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Java Shack Takes Part in Transit Screen Pilot Program

by Katie Pyzyk — January 10, 2012 at 10:34 am 3,602 120 Comments

Visitors to Java Shack (2507 Franklin Rd.) in Courthouse can now pick up more than just a coffee and bakery item. A transit screen fixed near the register lets them pick up a better idea of what transit options are available in the neighborhood.

The pilot project came about when Arlington County Commuter Services offered to put up funding for creating systems that help people better understand their transit options. They collaborated with Mobility Lab to come up with some ideas, and the transit screens were born.

David Alpert is Mobility Lab’s Project Manager for the Transit Tech Initiative, and was a bit surprised by the request. He says it’s fairly unusual for a local government to push for this kind of research and development.

“We wanted to push the envelope with this technology,” Alpert says. “It’s really great that Arlington is able to provide that.”

The screens display constantly updated times and availability for a variety of transit options, including Metrobus, Metrorail, ART Bus and Capital Bikeshare. Alpert believes more people would use public transit if they realized how many options are readily available in real time. He said public transit not only helps people get around, but improves the quality of their lives.

“Arlington has had so much growth in the Rosslyn to Ballston corridor, but not a ton of traffic growth, because so many options are out there,” Alpert said. “Buses, metro, biking. It improves, of course, the environment but people’s happiness as well.”

So far the only other location to be included in the pilot program is The Red Palace in Washington, DC. Java Shack owner Dale Roberts was approached due to his previous work with ACCS. Roberts says the screen, which hangs unobtrusively from the ceiling near the cash register, doesn’t interfere with his business at all. In fact, customers are asking about it and have given a lot of positive feedback.

“The idea is to get people to be aware that there are lots of options besides just using their own car,” Roberts said. “Seeing that screen lets me know how many options are right there at the corner of the coffee shop.”

Mobility Lab is still working out how it will fund the project in order to expand it. The equipment costs about $400, and businesses will likely have to foot the bill. Alpert says the pricing structure hasn’t been formulated yet and  many different ideas have been floated.

Idealistically, Roberts believes the transit screen concept is a great idea. Practically, that may not be the case. He’s heard praise for the idea from neighboring business owners, but all have been deterred by the anticipated cost.

“I think it’s a great thing,” Roberts said, “But right now during the economic times we’ve all been through, every business is watching their finances.”

Roberts said if he were going to make such a large scale investment, he’d want more concrete evidence that it would have a positive financial impact on his business. Alpert believes just having the screens will be enough to get businesses noticed more, leading to increased foot traffic. He also said the transit screens will allow people to spend more time in a store, restaurant or bar because they won’t leave early in an attempt to catch their bus or train. That extra time could prompt customers to buy an additional item or two.

Mobility Lab hopes to soon expand the pilot program with paying customers. There’s also interest in doing a more formal survey to figure out what tweaks can be made, and how to pay for the project in the future. Overall, the transit screen has received positive feedback from customers at Java Shack.

“It took people a while to notice it,” Roberts said. “But once people noticed it they really wanted to see it there.”

  • John Fontain

    Taxpayer money is burning a hole in Arlington County’s pocket.

    • drax

      A screen in a coffee shop costs less than new highway lanes.

      • Josh S

        This is like the digital equivalent of a rubber stamp. Any story mentions expenditures by county government? Out with this comment (or one nearly like it)…..

        Fluff.

        • CW

          I’m not sure if it is fluff. People drive because they want to get to work. Maybe some of them would use public transit if it were not so inconvenient to them. Part of that inconvenience is scheduling and timing, especially for multimodal transit users. Maybe this system will reduce some of that inconvenience for some users. Thus maybe it will take even a few cars off the road. Therefore, I do not find the comment to be without merit.

          • Josh S

            No, I meant that John Fontain’s comment was fluff.

            I think the screen is kind of neat.

      • http://www.exactcom.com.au/proofs/KombiPics/Wrecks/bayBushOvergrown.jpg Overgrown Bush

        So does a pair of tennis shoes, but it doesn’t help the commute any.

        • drax

          Sure it does.

  • bobco85

    I really like the design of it. The information on the Metro buses and trains is clear and easily understood by the viewer without having to have a key on the page.

    However, given the location of the display screen (up near the ceiling), some of the text might be too small to read. I recommend putting it at eye level. The Capital Bikeshare section needs to be redone (can anybody read the text “Capital Bikeshare” that is directly to the right of the logo? It’s there) because the text is too small and the color choice (thin red text against black background) leaves too little contrast for it to be read.

    To explain my long criticism: I do freelance graphic/web design and am very interested in it, so yes, this stuff is important to me.

    This looks like it would be a really nice app for a tablet or widget for a laptop.

    • shack regular

      the ceiling in the javashack is relatively low. the photo above doesn’t do it justice. i would recommend taking a trip over to the shack to see it prior to offering your criticism.

      • Shack-a-lack

        I concur. It’s quite handy, and totally readable when you’re in line for the register. Awesome espresso, too!

        • JustDoIt

          It’s an open source project. You can make the changes you want yourself, and submit them to the project.

          https://github.com/MobilityLab/Transit-Screen.git

          • bobco85

            Thanks for the info! I’ve never worked with Git before (never heard of it, really). I’ll look into it, and see if I can learn and hopefully contribute to the project.

          • TGEoA

            DVCS is awesome technology.

  • DarkHeart

    JS > Starbucks

  • CW

    David Alpert? That David Alpert? I didn’t know he had this side project. Haven’t run across anything out of him since the inane, mind-numbing comments on GGW drove me away screaming lest I poke my eyes out about two years ago.

    • Rick

      That guy hates cars more than Zimmerman. I’m glad he was able to channel his powers for good

  • novasteve

    Unlike the displays on Metrorail, these won’t spend 90% of display time showing which elevators are out of service so they actually display arrival times like they were designed for.

    • The Dope of South Arlington

      Those signs in Metro are useless. They aren’t even real-time, they are just when the train is “scheduled” to arrive.

      • CW

        Yep. I think that there are sensors at locations on the track that are triggered by the train passing by, and then it displays the scheduled time for the train to get from that location to where the display board is. Of course, therein lies the problem. If you’re in Ballston and a train is waiting to single-track from west falls church, the sign’s going to say it’s 5 minutes away for like, forever.

  • JimPB

    For several years a colleague at work has used his smartphone to get the current Metrotrain performane (when trains will really be at X) schedule so that he could do a Just in Time departure for the Metrotrain stop and get on board without a wait.

    Given the increasing prevalence of smart phones and 24/7 internet connected tablets, might the “need” be for information about the URLs of the various modalities for transportation and/or an APP that would display he options and facilitate connections for obtaining performance schedules.

    • John Fontain

      You’ve hit upon why this is a complete waste of money. All of this data is already electronically available to anyone who wants it via the web.

      • CW

        I am not sure about that. There is no official app for android, only for iPhone I believe. The nexttrain site is clunky and you have to view it in a browser, pick your stop, and refresh. The bus thing is different altogether. I think that having this sort of thing that aggregates from multiple sources, does the ugly stuff on the back end, and then outputs it to a slick interface is pretty cool.

        Do you think that airports should get rid of departure/arrival boards? You can get all of that online too.

      • drax

        Except not all of us have smartphones, or carry laptops around everywhere either.

        This is simply a public sign. It’s cool. It should be in a more public place though, like next to a Metro stop on a busy street.

        • John Fontain

          ” It should be in a more public place though, like next to a Metro stop on a busy street.”

          Now you’re coming around. Putting this in a boutique coffee shop and listing the number of bikes on the rack in front of the coffee shop is a boondoggle. The County unnecessarily spent your money and mine. It might have been a very small boondoggle, but it was a boondoggle nonetheless. And after a while, these add up to real dollars.

          • drax

            Okay, John, so does this mean you support putting a screen like this in a more prominent location?

          • John Fontain

            if they were to go anywhere, they should go in the heaviest foot traffic areas near bus routes. starting in south arlington.

          • drax

            You realize my question was satirical, right? That’s okay, answering it only sweetens the pot.

          • drax

            Never mind, wrong post, sorry John.

        • waaaah

          Yeah, I don’t have a smartphone and laptop to carry around everywhere. It’s not fair that other people have them and I can’t afford to. I demand that the county board address this inequity and immediately provide subsidized smartphones and laptops to go along with subsidized affordable housing in Arlington for those of us who don’t make enough money to have everything that those who make money have. Smartphones and laptops for all!!

          • Young Condo Owner

            EXACTLY. The free market will provide those people with smart phones when they have enough to EARN them! Just like like you EARN and SAVE to buy a house, not have the county hand you one at a discount! The market works people, so does saving.

          • Justin Russo

            Do your parents also pay your cell phone bill?

          • Young Condo Owner

            Not any more.

          • Young Condo Owner

            Although, I have to ask, why would it matter? I will admit that this has been burning me up a little bit on this site. It’s not like all my friends don’t get help from their parents, too. Don’t you get it? It’s about FAMILY and FREEDOM.

          • dk

            I know, you keep saying it is all about FAMILY. So I ask you, and this is a serious question: what happens if you don’t have any FAMILY? Are you just f*cked?

            I’m not saying anyone who doesn’t have family should receive money from the government. I’m just asking you how you think about this. It sounds like you are saying that if a person doesn’t have family to help him make his way, he probably isn’t going to “make it.” But that person CAN work really hard in the hopes that doing so will benefit his descendents. Is that your philosophy? Again, just asking you to clarify.

          • drax

            Nobody complained about not having a smartphone, douche. It’s just that if you want more people to take transit and get off the roads, you have to give them easy ways to know where and when to do it, and a smartphone isn’t the only way this will work. Douche.

          • Rick

            trollolololol

          • Rick

            Doesn’t the federal govt already subsidize cell phones?

            I realize this is a joke post I’d just like to point the above fact out

    • OX4

      If you can tell me where to find an Android app that gives me Metrobus, Metrorail, ART Bus and Capital Bikeshare statuses all on one screen, I’d be happy to download it.

      • CW

        OX4, when he sends you that link (I’m sure he will in the next 5 minutes), can you forward it to me? Thanks.

        • OX4

          Yes, I will forward the APP link using my 24/7 internet connected smart phone so you will have access to the URL of your various needed transportation modalities to obtain a performance schedule.

          • CW

            Actually, never mind, JimPB just showed me how I can beam myself across the region using only jargon and acronyms. All set now.

      • John Fontain

        What a horrible life, not having all that data on one page on your smartphone.

        Your finger might get totally worn out having to click on more than one page, right?

        WPP.

        • CW

          Good Lord John, I’ve never read something so closed-minded in my life, I’m sorry.

          What are you complaining about crank-starting your car for? I have to harness up my horses.

          Well what are you complaining about harnessing up your horses for? I have to ride a wheel made out of chiseled rock.

          Caveman Grog no have rock!

          It’s called progress.

          • John Fontain

            Yep, tapping on your iphone to get transit info is comparable to the difficulty of traveling by horse and buggy. You got me!

            The funny thing is that people probably didn’t complain as much about traveling by horse and buggy back then as people are now complaining about having to tap on their iphone more than once.

            And even funnier is that before this ARLnow post, nobody was complaining about having to tap on their iphone twice. But now that they have seen this data aggregated onto a single screen, taping twice on the iphone became an instant problem (just today).

            Too funny. WPP.

          • CW

            Sure, my example was extreme and sarcastic, but as a society we’ve already gotten most of the low-hanging fruit. So we can either be happy with where we’re at, which I agree is not bad at all, or we can keep trying to innovate and see where we get. I like the latter, but it’s just a personal preference of mine.

          • John Fontain

            Look, I’m all for progress too. I just don’t think we need tax dollars being spent to develop this screen for a boutique coffee shop whose customers can all already access this data via the ipads they are perusing while drinking their beverages.

            I mean really, do we need to spend money to tell the Java Shack customers how many bikes are available on the bikeshare racks that are visible from the window of Java Shack? Really?

          • CW

            I think the idea is that they are piloting it at a place that, I would suspect, they have profiled to have a lot of “early adopters” in it (i.e. the java geeks with pockets full of Apple products). I would imagine the longer-term plan is to use the product, once the bugs are worked out, in a more public location where it could benefit all.

          • Josh S

            Oh, I can only imagine the complaining that went on about the bumpy roads, the horse sh*t everywhere, etc.

            If it was milk and honey, I doubt the car would have ever caught on.

            Complaining is universal.

            And so is thinking that your complaints are more valid than someone else’s complaints.

        • Maria

          Yes, but we’re talking “real time” here… by the time I check all the different pages I need to check, I might be one minute too late to catch that train or bus, and the next one isn’t for 15 or 20 minutes (or an hour).

          • John Fontain

            The horror!

          • IG

            LOL.

            I have a perfect solution to making sure transit shows up at the exact moment I need it so that I do not waste even one minute. It’s called my car keys.

          • John Fontain

            Oh snap!!

          • OX4

            Ahhh yea, I remember you. I walked past you during last January’s Commutageddon snowstorm, on my way to the perfectly functioning Orange Line. And I remember biking past you on CaBi while you were stuck on the streets after the earthquake. But, you have the perfect solution I see.

          • drax

            Hey IG, you do not waste even one minute?

            Bull. DC drivers waste an average of 70 hours a year in traffic, according to the Texas Transportation Institute.

            D’oh!

          • IG

            Haters hating on my transportation choices. How cute. Just telling you guys how I roll, you don’t have to like it.

            Lot of hate in this group. Wonder why?

          • cyclist

            Other than the pollution you spew into my air, IG, I don’t care how you roll. You’re not in my way. I’ll pass right by you while you’re stuck in traffic.

          • IG

            Hey, that’s OK. 99% of the time I am getting there faster than transit. I pass people shivering at the bus stop every morning, or struggling to pedal up the hill in the rain.

            Oops, that was me hating. Sorry.

          • drax

            You just THINK you’re getting there faster, IG. Tortoise and hare situation. Sometimes you’re faster, sometimes you’re not. You pay more than anyone else, that’s for sure.

            You be sure to enjoy your drive. Someday maybe it will dawn on you that it’s in your interest for those people to take transit so they won’t drive on the roads, in front of you, so bashing transit is a stupid idea. Must be all those fumes eating your brain cells.

          • IG

            Not bashing transit. I appreciate the transit riders’ sacrifice of waiting around for late buses and trains so they stay out of my way and let me get to my destination faster.

            They are my heroes, truly.

          • OX4

            I don’t hate you at all, IG. Just trying to convince you that your car is a massive 2,000-lb burden and is not as necessary, or convenient, as you might think.

          • drax

            There you go with that “faster” thing again, IG. LOL! 70 hours.

          • IG

            Oh drax, how about you add up all the time spend sitting in traffic on buses, or waiting in subway tunnels for trains to cross at Rosslyn, or waiting on crowded platforms for 2 or 3 trains to pass because they are too crowded for anyone to get on or having to offload a train because a door jammed and waiting for 2 or 3 more trains to come. How much would that add up to per year?

            Your points are not unique and you do a poor job of arguing your point by using them.

          • Maria

            I didn’t say it was horrible. I was pointing out why some people might find it useful. But yeah, when it’s midnight and I miss a bus by 2 minutes and the next one isn’t for an hour, I admit I’m pretty irritated.

          • Andrew

            is java shack open at midnight?

          • John Fontain

            Are you saying you couldn’t start looking at your iphone for the train schedule 2 minutes earlier to ensure you won’t miss the train?

          • Maria

            ….

            I can’t even tell if that’s a serious comment?

          • Rick

            “my air”

            LOL

          • John Fontain

            And really Maria, how many people are likely to be departing the Java Shack without arleady having decided their means of transportation? You make it sound like it’s the norm for people not to choose their method of transportation until they are walking out the door.

          • OX4

            John, I make a last-minute decision between walking, CaBi, and Metro all the time. Why is that so hard to believe? If there are no bikes available, I’ll hop on the Metro. If the Metro is 8+ minutes away, I might walk. If it’s raining I might grab the Circulator.

          • drax

            Yeah, John, that’s life with options.

          • John Fontain

            You must have missed this part “departing the Java Shack”.

          • OX4

            Oh stop it. My comment applies to every place in between Ballston and DC. Do I really have to spell this stuff out for you?

          • John Fontain

            OX4, you are the exception, not the norm.

          • OX4

            Ok, fair enough I suppose.

          • CW

            The fact that house prices are about 2-3 times higher on the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor as opposed to, say, the Pike, indicates that in fact OX4′s reliance upon transit may not be the exception. Hmm, what did that section of the County have 30 years ago that the Pike didn’t that may have made things turn out that way? Also, sometime when the metro is all shot to hell in the morning and trains are backed up completely, check the crowds at the 38B stops. You might be surprised.

          • Maria

            You ought to pick what you’re arguing against… is it the Java Shack placement or the technology in general? Because if it’s the Java Shack thing, I suggest it’s time to get over it. It’s a test area. It’s not the only place it will ever be.

            If it’s the technology, it can, in fact, be very helpful to those of us without a solid transportation plan every second of the day, especially when we’re just out casually running errands or getting a drink. I haven’t worked out a matrix of scheduled arrival times, nor do I have a smart phone, so this technology would be very helpful to me. I leave many places in Arlington not knowing exactly which way I will travel. Like OX4 said, it all depends on how close each method of transportation is to where I am at that moment. There have been many times that I’m riding down the Clarendon metro escalator to check the next train sign while on the metro hotline checking the next bus time. It may not be the norm, but just because YOU don’t do it doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of people who do.

          • Clarendude

            @Maria – “I leave many places in Arlington not knowing exactly which way I will travel.”

            And, here I thought I was the only one !

          • drax

            How do you know he’s the exception?

            12% of Arlingtonians don’t even own a car.

    • IG

      The problem with aggregating all of that data into an app is that they do not follow a consistent data format. For years, Alpert has used his position on the RAC to advocate for open data and compliance standards out of WMATA to provide programmers with the opportunity to serve this info to users in a uniform way. Now he is part of a company looking to profit off the data.

    • Maria

      I think the difference is that these screens are customized for the place where they are located. It tells you about the closest train and bus stops instead of you having to input a bunch of info or walk up to the bus stop sign and enter the number. Are the latter difficult to do? No, but as I said in a different comment, this is about “real time.” The time spent entering info to your phone (or, in the case of people like me whose phone isn’t exactly “smart,” calling the metro hotline… I know, I know) can be the difference between one bus and another an hour later.

    • charlie

      i don’t know how it works on the train but for the bus it stinks –
      all it does is tell you the regular schedule — or when the bus SHOULD be there. I know when the bus SHOULD be there and it ISN”T, I want to know WHEN it will be here.

  • ArlingtonCountyTaxpayer

    nothing is free.
    developers pay fees to ACCS to play these games. the developers get the money from charging you more for your apartment. you have paid for these. go enjoy it.

    but why can’t we put something like this at the top of the METRO station — I would love to know how long I have to get down to the Courthouse Metro Platform and if I should George Costanza it or take my time.

    • John Fontain

      I believe they intentionally don’t put them at the entrance in order to keep people from sprinting down the stairs/escalators and getting hurt.

      • Josh S

        Well, they are at mezzanine level in several metro stations, so if that’s the reason, it’s being inconsistently applied.

        • Greg

          I think though, that the mezzanine signs don’t give times for trains that are less than 3 minutes away. People would run down the escalator if they saw “Orange – Vienna – ARR”. I know it’s like that at Metro center.

          • Josh S

            Yeah they do.

          • Greg

            It might depend on the station. It definitely doesn’t show trains that are approaching at my entrance at Metro Center.

      • OX4

        Yea I never figured this out either. Rosslyn gives Orange and Blue status when you walk into the mezzanine. But the entrance I use at Metro Center only gives Red — you need to go downstairs to see the O/B status.

        • Dick_Richardson

          The arrival monitors at the top/mezzanine level of stations doesn’t show trains arriving within about 3 minutes, depending on the station. I assume because if you don’t know about a train about to arrive, you won’t run for it. Always pissed me off though.

        • Juanita de Talmas

          Metro Signs: What Einstein decided to only list three trains when most stations have have four directions. One more example of Metro not thinking things through.

      • Steamboat Willie

        It sounds like you might believe anything.

      • novasteve

        More likely they don’t want you to turn away and take alternative transport by being discouraged by the wait time.

        • charlie

          oh yeah.
          one time.
          crystal city station.
          taking Metro to Nationals Game.
          in the station — 27 Minute wait for yellow line.
          METRO got our party of five fare — but we left. And DROVE.

  • JamesE

    It’s a waste of money because everyone goes to Java Shack on their fixed gear bicycle, not public transportation.

    • Shack-a-lack

      Yeah, that group is a little much, I agree. Beware on weekend mornings!

    • bobco85

      Ugh, fixed gear bicycles. Not a fan of regression (giving up the technology of multiple gears to use an inefficient single gear). It’s as if people were to say, “We’re going to be cool and become Amish!” Nobody says that.

      • John Book

        I once pretended to be Amish in order to protect a young boy named Samuel who was witness to a murder in Philadelphia.

        • OX4

          Look, Your Worshipfulness, let’s get one thing straight. I take orders from just one person: me.

          wait…wrong Amish movie.

        • Roy Munson

          Really, I once pretended to be Amish to try and convince an Amish guy to become a pro bowler for my personal gain. Probably not as noble as reason as you John Book.

          • http://www.exactcom.com.au/proofs/KombiPics/Wrecks/bayBushOvergrown.jpg Overgrown Bush

            Nice movie reference. I especially loved the chick who played TV’s Weird Science character, Lisa.

  • Clarencourt Neighbor

    It would be a better use of County money to improve public access to wifi networks so people can get this same information on their smartphones. They have public wifi in Court House plaza, though the signal is pretty weak.

    • CW

      What a great point, if a bit tangential. I wonder when the day will come when wireless becomes a public utility? Yes, there would be pros and cons, and a lot of people would always say that the free market could do it better, but it sure would be sweet if major metro areas had wifi networks in their densest regions. I don’t know a lot about telecon protocols, security, etc. so I am not sure if this is realistic.

      • novasteve

        Oh great, more of my tax money used for handouts. I fpeople are so “poor” and need my taxmoney, why are they wasting money on electronic equipement? Or will the libbies handout cellphones and ipads to the “poor” as well? I guess that would buy them lots of votes.

        • drax

          Nobody said it would be a free public utility, steve. None are.

          Dial down the reactionary stuff a notch.

      • Suburban Not Urban

        That’s not gonna happen – too much money on the table for telecom companies. If you look up the national broadband initiative, you can see how badly they’ve messed up initiatives like this.

        • Clarencourt Neighbor

          I think that eventually, at least in major areas, it will become a public utility. I know that efforts to expand broadband reach have been bogged down by lots of problems, but I think that particularly as more and more people who would really need the service as a public utility are getting Internet access through their personally-owned devices (and cable companies raise prices on access to offset decreasing numbers of cable subscribers), there is a stronger argument for trying to find a way to make public wifi work.

          • CW

            Thanks for the perspective. Do you know of any groups (private or public) that are working on this? I remember reading a couple business plans or case studies a long time ago on companies that were trying to develop wifi grids where the individual transmitters served as relays for each other (this was mostly for the developing world).

            Of course, the data has to come from somewhere. This is where my lack of knowledge of telecom fails me. The in-ground network is legally monopolized, more or less, no?

          • drax

            Arlington already has several free wifi hotspots provided by the county:

            http://www.arlingtonva.us/departments/Communications/PressReleases/page70872.aspx

            But obviously this is a limited area.

  • Nick

    Here is the WMATA URL to bookmark for a blackberry or other smartphone: http://www.wmata.com/rider_tools/pids/showpid.cfm?station_id=21.

    This is for gallery place, but you can select a different station and bookmark that one (or the two or three you use most often). That way before you go underground and lose your signal you know whether to saunter to sprint.

    • John Fontain

      Nick, thanks for the link but you obviously miss the point. It is much too hard for people to enter that address into their favorites list on their 4G LTE smartphone with gorilla glass and to tap on that favorite to see the metro schedule. Instead, we need the government to do it for us. Besides, who has time to interrupt their game of Words with Friends.

      • Francis P. Dunnington

        We don’t need the county government to “do it for us”, but it would be great to have that data aggregated in one place.

        In the meantime, when you want to communicate the same message to 10 of your friends, have fun writing that letter 10 times, applying postage to each one, and getting the letters over to the post office.

        I choose to compose an email, CC the 10 recipients, and click “send.” It’s called progress…

        • drax

          If the recipient doesn’t have email, you don’t reach them.

          You can blame them for that, sure, but it’s still true.

          If you want people to ride the bus, there’s nothing wrong with trying to reach those who don’t have smartphones. It’s not that much money. It’s like putting up signs, which are also low tech, you know.

          • John Fontain

            “If you want people to ride the bus, there’s nothing wrong with trying to reach those who don’t have smartphones.”

            BREAKING NEWS……This just in to the news desk….we have one of our ace reporters, DRAX, on the scene….let’s go live to DRAX for his report….

            DRAX here….Details are still sketchy…..But I’ve just been informed, and this may come as a shock to many of our viewers,…..that Arlingtonians who don’t have smartphones aren’t aware that buses are available for public transportation….

          • drax

            Um, wut?

            You were really really hilarious there with all that snarkiness, but then you forgot to make sense.

          • Maria

            I don’t think John understands that the purpose of this technology isn’t to inform people that the options EXIST but to inform people of the specific arrival times OF the options in the immediate area. I’m also not sure he’s ever taken a bus or he would realize that knowing they exist does not equal knowing when they will arrive at any given stop.

  • charlie

    BY THE WAY —

    Big THANKS to Java Shack for doing their part. They should be your ONLY source for COFFEE.

  • Rick

    This will let all the hipsters in there know how they will get to doing nothing for the rest of the day even quicker than before!

    How many times has nextbus been resurrected and scrapped because WMATA couldn’t figure it out? One of those four-sided boxes with the scheduled stop times would be a hell of a lot cheaper than this…

  • http://tutorialsmad.com Asho

    Money!!! Money!!! Money!!! Taxpayers money are going like this…

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