Arlington, VA

This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Poetry in Arlington is quite literally on the move. The six winners of Arlington’s 22nd annual MOVING WORDS Poetry Competition have their poems printed on colorful placards displayed aboard Arlington Transit ARTBus vehicles, enlivening the ride for thousands of commuters.

The six winning poets were juried by Arlington’s 2nd Poet Laureate, Holly Karapetkova, who also will have a poem displayed. The winners were chosen from a field of 211 poems submitted by 85 poets from the D.C. area. Printed on colorful placards and displayed prominently inside Arlington Transit’s ART Buses between February and September, their poems will be seen by thousands of riders. Each winner also will receive a $250 honorarium.

“This is like a new beginning,” said winner Rana Jaafar Yaseen, who is a published poet and TV host in her native Iraq. “I challenged myself to write in English, and this is my first work since leaving an abusive marriage last year. I see it as ‘a sign’ to get involved again in the creative world that I adore.”

Designed to promote the work of local writers and make poetry a part of daily life for commuters in Northern Virginia, the MOVING WORDS Program was launched in 1999 during National Poetry Month. It was conceived by award-winning poet and literary historian Kim Roberts (founder of Beltway Poetry Quarterly), the then Literary Program Coordinator for Arlington Cultural Affairs.

Originally held in partnership with Metrobus/WMATA, MOVING WORDS launched a new partnership with Arlington Transit for its 16th year. This complements another ongoing Arlington Arts program, Art on the ART Bus, which places original artwork by area artists inside select ART Buses. A parallel Student Competition is held in the fall as the culmination of the Pick a Poet project, a partnership between Arlington Cultural Affairs and the Arlington Public Schools Humanities Project, which places professional poets in APS classrooms.

Moving Words is a program of Arlington Arts in partnership with Arlington Transit, the poems are posted on the Arlington Arts website and will be archived on the Arlington County CommuterPage.com website. Read on to learn more about this year’s winners!

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Learn to get the best images in the Smartphone Photography workshop, Feb. 2 at 11 a.m.

This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

The initial session of the Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Classes kicked-off with a near-capacity registration! Artists, performers and arts professionals looking to up their game are encouraged to join in for the remaining Arts Enterprise Institute Sessions, continuing through March 2. (All classes are virtual.)

Arts Enterprise Institute is a program of Arlington Arts that exists to provide resources for artists and deepen their skill set to withstand the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Workshops, training, seminars and events integrate strong business skills, knowledge, life-long learning and artistic development with peer-to-peer learning and engagement with the community.

A cornerstone of these programs is artists teaching artists. Meet the instructors for the remaining sessions:

Sharmila Karamchandani is the instructor for Smartphone Photography: How to Use Your Phone to Take Great Photos and Online Shops — A Dozen Ways to Sell Your Art During the Pandemic.

Sharmila, a local graphic designer and artist-entrepreneur, has a passion for working in arts education and community nonprofits. Sharmila has a bachelor’s degree in advertising and a master’s degree in graphic design. Sharmila is extremely passionate about art and teaching. She teaches graphic design in a private college, and she has been an entrepreneur coach for Empowered Women International for the past 15 years and has taught many women how to start their businesses. She is also a certified Therapeutic Art Life Coach and facilitates visual art workshops for Heard, an Alexandria based nonprofit that works with a vulnerable population.

Sushmita Mazumdar is the instructor for Community Engagement for Artists.

Sushmita is an Arlington-based artist, writer, educator and founder of Studio Pause, her art studio and community space for art and stories, where she invites everyday people to make time to explore creativity and celebrate the art and stories in the community.

After a 15-year career in the advertising industry in India and the U.S., Sushmita taught herself writing and book arts to create unique storybooks about her childhood in India to show her American-born son how different yet wonderful lives can be.

Since 2010 she has participated in programs at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Glen Echo Park’s Popcorn Gallery. She has designed and taught projects for the Smithsonian Institution and its museums, Arlington Arts, DC Public Libraries, National Building Museum and Alexandria Black History Museum. In 2018, Sushmita was awarded Arlington County’s Woman of Vision award for her work at Studio Pause, and in 2019 she was appointed one of 13 Arts Commissioners for Virginia.

Classes are filling up quickly, so sign up now for the Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Semester, continuing through March 2. (Again, all classes are virtual.) The fee is just $20 per class.

Smartphone Photography: How to Use Your Phone to Take Great Photos — Feb. 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Online Shops: A Dozen Ways to Sell Your Art During the Pandemic — Feb. 16, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Community Engagement for Artists Instructor — March 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Learn to sell your creations during the pandemic in the Online Shops workshop, Feb. 16 at 11 a.m.
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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

New Year’s resolutions can be challenging to keep, but resolving to invest in your arts career is a good idea at any time of year.

Building upon the successful fall season (for which many sessions were at capacity), Arlington Arts continues its latest series of skill-building sessions with The Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Classes offered through our Arts Enterprise Institute, which run from Jan. 19 through March 2. (All classes are virtual.)

The Arts Enterprise Institute program exists to provide resources for artists and deepen their skill set to withstand the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Workshops, trainings, seminars and events integrate strong business skills, knowledge, life-long learning and artistic development with peer-to-peer learning and engagement with the community. A cornerstone of these programs is artists teaching artists.

Christine Searle is the instructor for Business Skills for Artists: Record-keeping.

Christine (CIA, CRMA, EA) is an internal audit and tax professional with over 35 years of experience helping nonprofits, businesses and individuals get control over and understand their finances and taxes. Christine specializes in helping entrepreneurs make informed financial and tax decisions and achieve their objectives. Christine started Searle Business Solutions, LLC in 2014. She has lived in Arlington since 2001 and has been engaged in community-based volunteer service for over 20 years.

Sharmila Karamchandani is the instructor for Smartphone Photography: How to Use Your Phone to Take Great Photos and Online Shops — A Dozen Ways to Sell Your Art During the Pandemic.

Sharmila, a local graphic designer and artist-entrepreneur, has a passion for working in arts education and community nonprofits. Sharmila has a bachelor’s degree in advertising and a master’s degree in graphic design. Sharmila is extremely passionate about art and teaching. She teaches graphic design in a private college, and she has been an entrepreneur coach for Empowered Women International for the past 15 years and has taught many women how to start their businesses. She is also a certified Therapeutic Art Life Coach and facilitates visual art workshops for Heard, an Alexandria based nonprofit that works with a vulnerable population.

Sushmita Mazumdar is the instructor for Community Engagement for Artists.

Sushmita is an Arlington-based artist, writer, educator and founder of Studio Pause, her art studio and community space for art and stories, where she invites everyday people to make time to explore creativity and celebrate the art and stories in the community.

After a 15-year career in the advertising industry in India and the U.S., Sushmita taught herself writing and book arts to create unique storybooks about her childhood in India to show her American-born son how different yet wonderful lives can be.

Since 2010 she has participated in programs at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Glen Echo Park’s Popcorn Gallery. She has designed and taught projects for the Smithsonian Institution and its museums, Arlington Arts, DC Public Libraries, National Building Museum and Alexandria Black History Museum. In 2018, Sushmita was awarded Arlington County’s Woman of Vision award for her work at Studio Pause, and in 2019 she was appointed one of 13 Arts Commissioners for Virginia.

Several classes in the fall session were at capacity, so sign up now for the Arts Enterprise Institute Spring Semester, from Jan. 19 through March 2. (Again, all classes are virtual!) The fee is just $20 per class.

Class recap:

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

For holiday shoppers in the know, the annual Lee Arts Center Holiday Show and Sale has been a cherished Arlington tradition that allows you to #shoplocal for the holidays — finding unique ceramics, prints and other handmade crafts. This year, Arlington Arts invites you to visit Lee Arts Center Artists on the Web, where in addition to shopping from the socially distanced comfort of your home, you can also explore the artists’ talents more deeply.

Located in a charming former 1920s schoolhouse, the Lee Arts Center is a fully equipped professional studio for artists working in ceramics and printmaking. The Center houses a mini-gallery with rotating exhibitions of visiting and resident artists. Master workshops are offered throughout the year. Of course, that’s what goes on usually… For the safety of the public and the artists alike, the center has been closed during the pandemic. Clearly, crowding into the confines of the space for a sale would not be feasible.

To help the Center’s member artists reach you, we designed a page on the Arlington Arts website where you can find many of your favorite Lee Arts Center artists and discover more of their work on their personal webpages. Please check out their websites — a few have web stores, too. You might even want to commission a work as a gift! You will also find links to other regional events and shows that our members are participating in as well as their social media accounts, so you can give them a follow.

Although none of this can replace Lee Arts Center’s much-loved venue and event, we encourage you to utilize this virtual space to reconnect with your favorite local artist and offer unique holiday gifts to your friends and loved ones. Check them out!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Even a pandemic cannot keep a good Yeti down.

In partnership with Arlington Arts, GRUMP has been Arlington’s holiday go-to over the past ten years for unique, unusual holiday gifts and handmade treasures. This year is no different with GRUMP at HOME bringing the experience directly to you.

The Yetis now deliver to your door! Shop from GRUMP’s curated online store of over 25 vendors and nearly 200 items. Do your holiday shopping and get the local arts and crafts show experience from the comfort and safety of home!

While you may not be able to hug GRUMP’s Yetis in real life, GRUMP, in addition to the over 50 unique makers, is planning fun, interactive activities like Yeti Tarot Readings, maker Instagram takeovers and Yeti Show and Tell.

Here is an overview of GRUMP socially-distanced, Zoom and Facebook-based activities for you to partake of over the next few days:

Social Media Maker Takeovers
November 27 to December 2 | via Facebook and Instagram

Between November 27 and December 2 makers will be taking over GRUMP’s Instagram and Facebook pages. Check out @ilovegrump on Instagram and facebook.com/ilovegrump to get an inside look into how 10 local makers devise their creations. Featuring makers like Potomac Chocolate, Auggie Froggy, Noctiluna, Moonlight Bindery and more!

Yeti Show N’ Tell
Sunday, November 29 | 1 p.m. | via Zoom

Meet the GRUMP Yeti online for this handmade Show N’ Tell. Bring your most prized handmade item to show our GRUMP Yeti. Bring the thing you are most proud of making yourself. Show Betty the Yeti, some GRUMP makers and GRUMP shoppers how much you love handmade in this fun meet and greet! Make sure you take a screen shot to show your friends that you got to Zoom with a Yeti.

Making Polymer Clay Earrings with Caddington Clay
Monday, November 30 | 7-8 p.m. | via Zoom

Learn how to make Polymer Clay Earrings with items you already have around your house. Join Megan DeMillo, owner of Caddington Clay, as she teaches the basics of polymer clay jewelry making and how to get started with just a few simple supplies.

New among the GRUMP makers is a group of Made in Arlington members whose normal holiday pop-ups have been canceled due to the pandemic. GRUMP is happy to support this group and share some of Arlington’s wonderful makers with you.

GRUMP at HOME takes place from November 27 through December 1, 2020. Check out www.grumpathome.com to see the full programming schedule and to meet the makers.

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Amid the many challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic poses for the arts and culture community, artists are taking the opportunity to strengthen capacity.

Arlington Arts continues its latest series of skill-building sessions: the Arts Enterprise Institute Fall Classes through our Arts Enterprise Institute, from October 27 through November 17 (all classes are virtual). Take all remaining classes for just $30.

Arts Enterprise Institute program exists to provide resources for artists and deepen their skill set to withstand the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Workshops, training, seminars and events integrate strong business skills, knowledge, life-long learning, and artistic development with peer-to-peer learning and engagement with the community. A cornerstone of these programs is artists teaching artists.

Mary Briggs is the instructor for: Crisis Management for Artists and Arts Organizations During COVID-19, Where to Find Funding for Individual Artists During COVID-19, and Where to Find Funding for Arts Organizations During COVID-19.

The co-founder and director of the You Are Here community arts non-profit in Jeanette, Pennsylvania and an adjunct lecturer at Goucher College, Towson, MD in the Masters in Cultural Sustainability program, Mary Briggs is also deeply knowledgeable about our community. From 1989 until 2011, Ms. Briggs served in a variety of positions on the staff of Arlington Cultural Affairs Division, ranging from Grants Manager to working with an array of Multi-Cultural organizations. She has been a presenter at numerous national and regional conferences and meetings including Americans for the Arts, Grantmakers in the Arts and American Folklore Society. Ms. Briggs also was an Arlington resident for several decades.

Caroline Weinroth is the instructor for: Tips Tricks and Hacks for Creating Better Virtual Experiences, and Social Media Strategies 1 and 2.

Caroline Weinroth is a musician, writer and artist. At George Mason University, she earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, with a concentration in Poetry, and a Bachelor of Arts in Theater & Audio Engineering. She is the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for the rock band Cinema Hearts. During the COVID-19 pandemic, she has performed livestream concerts for Center for the Arts GMU, Central Rappahannock Regional Library, Alexandria Office of the Arts and others.

Take ALL remaining classes for just $30! See below for details on each class and information on how to register!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Amid the many challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic poses for the arts and culture community, artists are taking the opportunity to strengthen capacity.

Toward that end, Arlington Arts is launching a new series of skill-building sessions: the Arts Enterprise Institute Fall Classes through our Arts Enterprise Institute, from October 27 through November 17 (all classes are virtual).

Dovetailing with our earlier partnership with the Washington Area Lawyers of the Arts (with workshops continuing through October 11), Arlington Arts now offers yet another opportunity for artists to learn and grow. Our Arts Enterprise Institute program exists to provide resources for artists and deepen their skill set to withstand the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Workshops, training, seminars and events integrate strong business skills, knowledge, life-long learning, and artistic development with peer-to-peer learning and engagement with the community. A cornerstone of these programs is artists teaching artists.

Mary Briggs is the instructor for: Crisis Management for Artists and Arts Organizations During COVID-19, Where to Find Funding for Individual Artists During COVID-19, and Where to Find Funding for Arts Organizations During COVID-19.

The co-founder and director of the You Are Here community arts non-profit in Jeanette, Pennsylvania and an adjunct lecturer at Goucher College, Towson, MD in the Masters in Cultural Sustainability program, Mary Briggs is also deeply knowledgeable about our community. From 1989 until 2011, Ms. Briggs served in a variety of positions on the staff of Arlington Cultural Affairs Division, ranging from Grants Manager to working with an array of Multi-Cultural organizations. She has been a presenter at numerous national and regional conferences and meetings including Americans for the Arts, Grantmakers in the Arts and American Folklore Society. Ms. Briggs also was an Arlington resident for several decades.

Caroline Weinroth is the instructor for: Tips Tricks and Hacks for Creating Better Virtual Experiences, and Social Media Strategies 1 and 2.

Caroline Weinroth is a musician, writer and artist. At George Mason University, she earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, with a concentration in Poetry, and a Bachelor of Arts in Theater & Audio Engineering. She is the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for the rock band Cinema Hearts. During the COVID-19 pandemic, she has performed livestream concerts for Center for the Arts GMU, Central Rappahannock Regional Library, Alexandria Office of the Arts and others.

These virtual classes are offered at a special rate: $30 for the first class and up to all-five additional classes in the series for free! See below for details on each class and information on how to register!

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This column is sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

By guest blogger and artist Melanie Kehoss.

The Arlington Visual Art Studio Tour (AVAST) is a self-guided free tour of artists in their studios held throughout Arlington County in early autumn. In response to the pandemic, this popular event is going virtual with a mix of videos and Facebook Live events from Wednesday, September 23 through Sunday, September 27.

This is a non-juried showcase for local artists to feature their work, processes and studio spaces. For the last several years, it’s been a popular way for the community to experience the richness and diversity of visual arts to be found in Arlington County.

In 2020, our tour will go entirely online, with videos and Facebook Live events featuring artists in their studios. This format not only helps our artists and visitors feel safe and secure, it also provides an opportunity to “visit” far more studios than would be feasible in-person. Moreover, this virtual tour will showcase Arlington studios to art lovers around the country and the world! And yes… Much of the artwork you’ll see is available for purchase (see website for details)!

The 2020 Tour will begin on Wednesday, September 23 at 9 a.m., when 28 video studio visits premiere on You Tube. The interactive portion of the tour takes place on Saturday, September 26 at 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, September 27 11 a.m.-4 p.m., when 12 more artists go live on Facebook.

Videos will also be available to watch after the event, but we encourage you to watch during the live sessions so you can comment and ask the artists questions! Look at the list of participating artists and the full schedule on the AVAST Website!

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This column is written and sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

The ripple-effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has deeply impacted the region’s arts and culture community. But the creative community is often inspired by adversity to take the opportunity to grow. As such, Arlington Arts is proud to be part of a cross-jurisdictional partnership in support of a great capacity-building opportunity. .

Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts (WALA), in collaboration with three Northern Virginia Arts Agencies — Alexandria Office of the Arts, Torpedo Factory Arts Center, Arlington Arts and ArtsFairfax — will bring its popular six-part Creative Entrepreneurs Series of workshops to Northern Virginia Artists and Arts Organizations.

As part of our commitment to ensure that Arlington-based artists, performers and creatives have access to this opportunity, Arlington Arts has subsidized a limited number of tickets to each workshop that are available for FREE.

WALA’s Creative Entrepreneurs Series (CES) is a series for creatives of all kinds who want to take the next step in their professional career by creating their own business. Explore the basics of forming a business for your creative endeavors, from deciding whether to incorporate as a non-profit or for-profit entity, to understanding copyrights and trademarks, to contract and negotiation skills, and finally to taxes and understanding the grants process.

“This is an historic partnership with Northern Virginia’s three leading arts agencies,” says WALA Executive Director John C. Good. “Bringing these workshops to the Northern Virginia Arts Community — especially during these challenging times — will provide creatives with the business tools necessary to take their art to a broader audience, to protect their art from piracy, and maximize their money-making potential. It a boot-camp for arts entrepreneurs.”

The series comprises of six sessions to be held on *consecutive Tuesdays, starting Tuesday, September 15 and continuing through Tuesday, October 20 from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Each interactive workshop is facilitated by an expert WALA volunteer, and includes livestream access, supporting materials and ample time for audience Q&A. The six sessions are as follows:

September 15 — Copyright/Trademark Protection & Use
September 22 — Contracts & Licensing
October 6 — Negotiation Strategies
October 13 — Tax Strategies
October 20 — Grants

The WALA Creative Entrepreneurs Series is free for WALA members and $20 per workshop for non-members. Reduced rate General Admission tickets available through September 8. Arlington Arts is offering a limited number of free tickets to each of these workshops, and they are going fast.

To avail yourself of the opportunity, Arlington-based artists may visit the Arlington Arts website and register through the calendar listing on the Arts Enterprise Institute webpage (the discount will be automatically applied).

#ARLINGTONARTS  #WALANOVA

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This column is written and sponsored by Arlington Arts/Arlington Cultural Affairs, a division of Arlington Economic Development.

Recognizing the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on arts and culture organizations throughout the region, the Greater Washington Community Foundation and The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation have joined with seven other funders to launch the $1 million Arts Forward Fund to support arts and culture organizations in the D.C. region as they make essential shifts needed to continue their work during the COVID-19 pandemic and respond to the nationwide movement for racial justice.

Arts Forward Fund will make grants ranging from $10,000 to $50,000 to support short-term capacity-building, training, and innovation.

Arts Forward Fund will prioritize organizations that serve Black, Indigenous and other communities of color, and organizations with limited access to philanthropic capital. It will also prioritize requests that address longstanding racial inequities in organizations, in the arts and culture field, and in the broader community.

Arts and culture organizations with annual revenue of less than $10 million in their most recently completed fiscal year are eligible to apply, provided they serve the District of Columbia, Montgomery and Prince George’s counties in Maryland, and Arlington and Fairfax counties and the cities of Alexandria, Falls Church and Fairfax in Virginia.

Informational webinars will take place on August 14 and 20, in advance of the deadline for application. The application deadline is August 27, and grant decisions will be made on or before September 21. More details and the call for applications are available here.

#ArtsForwardFund

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