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by Chris Teale September 21, 2017 at 2:00 pm 0

The long-awaited Dudley’s Sport & Ale in Shirlington appears to be moving closer to opening after months of delays.

In a Facebook post earlier this week, owner Reese Gardner said the inside of the sports bar at 2766 S. Arlington Mill Drive is “85 [percent] completed and we are just waiting for the final finishes.”

Gardner said those finishes cannot be done until after the steel arrives and welding is finished. The steel is scheduled to be delivered on October 14, he said. After that, an opening date could become clearer.

“We understand the frustration and trust us we want to be open as much as you want us open,” Gardner wrote. In the comments on the post, would-be customers wondered whether Dudley’s would open before the end of football season.

The sports bar had planned to open last year, but struggled with permitting issues and other delays.

A 28-seat bar, a 125-seat dining area, and a “stadium style” viewing area are planned, as well as a rooftop bar — Shirlington’s first — with a game area, a 15-seat bar, and patio seating for about 114 people.

Dudley's update: We wanted to give everyone a brief update on where we are out with the build out. The interior is 85…

Posted by Dudley's Sport and Ale on Tuesday, September 19, 2017

by ARLnow.com Sponsor September 21, 2017 at 1:15 pm 0

Healthy Paws

Editor’s Note: Healthy Paws is a column sponsored and written by the owners of Clarendon Animal Care, a full-service, general practice veterinary clinic and winner of a 2017 Arlington Chamber of Commerce Best Business Award. The clinic is located 3000 10th Street N., Suite B. and can be reached at 703-997-9776.

We’ve discussed fleas previously, but since we’re just starting to see the first real fleas of the season figured it’s a good time to revisit these icky insects.

What exactly is a flea?

Fleas are small (~2-3mm), reddish-brown insects. They feed on the blood of mammals and birds. While they cannot fly, they have incredible jumping ability. According to the website fleascience.com, the average flea can jump about 5 inches high and 9 inches horizontally, though they can reach 8 inches high and nearly 20 inches horizontally.

What diseases can they carry?

Fleas can cause symptoms of mild itchiness to severe itching/scratching and significant secondary bacterial infections, depending both on the flea burden and the individual animal’s sensitivity to flea bites. Additionally, in young puppies and kittens, or severely infested animals, fleas can cause anemia due to blood loss.

Other parasites and diseases can also be carried or transmitted by fleas:

  • The most common form of tapeworms, Diplydium caninum, are carried by fleas. Tapeworms are rarely a significant health concern but can be uncomfortable to the pet and disturbing to the owner who discovers them.
  • Bartonella, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, is also carried by fleas. Typical transmission is from the scratch of an infected cat (who got the disease from fleas), but there is some thought that infected fleas can transmit directly to humans via a bite.
  • Plague, caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, can also be transmitted by fleas.

What is the lifecycle of the flea? And why does it matter?

Adult female fleas feeding on an animal can start laying eggs within hours, laying up to 50 eggs per day. Eggs develop in the environment, preferring cool dark places (like under fallen leaves — which is why we tend to see an increase in cases of flea infestations in the fall) and indoors along baseboards, carpets and crevices of furniture or floors.

Larvae then develop into pupae, typically preferring the same places as the larval stages. Finally, adults emerge from the pupal stage and start looking for a host to feed on. This whole process can take as little as a few weeks in optimal conditions. However, the larval and pupal stages can also lie dormant for months, and hatch only once they sense the environmental factors are ideal (vibrations from movement, heat and CO2 can all trigger this).

Because of the prodigious egg-laying of the adult flea, it is possible for a single adult female to quickly lead to an infestation. The environment (which can be outdoors or indoors) quickly becomes contaminated with eggs, larvae and pupae.

How do I know if my pet has fleas?

Sometimes you will actually see the flea moving along the skin under the hair coat, or even jumping from the pet as you rub their belly. A more reliable way to detect them is to look for “flea dirt,” which is digested and excreted blood. The tail area and behind the ears are two common places to see this.

However, sometimes it’s not a simple diagnosis, especially early on. Some pets are very sensitive to flea bites, and will demonstrate intense itching with only a single bite — in these cases, it may be difficult to detect the fleas.

The classic signs of a pet with fleas are intense itching or chewing around the tail base (and in general). The itch associated with fleas is often more intense than we might see with other causes of itchiness (namely, allergies). (more…)

by Progressive Voice September 21, 2017 at 12:30 pm 0

Progressive Voice is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of their organizations or ARLnow.com.

By Krysta Jones

A few years ago I had the pleasure of being invited to serve on the Women’s Monument Commission of Virginia, which is leading awareness and fundraising efforts for a first of its kind monument on the Capitol Grounds in Richmond. The monument will honor 12 women who have made an impact in Virginia.

Coincidentally, the monument is scheduled for completion just shy of 2020, when we will celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment that gave women the right to vote. There are several initiatives around the country to highlight and share years of research exploring how a movement of a diverse group of women fighting for the right to vote succeeded in securing the right to vote – primarily for white women.

After the Women’s March in January 2017, which galvanized a new energy and birthed a growing crop of activists, I have been even more aware of divergent movements within the women’s movement. While some saw the march as an opportunity to celebrate all women, others were disappointed with the lack of diversity among the organizers and the attendees.

It is no surprise that the “women’s movement” has been historically been run by white females, often older, who have become the stalwarts and spokespeople for what it means to fight for equal pay, reproductive rights, affordable childcare, or other traditional women’s issues.

As I have worked to motivate more women from all backgrounds to take an active interest and leadership role in all fields, and advocate for women’s issues, I have always noticed that many don’t see women like themselves on the front lines. While it is true that there is something special about seeing yourself in those who lead, it’s even more important for the overall good and progress of society to build relationships and learn from those who are different from ourselves.

The Women’s Monument Commission of Virginia seeks to do just that. The Commission selected women to honor with a view toward diversity of races, professional backgrounds, ages, time periods and geography. A major goal was to help us move past traditional stereotypes of what it means to be a woman leader.

When people walk up to the monument and read or hear about each statue, we want them to see some of themselves — as well as people different from themselves — as they reflect on the accomplishments of the women honored and at the same time reflect on what they can aspire to in their own lives.

Some of the women featured in the monument include:

Maggie L. Walker, who was one of the great entrepreneurs of her time and, with the founding of the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank in Richmond, the first woman to charter a bank in the United States.

Cockacoeske, who was a Pamunkey chief and an astute politician and ruled the Pamunkey for 30 years until her death in 1686. As Chief, she signed the Treaty of Middle Plantation on May 29, 1677, restoring important rights to native Virginia tribes and commemorated in an annual ceremony among the chiefs of the Mattaponi and Pamunkey tribes and the Governor of Virginia during Thanksgiving week in November. 

Laura Lu Copenhaver, who as Director of Information of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation helped expand southwestern Virginia’s agricultural economy by emphasizing cooperative marketing of farm products to improve the standard of living for farm families.

On October 4 at the Woman’s Club of Arlington, I will moderate a conversation with former State Senator (and former Arlington County Board chair) Mary Margaret Whipple about her leadership journey, her service as Commission vice chair, and stories of the women who will be featured with statues as part of the monument.

My hope is that we can encourage additional dialogue in Arlington in advance of the completion of the monument to inspire an appreciation and celebration of the true power of all women.

Krysta Jones is founder and CEO of the Virginia Leadership Institute and former Chair of the Arlington Commission on the Status of Women. In 2014, Krysta was named by Leadership Arlington as a Top 40 Leaders Under 40 awardee.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor September 21, 2017 at 11:45 am 0

How is a wedding gown like a bomb suit? Why are shrimp more dangerous to sailors than sharks? Why is a zipper a problem for a sniper?

On Wednesday, September 27, join economist Tyler Cowen and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University for a conversation with “America’s funniest science writer,” Mary Roach. The conversation is part of the Mercatus Center’s Conversations with Tyler event series, and will be open to the public. A book signing will immediately follow the event.

Click here to register.

Roach’s latest book is Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War. Grunt examines the science behind keeping soldiers’ bodies and minds intact, alert, and sane in the extreme conditions that come with war.

Like Roach’s other books, Grunt combines fascinating science with the perfect amount of humor and accessibility to explore life’s most interesting peculiarities. Roach’s work isn’t afraid to “go there” as she explores taboo topics such as sex, the nitty gritty of life in space, dead bodies, and what happens to food after you eat it.

Roach’s perspective frequently comes from a first-hand experience as she offers up herself — and sometimes her husband — to participate in unconventional science experiments, including agreeing to wear ultrasound equipment during coitus.

In Conversations with Tyler, economist and George Mason University professor Tyler Cowen explores the world of ideas in one-on-one dialogues with today’s top thinkers. Past guests include Lawrence H. Summers, Malcolm Gladwell, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Atul Gawande.

Mary Roach’s skillful wit and creative approach to science makes her the perfect candidate for a conversation with Tyler. Come prepared to laugh, learn, and unlock some of life’s most interesting mysteries.

Register for the event here.

by Chris Teale September 21, 2017 at 11:00 am 0

Capitol City Brewing Company in Shirlington is preparing to host its 18th annual Mid-Atlantic Oktoberfest on Saturday, September 30.

The Teutonic, beer-filled festivities last from noon to 7 p.m. at The Village at Shirlington and close Campbell Avenue to traffic for most of the day.

For those imbibing, the cost of admission is $30, which includes a wristband, tasting glass and 10 drink tickets. Additional drink tickets are available for $2 each, with a five-ticket minimum. Admission is free for children and non-drinkers.

More than 65 breweries from around the region and 30 local restaurants will offer German food, more than 100 beers on tap, traditional music and Alpine dancing, according to organizers. And Capitol City will host its “Best Fest” competition, where a panel of judges will crown the best Oktoberfest-style beer.

More from a press release:

Willkommen! Capitol City Brewing Company is gearing up for its 18th annual Mid-Atlantic Oktoberfest celebration. On Saturday, September 30, more than 65 regional breweries and 30 local restaurants will serve up their best fares at this year’s Oktobefest celebration. The eighteenth annual event runs from noon to 7 p.m. at The Village at Shirlington. Ticket sales begin at 11:30 a.m. and beer taps close at 6 p.m. Entrance is free for children and non-drinkers.

Enjoy a “familiennachmittag” or family afternoon like they do in Munich, Germany. Capitol City invites beer-drinkers and festivalgoers alike to dress in traditional German garb and enjoy the tastes of authentic Bavarian brews, bratwurst and brezlen – the German-style pretzel. More than 65 local breweries will set up over 100 taps and share ale and lager samples with the thousands of anticipated guests from the DMV region.  Notable breweries include Fairwinds, DC Brau, Hardywood, Heroic, Port City, 3 Notch’d, James River, Heritage, Atlas and Caboose.

Capitol City will offer samples of its featured fall beers, including the classic Oktoberfest Lager and a new signature brew, the Grumpkins & Snarks Pumpkin Ale. Festivalgoers can enjoy Alpine music while they taste authentic German cuisine and other American fare from various local eateries.

Capitol City Brewing Company will again hold a BEST FEST competition for Oktoberfest-style beers. A panel of judges, all certified by the Beer Judgment Certification Program, BJCP, will taste and vote on the top Oktoberfest brew at the festival. Best Fest awards will be announced at 2 p.m.

The $30 admission ticket for beer drinkers includes an official Oktoberfest wristband, a Capitol City branded tasting glass, and 10 drink tickets. Additional drink tickets are available for purchase for $2 each with a five-ticket minimum. Admission is free for non-drinkers. Beer-drinkers must be 21+ to purchase a ticket. DC 101 is sponsoring the eighteenth annual Capitol City Oktoberfest.

Capitol City’s Oktoberfest Beer Selections:

Grumpkins & Snarks Pumpkin Ale:  6.2% ABV 20 IBU  A malty amber colored ale with Red Crystal Rye and Golden Naked Oats, flavored with over 120 lbs of spiced pumpkin butter made in house from locally grown Jarrahdale Pumpkins from Brookefield Pumpkins.  Gently hopped with Saaz for a true fall treat.

Oktoberfest:  5.5% ABV  25 IBU  An easy drinking fall lager, brewed with Pilsner, Vienna, Munich, and CaraMunich malts then moderately hopped with German noble hops.  Full and rich malt profile, lovely copper hue; perfect for the fall season!

For more information on Capitol City Brewing Company, please visit: www.capcitybrew.com. Find Capitol City Brewing Company on Facebook: www.facebook.com/CapCityBrew and on Twitter: @CapCityBrewers.

Courtesy photos.

by Peter Rousselot September 21, 2017 at 10:15 am 0

Peter RousselotPeter’s Take is a weekly opinion column. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARLnow.com.

At its September 16 meeting, the County Board rejected a staff proposal to light two synthetic turf fields at Williamsburg Middle School.

Discussion

In rejecting staff’s ill-considered WMS field-lighting proposal, the Board, led by members John Vihstadt and Christian Dorsey, wisely relied on advice the Board received from the Planning Commission, Parks Commission, Williamsburg Fields Site Evaluation Workgroup, Environment and Energy Conservation Commission, and hundreds of citizens from all across Arlington.

County staff’s efforts to install field lights at WMS got off on the wrong foot and stayed there. As the Board acknowledged in 2013, WMS neighborhood residents were “ambushed” by County staff.

Four years of misguided staff efforts reveal deficiencies in civic engagement, policy, and management. These deficiencies (e.g., reliance on a sole-source lighting vendor, mandating lights at every synthetic turf field) are documented in the commission reports.

Future community hopes regarding civic engagement rest on Assistant County Manager Bryna Helfer’s team developing and implementing new approaches to rectify these past staff failures.

Issues relating to policy and management are summarized in the Planning Commission’s letter to the Board. For example, in explaining why she could not vote for lighting the WMS fields now, commissioner Nancy Iacomini noted:

“[T]he County does not have siting principles for lighted fields nor does it have implementation criteria about how the lighting would be achieved. …There is nothing the community can look to for direction on where fields should be lit and how they should be lit.”

Commission chair Erik Gutshall concurred, observing that:

“He cannot find how lighting the fields and the intensity of use into the night will not impact the neighborhood. However, it is irresponsible for the County to not find field space somewhere and the POPS process should outline specific decision criteria for siting and implementation and mitigation for field lighting. He would support lights at this site in the future if a deliberate process determined this is the best site for lights. He believes other options will be found.”

Even commissioner Stephen Hughes — the only one out of 10 Planning Commissioners who voted in favor of lighting now — agreed that “the processes — both the County’s and APS’ — were wrong and broken.”

Conclusion

WMS neighbors are not selfish NIMBY fanatics. They simply chose to live in an area in which it’s currently quiet and dark at night, and in which some of their homes are located less than 100 feet from the WMS fields. Wildlife abound.

As “Green Space Fan” noted in a comment to last week’s ARLnow.com lighting story:

“15-20 times as much playing time can be added by installing safe synthetic turf and less polluting lights at Kenmore, installing synthetic turf on lighted grass fields at TJ, Quincy & Gunston and building a new lighted field at Long Bridge without starting a war between the sports community & folks who live in all parts of the County, including apartments, townhouses & single-family homes.”

As both Gutshall and “Green Space Fan” have suggested, the County now transparently must adopt:

  • proper lighting criteria
  • with a county-wide focus
  • balancing sports use with neighborhood character

That ought to result in lighting some other fields throughout Arlington, but not lighting fields at WMS.

Finally, the County Board must take the lead in enacting reforms to correct the numerous policy and management failures documented in the commission reports.

by ARLnow.com September 21, 2017 at 9:15 am 0

A new Silver Diner restaurant will be opening in Ballston.

The 6,700-square-foot eatery will join Target and Enterprise Rent-A-Car as retail tenants in the currently under-construction 750 N. Glebe development. Set to open in 2020, 750 N. Glebe will be a 12-story building with nearly 500 apartments, across from Ballston Quarter mall.

The new Ballston location will be the 14th Silver Diner in the D.C. area. The company has an existing Arlington location at 3200 Wilson Blvd in the Clarendon area.

The Washington Business Journal reports that, at least for now, Silver Diner plans to operate both Arlington locations simultaneously. (It has a long-term lease in Clarendon.)

Current plans are to operate both Ballston and Clarendon, although [Silver Diner founder Bob] Giaimo has acknowledged in the past that site where the Clarendon Silver Diner sits at 3200 Wilson Blvd., would likely be the subject of redevelopment at some point, putting the diner’s future there in flux.

More about the lease signing from a Ballston Business Improvement District press release, after the jump.

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by ARLnow.com September 21, 2017 at 8:15 am 0

County Board Stalls on VRE Decision — The Arlington County Board, at a Tuesday meeting that stretched into early Wednesday morning, declined to endorse one of the options for a proposed new Virginia Railway Express station in Crystal City. VRE officials, county staff, the Arlington Chamber of Commerce and Arlington’s Transportation Commission backed Option 2, which places the station closer to the Crystal City Metro station and transit center. Some local condominium residents and the Planning Commission, citing concerns about noise, wanted Option 3 — which places the station behind an office building — to be considered as well. [InsideNova, InsideNova]

Michelle Obama Stops By Arlington for Salon Opening — Former first lady Michelle Obama and her Secret Service entourage were among “a crowd of about 40 VIPs” who came to Arlington Tuesday night for the opening of a new salon. The business, Aesthetics Salon, is owned by stylist Yene Damtew, who was part of Obama’s “glam squad” while she was in the White House. Aesthetics Salon is located at 2412 26th Road S. in the Long Branch Creek neighborhood just south of I-395. [Washington Post]

Clarendon Day Closures — Expect lots of road closures in central Clarendon on Saturday for the annual Clarendon Day festival, which is taking place from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. On Sunday morning Wilson Blvd will be closed from Clarendon to Rosslyn for the Clarendon Day 5K, 10K and Kids Dash races. [Arlington County, Arlington County]

More on Proposed Columbia Pike Bus Revamp — “Recently Metro unveiled the latest proposed changes to the Metrobus network which includes a major restructuring to the 16 series bus lines on Columbia Pike in Arlington. The long-awaited restructuring is aimed at simplifying and improving bus service in the corridor.” [Greater Greater Washington]

County Seeking Pike Bus Feedback — While WMATA continues to collect feedback on the proposed Columbia Pike bus changes via an online survey, a public meeting is scheduled tonight (Thursday) to discuss the changes in person with residents. The meeting is taking place at the Arlington Mill Community Center from 6-8 p.m. [Arlington County]

Local Nonprofit Lender Steps Up Loan Volume — “Arlington-based Capital Impact Partners said Wednesday it provided $75 million in private financing in the second quarter of 2017, the largest quarterly loan volume in its history. The nonprofit community development financial institution backs projects that support increased access to health care, education, affordable housing and healthy food in the United States.” [Washington Business Journal]

Flickr pool photo by Alan Kotok

by ARLnow.com Sponsor September 21, 2017 at 6:00 am 0

Walk in the door at Next Phase Arlington any time of day and you’ll be greeted with the kind of enthusiasm and energy that comes exclusively from people busy doing what they love. Creating a “Happy Place” for the Arlington community is Next Phase’s #1 priority — they just happen to be a kick-ass fitness studio, too.

Located in the Courthouse neighborhood, at 2009 14th Street N., Next Phase’s class schedule boasts a heart-thumping lineup of high intensity interval training (HIIT) classes including TRX, Tabata, Barre and something they like to call HIIT Pilates: Pilates reformer training partnered with high intensity intervals for a well-rounded, albeit sweaty, workout.

But sweaty group exercise classes (and smiles) are not all Next Phase brings to the Arlington scene. Offering in-house nutritionists and personal trainers, Next Phase also designs customized programs built to nurture optimum health and happiness on an individual level. Consultations are free, and the programs are intentionally developed to serve each individual’s needs.

Best of all, Next Phase offers all of these services without the commitment of a membership — no strings attached. Sure, you can subscribe to their monthly unlimited plan, but they’ll pause your account whenever you ask them to or cancel it with no questions asked or charging fees. Next Phase wants you to be happy and healthy — all the other stuff is flexible.

This boutique fitness studio offers more than impressive, innovative instructors and fitness class formats. The Next Phase community will elevate you, encourage you to keep moving when you think you can’t and then sit down and have a beer with you.

This is no joke – just yesterday Next Phase crushed their Tabata workout outside Courthaus Social and then headed to happy hour. They were also out on the town over the weekend, demoing their signature Super Circuit at Discover Arlington’s Wellness + Fitness Festival. But, if this is the first you’re hearing about Next Phase, it’s all good – you can stop by the studio any time of day, and you’re sure to be greeted like family.

Curious yet? Your first class is always free. Create an account to access your free class, and bring a friend.

by Chris Teale September 20, 2017 at 4:30 pm 0

A pet store and grooming center will replace a longtime seafood shop near the Lee Heights Shops, according to county permits.

American Seafood at 4550 Lee Highway closed on December 31 last year after nearly 35 years in business.

And while none of its signs have been removed yet, permits indicate that work will be done to completely renovate the building. County planning staff approved the business license for the new pet store on September 12.

The Lee Heights Shops have seen some turnover in recent times, with long-time local stores Bradshaw’s Children’s Shoes and Lemon Twist closing late last year.

Lemon Twist was replaced by women’s clothing and accessories store Lemoncello Boutique. Bradshaw’s still has not been replaced.

by ARLnow.com September 20, 2017 at 3:45 pm 0

A planned redevelopment project in Clarendon has yet to have its groundbreaking.

It was nearly two years ago that the Arlington County Board approved developer Shooshan Company’s plan for a two-phase redevelopment of the Red Top Cab headquarters in Clarendon. Billed as an “ambitious redevelopment,” the project will replace low-slung commercial buildings and surface parking lots with up to 580 housing units and 3,477 square feet of retail space while significantly reshaping the western end of Clarendon.

As of today, it is still business as usual at Red Top Cab, which promised to continue serving Arlington after it eventually moves its headquarters. No construction equipment or other signs of progress are visible.

A Shooshan executive did not respond to a request for comment. A Red Top Cab rep said that “work is still being done on development plans.”

by Chris Teale September 20, 2017 at 2:45 pm 0

For the first time in its decade-long history, the National Chamber Ensemble will play concerts at venues other than Rosslyn’s Spectrum Theatre (1611 N. Kent Street), starting next month.

Arlington Cultural Affairs Division director Michelle Isabelle-Stark said the county’s lease on the theater expired in July, and they took “immediate steps” to help find new spaces in which the group can perform.

So instead of performing at the theater, which it has done since its founding in 2007, the NCE will perform its five 2017-2018 season concerts at the Gunston Arts Center (2700 S. Lang Street) and the Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington (4444 Arlington Blvd).

The ensemble performs chamber music — classical music composed for a small group of instruments in a more intimate setting.

NCE’s season of concerts begins on Saturday, October 14 at Gunston Arts Center with a program called, “Night in the Garden of Spain” featuring a celebration of Spanish classical music and dance.

For NCE leaders, finding space similar to the Spectrum proved challenging.

“It was hard to find a space comparable to the Spectrum, because the Spectrum is a perfect size for chamber music,” said NCE artistic director Leo Sushansky. “Most of the other auditoriums in Arlington, they’re very large school auditoriums. So the Gunston Arts Center is probably the closest to the Spectrum in size, but it was only available for two concerts.”

The Spectrum Theatre is set to be torn down during the first phase of the Rosslyn Plaza Project along with two apartment buildings and four office buildings.

In its place would be 2.5 million square feet of space across five buildings, including 1.8 million square feet of office, 550 residential units, 200 hotel rooms and 45,000 square feet of retail space. And the space once occupied by Artisphere in the same building is set to be a co-working space, opening this fall.

But Sushansky said while having to play in new venues incurs extra costs from rentals, transporting instruments and the like, it will help them show off their talents to more people.

“I’m hoping it’ll bring us into different neighborhoods, bring attention to a different audience,” he said. “It will help bring about some interesting collaborations.”

But the closure of the Spectrum left Sushansky to bemoan the lack of dedicated performance spaces in Arlington outside of the county’s schools.

“The county has been very supportive all these years, and they continue to be so,” he said. “It’s just there’s a problem in Arlington with not enough performance spaces. There’s really no concert hall in Arlington. The Spectrum was the only one. Now that has gone and all that are left are school auditoriums.”

Isabelle-Stark said that such groups can be creative with their venue choices, as it gives them different environments to perform in and introduces their work to more people.

“As they say when one door closes another one opens,” she said. “[Alternative] venues for performance, such as churches, shopping malls, and airports, to name a few, provide opportunities for performers to stretch creatively and cultivate new audiences.”

Photo No. 1: courtesy photo. Photo No. 3 via Google Maps.

by Chris Teale September 20, 2017 at 2:00 pm 0

A new hotel replacing the former Colony House Furniture Store in Rosslyn is starting to take shape, several years after its approval by the Arlington County Board.

The Hilton Homewood Suites at 1700 Lee Highway will be eight stories high with 168 rooms. Below ground will be two levels of parking, containing 102 spaces. The Board approved the plan by developer B.F. Saul in 2013.

As of Tuesday, the hotel’s main structure appeared to be finished, with work continuing inside on the future guest rooms, parking garage, loading bay and front entrance area. The hotel is close to the Rosslyn Vue condo building, but the trees between the two properties act as a shield of sorts between them.

On a web page about the project, B.F. Saul said the hotel is “scheduled to open in the near future.” Representatives with the company did not respond to requests for additional comment.

B.F. Saul said guests can expect “a focus on comfort and functionality” in an extended-stay hotel designed to be “guests’ home away from home while in the DC region for business or pleasure.”

“Sustainability is at the forefront of its design, construction and operation,” the page reads. “The suites offer large work areas, well-appointed bathrooms, digital flat screen televisions, fully-equipped kitchens, and an upscale, yet warm, home-like décor. The hotel will feature 1,400 square feet of highly flexible meeting space, and a best-of-class, 1,100 square foot fitness facility with state of the art equipment. The hotel will also feature a pool, spa, trail bicycles, and an outdoor patio equipped with a gas fireplace and built-in grill.”

by ARLnow.com September 20, 2017 at 1:00 pm 0

A man ran up to a jogger on the Mt. Vernon Trail and groped her, according to this week’s Arlington County Police Department crime report.

The incident happened around lunchtime last Wednesday, on the trail near Rosslyn.

Police searched for the suspect but were unable to locate him.

More from the ACPD crime report:

SEXUAL BATTERY, 2017-09130162, Mount Vernon Trail. At approximately 2:07 p.m. on September 13, police were dispatched to the intersection of Lynn Street at Lee Highway for the late report of a sexual battery. Upon arrival, it was determined that at approximately 12:30 p.m. on September 13, a female victim was running on the Mount Vernon Trail when an unknown male suspect approached her from behind and inappropriately touched her. Once the victim called out for help, the suspect fled the area on foot. The suspect is described as a light-skinned Hispanic male, 30 – 40 years old, approximately 180 – 220 lbs with an average to medium build. The suspect is clean shaven with short black hair. He was wearing a light blue long-sleeved shirt, tan khaki pants and brown sneakers at the time of the incident. Officers canvassed the area with negative results. The investigation is ongoing.

The rest of this past week’s crime report highlights, including some that we’ve already reported, after the jump.

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by ARLnow.com September 20, 2017 at 12:00 pm 0

This week’s Arlington Pet of the Week is Sophie, a black Labrador mix.

Here is what she had to say about her life so far:

Hi everyone! My name is Sophie, and I’m a black lab mix. I was born in South Carolina, but my mom and dad adopted me from Lucky Dog Animal Rescue when I was about one year old.

I was underweight, stinky and sick with heart worm, but after a few months I felt much better. I have lots of doggy cousins, and my best friends are Petey and Louie. I don’t have a fur sibling yet, but I’m keeping my paws crossed that I’ll get one soon!

I have a ton of energy and lots of hobbies. Here are some of my favorite things to do: swim, run, jump, get tummy rubs, play with tennis balls, obsessively lick stuff, stalk squirrels, bark at strangers and watch Bravo with mom.

I also enjoy dirty socks, clean socks, pup-sicles, sleeping in the sunshine, and listening to my parents make up songs about me.

Because I had a hard life before I was adopted, some things still scare me. I hate loud noises, cardboard boxes, guitars, golf clubs, Roomba, thunderstorms, maintenance people, and men wearing hats. My mom and dad always comfort me when I’m scared though– that’s one of the reasons I love them.

All in all, I have a great life, and I’m looking forward to a lifetime of trips to the dog park, cuddles, and walks!

Want your pet to be considered for the Arlington Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least 3-4 horizontally-oriented photos of your pet. Please don’t send vertical photos, they don’t fit in our photo galleries!

Each week’s winner receives a sample of dog or cat treats from our sponsor, Becky’s Pet Care, along with $100 in Becky’s Bucks. Becky’s Pet Care is the winner of six consecutive Angie’s List Super Service Awards, the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters’ 2013 Business of the Year and a proud supporter of the Arlington County Pawsitively Prepared Campaign.

Becky’s Pet Care provides professional dog walking and pet sitting in Arlington and all of Northern Virginia, as well as PetPrep training courses for Pet Care, CPR and emergency preparedness.

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