91°Scattered Clouds

by ARLnow.com — January 14, 2016 at 11:00 am 0

Arlington County fire truck(Updated at 12:10 p.m.) Arlington County and Fort Myer firefighters and medics are on the scene of a carbon monoxide incident on Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall.

The incident is taking place at the Cody Child Development Center on the base. Firefighters were dispatched there shortly after 10 a.m.

According to scanner traffic, employees and children were evacuated to an auditorium due to a high level of carbon monoxide in the building. The source of the CO has been traced back to a malfunctioning boiler.

Firefighters are ventilating the building while a hazmat team continues to monitor conditions. Medics treated and monitored at least eight patients, who are suffering nausea and anxiety-like symptoms. No patients required transport to the hospital.

A crew of firefighters was dispatched to the center’s kitchen to retrieve infant formula for some of the children, according to scanner traffic.

Around noon, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall issued the following press release about the incident, asking parents to come pick up their children.

A “suspicious odor” reported this morning at the Cody Child Development Center on the Fort Myer portion of Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall has led to the relocation of the center’s children to another portion of the center as JBM-HH Fire and Rescue services investigate.

Emergency services responded after detection of a “suspicious odor” in the facility earlier this morning. At approximately 11:30 a.m., the emergency services

Parents of the children have been notified and are asked by the center’s management to pick up their children as soon as possible.

“Our primary concern is the safety of everyone involved,” said Col. Mike Henderson, JBM-HH commander. “We are doing everything possible to mitigate any potential danger to children, staff and others involved.”

Children are being screened and will be treated by medical services on scene.

Joint base officials said that there is a plan in place to quickly relocate children to another portion of the joint base if responders’ investigation determines that there is indeed a safety hazard present.

Parents seeking additional information about the situation can contact the Cody Child Development Center’s management at 703-696-3712.

Additional information will be released as available. Please check the JBM-HH Facebook page at www.facebook.com/jbmhh for additional details as they become available.

by ARLnow.com — January 5, 2016 at 9:00 am 0

Scene along Columbia Pike (Flickr pool photo by Dennis DImick)

Taxi Driver Fights Arlington Cemetery Tickets — A taxi driver is scheduled to appear in federal court later this month to appeal three misdemeanor traffic convictions. U.S. Park Police have been repeatedly ticketing Yahia Fayed for idling outside of Arlington National Cemetery, where he says there’s a steady stream of people looking for a cab. Federal officials say that’s not allowed. So far, no militiamen have threatened to protest federal government tyranny on Fayed’s behalf. [Washington Post]

Scary CO Incident at Gym Near Fairlington — Arlington County firefighters and medics were among those who responded to the XSport Fitness gym on King Street, across from Fairlington, on Saturday for a carbon monoxide incident. Witnesses said people all of a sudden started collapsing on their treadmills. Seven were hospitalized. A malfunctioning pool heater was found to be the cause. [Fox 5 DC]

Arlington Ready to Enforce Snow Removal Ordinance — Should snow ever fall this winter, Arlington County is ready to enforce its five-year-old snow removal ordinance. Last season, 25 citations were issued for snow removal violations. [InsideNova]

Lidl HQ Close to Opening — The new U.S. headquarters for German grocery giant Lidl is getting ready to open near Potomac Yard. The company also just purchased land near Richmond for one of its first stores in Virginia. [Virginia Business]

Flickr pool photo by Dennis Dimick

by ARLnow.com — January 28, 2014 at 8:15 am 0

This week’s frigid temperatures could be deadly, even inside your home.

The Arlington County Fire Department warns that carbon monoxide incidents typically increase during cold weather as home heating units kick into overdrive. The department issued the following press release, with carbon monoxide safety tips.

As the frequency of Carbon Monoxide (CO) incidents increases during colder winter months, the Arlington County Fire Department reminds all residents to install CO alarms and practice safe heating practices. In 2012, Arlington experienced 47 carbon monoxide incidents and 56 in 2013. These incidents occurred in all types of homes, including single family homes, townhouses, garden apartments and high-rise occupancies.

The silent killer

Carbon monoxide is known as the “silent killer” because it is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness or death.  At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. Eventually carbon monoxide poisoning will lead to unconsciousness home, elevated levels of CO can kill you before you are aware there is a problem. However, if CO alarms are installed properly, they will alert the occupants before symptoms even start. CO alarms are an inexpensive way to protect yourself and your family.

CO is produced when fuels, such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane, burn incompletely. While individual apartments may not have these types of appliances in their unit, CO can seep into their unit from another source in the building. Common causes of carbon monoxide in the home include gas furnaces, water heaters, gas stoves, fireplaces, wood stoves, space heaters, portable generators and automobiles idling in a closed or attached garage.

General carbon monoxide precautions:

  • Install carbon monoxide alarms in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For the best protection, interconnect all carbon monoxide alarms throughout the home. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for placement and mounting height.
  • If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds, immediately move to fresh air and call 9-1-1.
  • If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries. If the alarm still sounds after the batteries are replaced, call 9-1-1.
  • Do not leave the car engine running in the garage, fumes can quickly build-up and seep through door cracks into the home.
  • Do not use a gas stove or oven to heat your home.
  • Ensure all fuel-burning appliances are checked regularly by a trained and certified professional. This includes appliances such as furnaces, gas heaters, ovens, fireplaces etc.
  • During and after a snowstorm, make sure vents for the dryer, furnace, stove, and fireplace are clear of snow build-up.
  • A generator should be used in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.
  • Only use gas or charcoal grills outside.

More information on how to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, visit the fire department’s website.

by ARLnow.com — February 6, 2012 at 1:00 pm 2,525 16 Comments

(Updated at 1:55 p.m.) The Arlington County Fire Department on the scene of a carbon monoxide incident in the Courthouse area.

Firefighters initially responded to the U.S. Print and Copy store at 2044 Wilson Boulevard for a report of a person feeling light-headed and dizzy. Personnel started treating the victim and then detected high levels of carbon monoxide, prompting a larger fire department response.

A total of three patients have been evaluated by paramedics, according to ACFD spokesman Capt. Gregg Karl. It’s unclear whether any of the patients will require transport to the hospital.

Firefighters are investigating the possibility that the carbon monoxide is coming from a malfunctioning furnace in the basement of the store. Personnel also checked other businesses along the same retail strip and found elevated carbon monoxide levels in next-door Summers Restaurant, Karl said.

As of 1:45 p.m., Washington Gas crews was on the scene, the stores were being ventilated, and firefighters and police officers (who were helping with traffic control) were beginning to clear.

 

by ARLnow.com — May 18, 2010 at 12:03 pm 0

At least four people were sent to the hospital after elevated carbon monoxide levels were detected in the Arlington Court Suites Hotel at 1200 North Courthouse Road.

Firefighters believe the CO may have wafted into the hotel after a vehicle was left running for an extended period of time in a parking garage.

Several victims complained of headaches as a result of carbon monoxide exposure. One other person was evaluated on the scene and released.

Firefighters have brought in portable fans to ventilate the building.

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