home, check out Arlington’s Car Free Diet, a program of Arlington County Commuter Services (ACCS), a bureau of the Department of Environmental Services!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Collaboration has long been the cornerstone of the Columbia Pike Blues Festival, one of Arlington’s most highly-anticipated events, presented by the Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization and programmed by Arlington Arts. This year a hybrid three-day Columbia Pike Blues Festival Weekend (Friday to Sunday, June 18, 19 and 20) combines live-streaming concerts and ticketed outdoor performances that will get you back into your summer groove!

Streaming concerts: 7:30 p.m. — June 18, 19 and 20

Three days of streaming concerts are a new feature made possible by a brand-new partnership with the popular “Live from The Rug Shop” Series sponsored by the Manoukian Brothers Oriental Rugs. The three concerts are:

  • Friday, June 18 — Stacy Brooks
    Stacy has been dubbed D.C.’s Queen of the Blues by her musical peers in Washington, D.C. She has multiple awards nominations under her belt and has won the D.C. Blues Battle of the Band and competed in the 30th Annual International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee. More…
  • Saturday, June 19 — Deletta Gillespie
    Deletta Gillespie is a multi-disciplinary teaching and performing artist, playwright, and singer/songwriter. Her stage debut came in her mother’s nightclub act at age 6, and she’s been on stage ever since. Gillespie charms audiences with her energetic stage performances, and a voice that has been described as “soulfully beautiful.”
  • Sunday, June 20 — Sol Roots Band
    The Sol Roots band performs a mix of raw funk, deep blues, energetic rock, greasy soul and hypnotic grooves. Sol is a guitarist and vocalist who has toured with many roots, funk, blues and soul legends around the world as a part of Music Maker Revue. The band has shared the stage with acts such as Jon Cleary, Soulive, Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles, and many more. Sol Roots was awarded “Best Blues Act/Group” 2019 by The Wammies/The MusicianShip. “Sol performs a soulful blend of rock and blues, with a natural stage presence” — Jambase

Live Ticketed Concerts: Saturday, June 19
Fillmore Shopping Center (2705 Columbia Pike)

Get your groove on at your choice of three separate live outdoor performances. Access to the individual concerts will require a ticket. The venue will be cleared following each act to prepare for the next audience group. Tickets will go on sale on Wednesday, June 3 at 11 a.m. for a donation of your choosing to the Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization (CPRO).

  • 1 p.m. — Robin Kapsalis, Vintage#18
    The first thing you notice when Vintage#18 hits the stage is Robbin Kapsalis’ white glass beaded fringe dress and white knee-hi boots as she sways on stage creating a hypnotic visual with the soul foundation of her voice: something between a Gladys Knight and Anita Baker. Mark Wenner of The Nighthawks says, “Robbin is a whirlwind of soulful excitement backed by one of the tightest trios in the trade.”
  • 2:30 p.m. — Cheick Hamala Diabate
    A D.C. staple when it comes to local authentic African musicians, Cheick brings his traditional West African plucked lute to the stage to please audiences that have included world leaders and the U.S. Congress. He also plays a mean banjo and guitar and has recorded and toured with American folk musicians, including banjo player Bob Carlin, a partnership that led to a Grammy nomination for Best Traditional World Music Album.
  • 4 p.m. — Carly Harvey
    Based out of Washington, D.C., Carly Harvey combines Blues, Jazz, Soul, & Americana roots styles to create a unique sound that calls to mind Etta James, Bonnie Raitt, Nina Simone, with a little Ella Fitzgerald thrown in for good measure.

For links to the streaming concerts and to purchase tickets to one of Saturday’s three live performances, visit the Columbia Pike website.

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“SMM-Jigsaw-Banner” by greyweed is licensed under CC BY 2.0

This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

From finding an outlet for stress through art, to sharpening the business skills of working artists, Arlington Arts has offered a wide range of capacity-building opportunities. The final round of our Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Classes on Zoom is designed to better promote your work by telling your unique story via social media.

Social Media Storytelling
Tuesday, May 18, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Social media is a form of communication that utilizes written, visual and verbal storytelling. By engaging with your audience in real time and being an active user, you can promote your work and build your core audience. The main ingredients for a successful social media presence are consistency and authenticity.

Learn why social media is important for small organizations and individual artists with Nicole Schenkman, Communications & Outreach Manager for City Blossoms, a successful D.C.-based nonprofit that cultivates the well-being of urban communities through creative programming in kid-driven gardens. Learn how to get started by setting up your goals and a communications strategy.

This is our final workshop until the fall. Attendees will receive a Zoom link via email after 5 p.m. the day before the event. Visit our Eventbrite page for registration fees and details.

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SMM-Jigsaw-Banner” (Illustration via greyweed/CC BY 2.0)

This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Arlington Arts continues to offer a range of capacity-building opportunities for Arlington artists. The final round of our Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Classes on Zoom can help you to sharpen your skills as creatives and better promote your work via social media.

Upcoming workshops include:

Hands, Paper Go!
Tuesday, May 4 and May 11, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Explore creative ways to work with paper and make fun personal storybooks by hand while learning about diverse traditions. No experience necessary and good for both budding and practicing artists.

Session 1: Fold, Cut, Punch, Glue. How did books start out, and what kinds of books did humans create? Learn about Japanese and Himalayan traditions as you fold, cut and punch papers to make creative books.

Session 2: Staple & Sew. How did different writing styles dictate the shape of books? Learn about ancient Islamic book art styles and enjoy blending them with today’s everyday materials.

Leading the above workshops is Sushmita Mazumdar, an Arlington-based artist, writer and educator. She works across stories, book arts and mixed media to explore her memories of home, heritage and migration from India. She mixes into her work present-day places, which inspire, and the community who collaborate, discuss and respond to inform her creations. Sushmita is the founder of Studio PAUSE, a community space for art and stories, and a studio arts instructor with the Smithsonian Associates.

Some supplies are needed in advance (not included with registration). See Eventbrite description for details. The final two sessions of her Artful Mind series’ are still ongoing: the origami session “Fold, Fold, Fold” (April 22) and paper workshop “Tear, Tear, Tear” (April 29).

Social Media Storytelling
Tuesday, May 18, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Social media is a form of communication that utilizes written, visual and verbal storytelling. By engaging with your audience in real-time and being an active user, you can promote your work and build your core audience. The main ingredients for a successful social media presence are consistency and authenticity.

Learn why social media is important for small organizations and individual artists with Nicole Schenkman, Communications & Outreach Manager for City Blossoms, a successful D.C.-based nonprofit that cultivates the well-being of urban communities through creative programming in kid-driven gardens. Learn how to get started with setting up your goals and a communications strategy.

Arlington Arts’ Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Classes often fill to capacity. Artists, performers and arts professionals looking to up their game are encouraged to explore the remaining sessions, continuing through May 18, 2021. (All classes are virtual.)

As this is our final round of workshops until the fall, classes are filling up quickly. Sign up now! Attendees will receive a Zoom link via email after 5 p.m. the day before the event. Certain supplies not included with your registration fee will be needed in advance. Visit our Eventbrite page for registration fees and details.

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