Arlington, VA

More than one year after all Arlington Public Library branches were shuttered due to the coronavirus, five branches remain closed. 

This summer and fall, the library is looking to reopen four of these branches, which currently only allow people to drop books off.

“Based on the recently approved Arlington County FY22 Budget, the Library plans to expand open locations after July 1, as hiring and training of new staff allows,” said a recent announcement from the library system.

The Aurora Hills branch and the newly renovated Columbia Pike branch could open in July. Next up would be the Cherrydale and Glencarlyn branches, which the library announcement said could open “by fall 2021 and sooner if possible.”   

Three locations are currently open. Central Library allows people to pick up the books they have on hold, while the Shirlington and Westover branches are open for 30 minutes of in-person browsing with self-service checkout.

The library is also looking to expand services at these three locations. It aims to increase access to library collections, public computers and public space at all locations while keeping social distancing in mind. 

Remaining closed, for now, is the branch in the lobby of county government headquarters in Courthouse.

“The Plaza branch will remain closed in preparation for a long-planned expansion and renovation,” the announcement said. 

Arlington Public Library is planning for socially distanced outdoor programs this summer. Among these include outdoor storytimes, which will kick off Tuesday, May 18 at Central Library.

Its summer reading challenge will begin June 1, and Arlington Public Library’s mobile truck will “continue to hit the road and be visible at community events.”

One change of note for returning library patrons: during the pandemic, Arlington Public Library permanently eliminated late fees, a change intended to “make the library more accessible to all.”

Photo via Arlington Public Library

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Parts of Arlington County have been experiencing power problems this morning.

Currently, more than 1,200 power customers are reported to be in the dark in the Virginia Square, Cherrydale and Ballston neighborhoods, according to an outage map from Dominion Energy.

Some complication have been reported from that outage, including tripped fire alarms, smoke from generators starting up, non-functioning traffic signals and a potential power surge in a building.

Several traffic light issues were reported earlier this morning, in Clarendon and Ballston. It’s unclear if those problems are related to the current power outage.

https://twitter.com/WTOPtraffic/status/1374341756666384392

Update at 11:05 a.m. — The outage is down to about 350 Dominion customers, per the power company’s website.

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This neighborhood in Arlington County doesn’t just have a great name — it also stands out as one of the best places to live in Virginia.

Like all of Arlington, the real estate market in Cherrydale is thriving right now. We are seeing a ton of traffic as people are moving up from Arlington condos to the single-family homes in this bucolic locale. So join the Keri Shull Team today as we share everything you need to know about the in-demand Cherrydale neighborhood of Arlington.

And, as always, if you have any questions about Arlington real estate, please contact the Keri Shull Team, the No. 1 top-selling real estate team in the Washington, D.C. area.

Location is Everything

Cherrydale is a lovely suburban neighborhood in northern Arlington, sitting just to the north of the Orange Line Corridor. The area is bordered on the south by I-66 and stretches across US-29, which contributes to the convenient commutes that help keep Cherrydale popular.

Although you might not expect it from Cherrydale’s relaxed, suburban atmosphere, the neighborhood directly abuts some of Arlington’s busiest areas. In particular, Cherrydale sits right to the north of Clarendon and Virginia Square. This means that the area is perfect for people who work in Arlington or attend school at one of the prestigious institutions along the Orange Line.

A Life in the Cherry Orchard

Cherrydale’s history traces back to the late 1800s when a post office opened in the area and took its name from a nearby cherry orchard. Today, that long history is still apparent in Cherrydale, thanks to a plethora of well-maintained homes that were built in the early 1900s.

Speaking of homes, most of the houses for sale in Cherrydale are single-family homes. When paired with the quiet streets and lush greenery, this helps give Cherrydale a classic, suburban feel.

Cherrydale is well known for its exceptional public schools, job opportunities, outdoor activities, and easy commuting. This family-friendly neighborhood is one at the top of our list. The local community organization hosts numerous events to bring residents together, including their Annual Neighborhood Yard Sale and Fourth of July Block Party.

Owning a Home in Cherrydale

In general, houses in Cherrydale hold their property value and appreciate well, meaning that buying a home in the neighborhood can be a smart investment for many people.

So why are homes in such high demand in Cherrydale? Cherrydale’s market remains hot because it’s the neighborhood that has it all. With both a family-friendly atmosphere and easy access to all of the nightlife and entertainment in Arlington, this community is thriving right now.

Getting Around ARL

We rate Cherrydale 10/10 when it comes to commuting. The neighborhood is within walking or biking distance of the Virginia Square and Ballston Metro stops. This means that residents can easily access the conveniences of D.C. and NoVA via the Orange Line.

Plus, with a respectable Walkscore of 74, it is very possible to take care of daily errands via foot, all without sacrificing the quiet of suburbia.

The real estate market is thriving in Cherrydale right now because it is a popular and desirable neighborhood. Thanks to the quiet, regal beauty of the area — as well as the amazing transit options and walkability — Cherrydale continues to be a hotspot in Arlington real estate.

On top of this, we are seeing an increasing interest in single-family homes in 2021, with more and more condominiums going on the market as families outgrow their homes. This means people are moving away from high-rise neighborhoods like Rosslyn or Ballston and into more suburban locals — such as Cherrydale.

This means if you want to find a home in Cherrydale, you need to have every advantage that you can get!

How to Find a Home in Cherrydale

At the Keri Shull Team, we have hundreds of off-market properties that you cannot find online or anywhere else, and we want to give you priority access to these homes before they even go on the market!

And if you are selling a house in Arlington, it’s more important than ever to make sure you are taking the proper precautions to protect your investment. The best way to do that is to speak with a top-tier real estate agent and create a completely customized home selling strategy.

So what are you waiting for? Schedule a time for a free, no-pressure consultation with one of our Real Estate Needs Analysts!

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A teen is facing a number of charges after some early morning vehicular mayhem in Arlington on Saturday.

Arlington County police say the teen was prowling the Hall’s Hill neighborhood in a stolen Chevrolet Camaro, looking for unlocked cars. He was accompanied by at least three other suspects and two other vehicles.

“At approximately 5:07 a.m., police were dispatched to the report of a vehicle tampering in the 2000 block of N. Cameron Street,” police said in a press release Monday. “The reporting party advised they had observed four suspects associated with a Chevrolet Camaro trying door handles of parked vehicles in the area. A responding officer located the suspect vehicle, with two other vehicles following closely behind and attempted a traffic stop.”

The three vehicles fled at high speed, but were located nearby.

“Additional officers attempted to stop the vehicles on N. Culpeper Street where the driver of a sedan with Maryland temporary tags accelerated towards them, attempted to strike an officer who was on foot, and crashed into a police cruiser,” police say. “No officers were injured.”

The suspects then fled onto Lee Highway, where officers again spotted them and initiated a chase. The Camaro later crashed into a median near the Washington Blvd and Route 50 interchange, and the teen was taken into custody after “a brief foot pursuit.”

He is now facing charges of Conspiracy to Commit a Felony, Burglary, Eluding, and Motor Vehicle Theft.

Another of the suspect vehicles — a black Mercedes — was found abandoned on the 100 block of N. Edgewood Street, a few blocks from where the Camaro crashed. Officers, assisted by the U.S. Park Police helicopter, searched the area but did not find the driver.

The Camaro was stolen from Arlington’s Dominion Hills neighborhood, police said, while the Mercedes was stolen from Hall’s Hill after a home break-in.

“The suspects had entered a separate unlocked vehicle, located a garage door opener and made entry into their residence from the garage,” said ACPD. “Once inside, the suspects stole a purse containing keys to the Mercedes and fled the scene in the vehicle before being located by officers.”

The thefts and chases are the latest in a year-and-a-half long spate of vehicle break-ins and thefts, many involving suspects who search for unlocked cars and other crimes of opportunity.

The police press release noted that another recent crime — a car stolen from a home with an open garage door on Friday — may be related.

This incident is being investigated as related to a similar residential burglary reported on February 19. At approximately 9:59 a.m., police were dispatched to the 2300 block of N. Quebec Street for the report of a burglary just discovered. Upon arrival, it was determined that at approximately 5:00 a.m., the suspects gained entry to the residence from an open garage door. Once inside, the suspects stole wallets, cash and vehicle keys. The suspects then used the vehicle keys to flee the scene in the victim’s 2021 white Mercedes.

ARLnow hears that the home from which the white Mercedes was stolen is owned by former Washington Wizards center Marcin Gortat. Real estate listings suggest that the property in the Cherrydale neighborhood is being rented.

The Arlington County Police Department, meanwhile, is asking for the public’s help in identifying the car theft suspects.

The investigation into these incidents and the identities of the involved parties is ongoing. Anyone with information or video surveillance that may assist with the investigation is asked to contact Detective D. Johnson at 703-228-4193 or [email protected] or Detective S. Whalin at 703-228-4159 or [email protected] Information may also be reported anonymously through the Arlington County Crime Solvers hotline at 1-866-411-TIPS (8477).

The department also offered the following burglary prevention and safety tips.

Read More

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Police are looking for a man who allegedly exposed himself to a girl in the Cherrydale area late last week.

The incident happened around 12:3o p.m. Friday on the 3200 block of Lee Highway. Police say the man called the girl over to his car to ask for directions, then grabbed her phone.

When the girl went to grab the phone back, she saw the man masturbating, according to an Arlington County Police Department crime report.

More from ACPD:

INDECENT EXPOSURE (late), 2021-02120080, 3200 block of Lee Highway. At approximately 12:26 p.m. on February 12, police were dispatched to the report of an indecent exposure. Upon arrival, it was determined that at approximately 10:00 a.m. on September 14, 2020, the juvenile female victim was walking in the area when a male suspect inside a vehicle called out to her asking for directions. As the victim was showing directions on her phone, the suspect grabbed the device from her hands. As she got closer to the window, she observed the suspect’s pants were down and he was masturbating. The victim grabbed her phone back from him and he fled the scene at a high rate of speed. The suspect is described as a Black male, approximately 35 – 40 years old driving a black Honda CRV. The investigation is ongoing.

A fracas at a local hotel on New Year’s Day prompted a large police response early Friday morning.

The incident happened during some sort of New Year’s Eve party at the Embassy Suites hotel in Crystal City, on the 1300 block of Richmond Highway. Police responded after a report of a fight, and encountered “a large crowd in the lobby of the building and multiple fights in progress throughout the hotel.”

A 21-year-old Dumfries resident was subsequently arrested for allegedly having a concealed gun without a permit.

From an Arlington County Police Department crime report:

WEAPONS VIOLATION, 2021-01010006, 1300 block of Richmond Highway. At approximately 12:30 a.m. on January 1, police were dispatched to the report of a fight. Upon arrival, officers located a large crowd in the lobby of the building and multiple fights in progress throughout the hotel. While dispersing the crowds, officers made an observation consistent with that of a concealed weapon on the male suspect’s waistband and made contact with the individual. It was subsequently determined that he was in possession of a concealed firearm without a valid permit. Martine Neal, 21, of Dumfries, Va., was arrested and charged with Carrying a Concealed Weapon and held on an unsecured bond.

At the same location, nearly two hours later, police responded after two people were reportedly attacked “by a group of approximately ten male suspects.” From ACPD:

ASSAULT BY MOB, 2021-01010038, 1300 block of Richmond Highway. At approximately 2:18 a.m. on January 1, police were dispatched to the report of a fight in progress. Upon arrival, it was determined a verbal dispute occurred between parties inside a hotel room. As the two victims attempted to have the other party leave the room, they were assaulted by a group of approximately ten male suspects. The suspects fled the area prior to police arrival. Both victims suffered minor injuries and were transported by medics to an area hospital for treatment. There is no suspect descriptions. The investigation is ongoing.

Also in today’s ACPD crime report, a woman who was cleaning a room in a business had to break a window with a chair in order to flee a man who allegedly locked the door, took off his pants and touched her inappropriately.

The name of the business was not specified, but it happened on the 3300 block of Lee Highway, which is home to the Inns of Virginia hotel and several other businesses.

ABDUCTION WITH INTENT TO DEFILE, 2021-01020061, 3300 block of Lee Highway. At approximately 10:20 a.m. on January 2, police were dispatched to the report of an assault just occurred. Arriving officers located the suspect exiting a room and took him into custody without incident. The investigation determined that the victim was cleaning a vacant room within a business when the male suspect allegedly entered the room and locked the door behind him. The victim then attempted to unlock the door, however, the suspect got between her and the door and re-latched it. The victim attempted to unlock the door several more times unsuccessfully. The suspect began to touch the victim inappropriately, then removed his pants, at which time the victim was able to break a window to an exterior hallway outside with a chair and escape the room. She sustained minor injuries during the incident. Khalil Martin, 27, of Washington, D.C. was arrested and charged with Abduction with Intent to Defile, Burglary with Intent to Commit Larceny/Assault & Battery, Sexual Battery, and Drunk in Public. He was held on no bond.

Morning Notes

Dorsey’s Bankruptcy Case Dismissed — “Arlington County Board member Christian Dorsey, whose ethical and financial difficulties have tangled him in a web of false statements over the past year, fraudulently misrepresented his assets while filing for bankruptcy, a federal court ruled Friday… It was ‘an act of overt misrepresentation,’ [bankruptcy trustee] Thomas P. Gorman told the court at a hearing on Thursday, and ‘misconduct . . . so over the line’ that punishment was warranted.” [Washington Post]

Holiday Shopping Safety Tips — “ACPD wants you to have a happy and safe holiday season. While many are choosing to shop online this year, those shopping in-store are encouraged to be mindful of these safety tips.” [Twitter]

Event for Military Families Today — “An annual Winter Wonderland for Military Families hosted by a former NFL player and his wife will look very different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Derrick Dockery and his wife Emma will hold a drive-thru version of the event that provides toys and holiday cheer to military kids and families on Dec. 7 at a parking lot in Arlington, Virginia through their nonprofit, Yellow Ribbons United.” [Radio.com]

Santa Visit Still on This Weekend — “Santa Claus has paid a visit to the Cherrydale Volunteer Fire Department every year for over a century and he’s not going let the coronavirus pandemic force him to break that streak. In the interest of public safety, the jolly old elf will be meeting children outside this year in the parking lot of Cherrydale Baptist Church, which is located at 3910 Lorcom Lane.” [Patch]

More on CaBi Station at DCA — “Arlington County, Virginia, has installed a Capital Bikeshare station at Reagan National Airport, making it the first major metropolitan airport in the U.S. with a dock-based shared bike program. It is the 99th Capital Bikeshare dock installed in Arlington County.” [WTOP]

Gunston Coordinator Honored — “Shantha Smith, an education coordinator at Gunston Middle School, has been named a recipient of the 2020 Mary Peake Award for Excellence in Education by the state government. Awards were presented Dec. 3 in Richmond, and were named after a pioneering African-American educator.” [InsideNova]

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A giant photograph of four Black children who made history in Arlington was just installed in the new wing of Dorothy Hamm Middle School (4100 Vacation Lane), which is close to being completed.

The mural honors Ronald Deskins, Michael Jones, Lance Newman and Gloria Thompson, who set foot in Stratford Junior High School on Feb. 2, 1959, officially ending the practice of segregation in Arlington Public Schools.

“What a beautiful tribute and celebration of four amazing APS students!” School Board member Barbara Kanninen said on social media.

“It’s such an awesome, hopeful story,” said Ellen Smith, principal of the new Dorothy Hamm Middle School.

Smith is excited for her students to see history come to life at their school, which opened in September 2019 while construction on a new addition continued. Once the last touches on the wing are finalized, the school will be 100% complete.

The middle school weaves in history through its name — after Dorothy Hamm, a key figure in the charge to integrate Arlington Public Schools — plus installations recounting the history of racial integration, Smith said. Gone is the old identity as a segregated school named after Stratford Hall, the plantation where Confederate general Robert E. Lee spent his childhood.

From the beginning, the architectural team and Arlington Public Schools wanted to incorporate into students’ experience the idea that kids and the community advocated for integration, she said.

“The retelling and knowledge of this story is part of our mission as a school,” Smith said. “I expect it to be a part of students’ lived experiences every year.”

A new commemorative walk outside will have illustrated panels retelling the story of integration. Inside, historical artifacts from the Hamm family will also be on display.

Smith plans to recognize the first day of school for Deskins, Jones, Newman and Thompson every Feb. 2. Additionally, the school curriculum will include the topics of integration, civil rights and social justice, she said.

Although the building has changed uses since the four entered it 61 years ago — most recently housing the H-B Woodlawn program since the 1970s — the interior configuration has largely stayed the same, Smith said. The biggest upgrades include the new name and a new wing to the west of the school, which is a few finishing touches away from being completely done.

After the H-B Woodlawn program moved to Rosslyn, work began to convert the building into a neighborhood middle school. Construction started in early 2018 and continued after Smith opened the school last September. Just seven months later, students were learning remotely due to the pandemic, and the pace of construction has accelerated without students present, the principal said.

The new wing features a new library, a small gym and 15 classrooms, including a family consumer sciences (previously known as home economics) classroom and a makerspace.

“The architectural team did a fantastic job: It’s very bright, geometric and light-filled,” Smith said.

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The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is hoping to fuel a discussion about dog sled races with a protest tomorrow at a local gas station.

PETA is planning a protest, starting at noon on Thursday, at the Exxon station on the corner of Old Dominion Drive and Military Road in Cherrydale. At issue: ExxonMobil’s support of the Iditarod dog race in Alaska.

“Because ExxonMobil continues to pump money into the deadly Iditarod dog race even as other sponsors have pulled out, PETA supporters armed with yellow caution tape and ‘blood’-filled gas jugs will ‘close’ a local ExxonMobil station for cruelty tomorrow,” the organization said in a media advisory this afternoon.

The action follows another PETA protest, in September, at ExxonMobil’s Texas headquarters.

More on why the Iditarod is worthy of protest, even as far away as Arlington, according to PETA:

“ExxonMobil has the shameful distinction of being one of the last major companies still sponsoring the Iditarod’s cruelty to dogs,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “PETA is urging it to stop propping up an evil industry that forces dogs to run so far and so fast that they often die after inhaling their own vomit.

Jack Daniel’s, Coca-Cola, Wells Fargo, Alaska Airlines, and many other companies cut ties with the race after PETA pointed out that more than 150 dogs have died in the Iditarod since it began. In addition to being tied up on mushers’ properties (as revealed in this PETA exposé), dogs are forced to pull heavy sleds across 1,000 miles through blinding blizzards and subzero temperatures.

More than 220 dogs were pulled off the trail during the 2020 race because of exhaustion, illness, injury, or other causes. One, Cool Cat, developed twisted intestines and almost died. Another, Betty, had pneumonia and was in critical condition, and two others refused to eat and had fevers, diarrhea, and persistent coughs.

Photo courtesy of PETA

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One of Arlington’s glass recycling bins is being moved to improve access to those in the far northern reaches of the county.

The drop-off bin in the Cherrydale library parking lot, which has been there since last fall, is being moved to the Madison Community Center  (3829 N. Stafford Street) later this week.

“The new glass recycling drop-off bin will be available starting at 9 a.m. on Friday,” the county said. “The location of this site, along with the County’s four other glass drop-off sites, allows for glass drop-off centers to be available within 2.25 miles of all County residents. Convenience is an important component in making recycling drop-off centers successful.”

The county’s other purple glass drop-off bins are located at:

  • Quincy Park (N. Quincy Street and Washington Blvd)
  • Shirlington Trades Center (2700 S. Taylor Street)
  • Aurora Hills Community Center (735 18th Street S.)
  • Lee Community Center (5722 Lee Highway)

Glass was removed from Arlington’s curbside recycling collections last year, but residents have flocked to the bins in order to keep their bottles and jars out of landfills.

“In just a year, our community has recycled over 2 million pounds of glass and we hope to continue the success of the program together,” the county said.

Much of the glass collected by the bins is sent to Fairfax County to be crushed and used as construction material, but some has been sent to a processing plant and turned into new glass products.

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Two Arlington teens are facing felony charges after an alleged vandalism spree in the new Dorothy Hamm Middle School.

Police were dispatched to the under-construction school on Vacation Lane — which formerly housed the H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program — just after 11 p.m. Wednesday, following a burglar alarm activation. They found two 18-year-olds and a slew of damaged property, according to the Arlington County Police Department.

“Arriving officers established a perimeter and observed the suspects exit the building,” police said in a crime report. “One suspect was taken into custody, while the second suspect attempted to flee on foot. Officers later located the second suspect nearby and took him into custody without incident.”

The teens “were arrested and charged with Burglary with Intent to Commit Larceny/Assault & Battery/Other Felony, Conspiracy to Commit a Felony, Destruction of Property and Consume/Purchase/Possess Alcohol: <21 Years Old,” the crime report said. “They were held on no bond.”

A police spokeswoman said the damage was mostly from graffiti.

“The suspects allegedly tore down posters and papers and spray painted various items throughout the building,” said ACPD’s Ashley Savage. “A cost estimate of damages is ongoing.”

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