Join Club

Demolition of the old Inner Ear Studios in Green Valley is expected to start this month, after some delays.

This project was delayed after the discovery of unforeseen structural conditions with the adjoining building,” Arlington Dept. of Environmental Services Public Engagement Specialist Alyson Jordan Tomaszewski told ARLnow.

“After modifying the construction plans, we are now expecting demolition to start later this month and conclude in spring 2024,” she continued, noting that the issues were discovered in May.

Arlington County acquired the nearly 70-year-old warehouse and building at 2700 S. Nelson and 2701 S. Oakland streets — once the epicenter of the D.C. punk scene — in late 2021.

Deeming the building structurally unsound, the county decided to demolish it and build a flexible open space for arts programming. It aims to create an arts and industry district in Green Valley and make the arts more accessible in south Arlington.

The county approved a contract for demolition work last December and, at the time, work was expected to take 180 days and wrap up this summer. The surprise structural conditions have delayed the timeline several months and depleted the contingency budget down to $15,700, per a county report.

This weekend, the Arlington County Board is set to approve a $100,000 contract increase to cover “unforeseen conditions that are likely to be revealed” during the remaining work, the report says.

“Previously authorized contingency has been expended to implement structural modifications that were required due to unknown structural connections with adjoining buildings,” the report says. “The structural modifications have been resolved and demolition of the building is proceeding.”

If approved, the new funds will bring the total contract with Demolition Services, Inc. to nearly $547,750. Even with the contract increase, the overall budget for this project remains unchanged at $1,136,633, the report says.

Meantime, this August, the county released the final design plans for the new, temporary art space. It will be nestled among the Arlington Food Assistance Center and the Arlington Cultural Affairs building — now home to an outpost of Arlington Independent Media — and across from Jennie Dean Park.

A project webpage projects the space will be installed and open in 2024.

The designs take inspiration from Inner Ear Studios and nearby Four Mile Run, according to a video.

A plywood drum riser salvaged from Inner Ear Studios will sit atop a small outdoor stage, which has as a backdrop the corner of a wall saved from the original building.

“This small performance area serves as a monument to the creativity of the hundreds of local and national bands that recorded on this site from 1990 to 2021,” the video says. “Through a public workshop the wall will be decorated with wheatpasted print media including historical and cultural contributions from local communities and reprinted album covers from records recorded here.”

Thin blue and teal lines will criss-cross the pavement, evoking “a flowing river,” while string lights will serve as “gateways into the space,” the video says.

Lawns on either side of the small, Inner Ear-inspired stage will have outdoor sculptures and a mobile stage with a screen for movie projections. Planted berms and concrete blocks will provide a seating while a pergola will double as a shade structure and outdoor art gallery.

Inner Ear Studios has since relocated to the basement of owner Don Zientara’s Arlington house.

0 Comments
Swiftie Soiree flier (via the Village at Shirlington)

Swifties in Arlington, get ready for a night dedicated to the pop icon Taylor Swift.

Swiftie Soirée: Celebrating Eras in Style” is scheduled for this Friday from 6-8:30 p.m. at The Village at Shirlington.

The event, aimed at both longtime fans and newcomers to Taylor Swift’s music, will be the same night as the debut of a movie of the star’s highly-anticipated concert film.

“You can choose to attend the movie screening before or after our event,” per a press release. “We’ll be here to keep the celebration going, whether you’re heading to the movie or not.”

The event will have themed cocktails and a DJ playing Swift’s discography. Attendees are encouraged to dress up in outfits inspired by their favorite Swift “era” and take photos inside era-specific photo sets.

Tickets for this 21-and-over event are priced at $31 and can be obtained via the ARLnow events page. Tickets to the movie must be purchased separately.

A full press release is below.

Swiftie Soirée: Celebrating Eras in Style! Calling all Swifties! Join us for a night of Eras-themed celebration. Enjoy cocktails, dancing, crafts, photo ops, and more!

WHAT: Calling all Swiftie fans! Get ready to experience a night filled with all things Taylor at our “Swiftie Soirée: Celebrating Eras in Style!” event, happening on the same night as the release of Taylor Swift’s highly anticipated movie.

Whether you’re a Swiftie from the Fearless era or a folklore enthusiast, this is the place to be to celebrate the iconic popstar and her incredible music journey, and you can keep the celebration going whether you’re heading to the movie or not.

WHEN: Friday, October 13, 2023

TIME: 6-8:30 p.m.

WHERE: The Village at Shirlington
Campbell Avenue
Arlington, Va. 22206

WHAT TO EXPECT:

Album Inspired Cocktails: Enjoy two specially crafted themed cocktails from our participating vendors that pay homage to the popstar’s chart-topping hits.

DJ and Dancing: Our talented DJs will keep the dance floor buzzing with your favorite Swiftie tracks all night long. Get ready to dance, sing, and feel the music as we celebrate her discography.

Friendship Bracelet Workshop: Channel your inner creativity as you craft friendship bracelets. You’ll receive two friendship bracelets to share with friends and fellow fans, and make one to cherish as a memory of this fantastic night.

Eras Tour Photo Moments: Step into this popstar’s world as we recreate iconic photo moments from her various tours and eras. Capture memories with your friends and fellow Swifties in these unforgettable photo setups.

Eras Concert Outfit Challenge: Embrace the spirit of the popstar’s ever-evolving style! Dress up as your favorite era, whether it’s the country charm of “Fearless” or the indie vibes of “folklore.” Participate in our Eras Concert Outfit Challenge for a chance to win exciting prizes.

Movie Night: Coinciding with our event, Taylor Swift’s latest movie will be released on the same night.

You can choose to attend the movie screening before or after our event. We’ll be here to keep the celebration going, whether you’re heading to the movie or not!

This event does not include your movie ticket to Taylor Swift | The Eras Tour. Tickets for the movie should be purchased separately from AMC Shirlington.

Don’t miss this opportunity to connect with fellow Swifties, dance the night away, and celebrate this iconic music. Tickets are limited, so grab yours now for a night you won’t forget!

TICKET INFORMATION: Get your tickets today and join us for a night that will leave you enchanted!

Note: This event is not affiliated with Taylor Swift or her management; it is a fan-inspired celebration of her music and career.

#SwiftieSoiree

0 Comments
Clarendon Day (file photo)

Several events are scheduled to take place across Arlington on Saturday, bringing both festivities and road closures.

The events celebrate everything from the neighborhood of Clarendon to Bavarian and Irish culture.

Clarendon Day

Kicking off at 11 a.m., Clarendon Day will offer live music, food, craft beer, Virginia wines, art and inflatable obstacle courses. The event, which is one of Arlington’s largest street festivals, ends at 6 p.m.

Metro riders can take the Orange Line to the Clarendon station, the entrance to which is in the middle of the multiblock festival area.

Stretches of Wilson Blvd and Clarendon Blvd will be closed from 3 a.m. to 10 p.m. to accommodate the event, according to Arlington County police.

The complete list of street closures for the event is below.

  • Wilson Blvd, from Washington Blvd to N. Highland Street
  • Clarendon Blvd, from Washington Blvd to N. Garfield Street
  • N. Highland Street, from 11th Street N. to Wilson Blvd
  • N. Herndon Street, from Wilson Blvd to the alleyway behind CVS
  • N. Hudson Street, from Wilson Blvd to the alleyway behind CVS

Samuel Beckett’s Celtic Festival

Samuel Beckett’s Irish Pub in Shirlington is hosting its annual Celtic Festival this Saturday from 12-7 p.m.

The event will highlight traditional Irish music and dance and feature a pop-up market, food and beverages.

Campbell Avenue, from S. Randolph Street to the parking garage entrance in front of Harris Teeter, will be closed from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

National Landing Oktoberfest

Additionally, the National Landing Business Improvement District is holding an Oktoberfest event from 1-5 p.m. this Saturday at the corner of 22nd Street S. and S. Fern Street, behind what is dubbed “Restaurant Row” in Crystal City.

The beer-centric, Bavarian-ish event includes live music from the Alte Kumpel Band and The Pilgrims of Deep Run. Food and drinks, including offerings from Crystal City Sports Pub, will be available for purchase.

Activities include a stein-holding competition, a best-dressed contest, lawn games and crafting stations for kids featuring hat-making and clove decor. Attendees can register online ahead of time.

Police will close 22nd Street S. between S. Eads Street and S. Fern Street from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.

0 Comments
Clarendon Ballroom entrance on a Saturday night (staff photo)

(Updated at 11:55 a.m.) The Clarendon Ballroom is set to hold a street festival this weekend.

Bidding farewell to summer, the nightlife venue at 3185 Wilson Blvd — also known as just The Ballroom — is hosting what it says is Arlington’s first electronic music-inspired street festival.

This Saturday, Sept. 23, from 2-10 p.m., the streets of Clarendon will host a festival complete with a “state-of-the-art” stage, lighting and sound system, according to the event listing.

The event, dubbed “Ballroom on the Block,” will take place along N. Irving Street between Wilson Blvd and 12th Street N. It promises to bring a “rooftop vibe” down to the streets, complete with a beer garden, lounge sections, yard games, carnival treats and local vendors, per the event webpage.

More, below, from the event listing.

What to expect:

  • Epic Outdoor Mainstage Production
  • Local electronic DJs all Day
  • Outdoor Beer Garden
  • Food Stands
  • Outdoor grill and BBQ
  • Multiple Bars
  • Kandi Making Station
  • Carnival treats
  • Games including cornhole, water pong, giant jenga, ring toss
  • Local Vendors
  • Outdoor Lounges
  • Giveaways

Following the festivities, the venue also plans to host an after-party inside from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Ticket prices start at $10 but increase as the event date approaches. Between now and Saturday, tickets are $35 apiece for general admission.

For an additional $20, attendees can opt for a “VIP Fastpass,” which grants them line-skipping privileges and access to both indoor and outdoor areas of Clarendon Ballroom throughout the day.

Police will be closing N. Irving Street between 8 a.m. and 2 a.m. to help accommodate the festival, according to ACPD. Would-be attendees might want to pack a poncho: rain is in the forecast.

0 Comments

(Updated at 08/29/23) Get ready for a symphony of local sounds and savory pies.

ACME Pie Company in Penrose is set to host its third annual music event, featuring musicians from across Northern Virginia, this Saturday from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. at 2803 Columbia Pike.

Admission is free, but Sol Schott — a former fine-dining pastry chef turned pie shop owner — says he’s asking for a $10 donation. This will be divided between the bands at the show’s end.

“It’s been a difficult time for musicians,” Schott told ARLnow, adding that several musicians performing at the event rely on music as their primary source of income.

“There’s a lot of different ways people can make money with music, and it just seems like over the last four years or so, since the pandemic, a lot of those options have kind of gone away,” he said. “I also want to do something nice for South Arlington.”

Of course, attendees will also be able to enjoy Schott’s assortment of pies, including quiche and pot pies, as well as seasonal fruit pies such as blackberry, peach and blueberry.

Schott said the show — held in the parking lot behind the pie shop — starts out “more blues and jazz,” then as the evening progresses, “it will become more rock and roll.”

The pie maker will also make an appearance on stage as the drummer for the act MF Grumbler.

Here is the lineup:

  • 2 p.m. — Rick Franklin and guests
  • 3 p.m. — Swingamajig
  • 4 p.m. — Coronal Josh & Paisley Tonk
  • 5 p.m. — Ex Motorcycle Couriers
  • 6 p.m. — Karl Straub Quartet
  • 7 p.m. — Delicate Whip
  • 8 p.m. — MF Grumbler
  • 9 p.m. — Jackie & the Tree Horns
The event poster for this Saturday’s music event at Acme Pie Company on Columbia Pike (via Acme Pie Co./Instagram)
0 Comments

The legendary Inner Ear Studio has reopened in the founder’s Arlington Heights basement.

Last week, the recording studio’s founder Don Zientara spoke at length to the Embracing Arlington Arts podcast about what’s been happening since the studio moved from its home of three decades on S. Oakland Street last year.

The biggest change is that the studio is now back in Zientara’s basement in Arlington Heights where Inner Ear started in 1979.

“It isn’t gone, it’s still thriving,” he told host Janet Kopenhaver. “I’m back in my basement and realizing I can’t fit everything in here.”

He was able to bring over some of his favorite microphones, but much of his old equipment had to be sold or given away. Zientara said that he gave it to people that he “thought could use it the best.”

Much of the art, band posters, prints, drawings, and ephemera that lined the walls at Inner Ear Studio are now at D.C.’s Lost Origins Gallery. It’s set to be on a display soon as part of an exhibit about the famed recording studio.

“They took a lot… they were cutting walls out,” Zientara said. “Some posters there that I thought ‘Come on, this is going to go down with the ship,’ but they were cutting and sometimes took pieces of drywall.”

Zientara told Kopenhaver that he harbors no ill will towards Arlington County for making the studio vacate the building on S. Oakland Street it had called home since 1990.

In 2021, Arlington County purchased the building for more than $3 million, with the intention of demolishing it to make way for an arts and industry district.

As Arlington Cultural Affairs director Michelle Isabelle-Stark told the Washington Post at the time, the county saw this as saving the property from being bought by a private developer. The plan for the new district has some Green Valley community members concerned, though.

“There was no sense in trying to argue with anyone,” Zientara said about the move. “It was fine. A lot of businesses don’t last 32 years. I’m good with [it].”

Inner Ear Studio is famed for being the recording studio where many of the region’s well-known punk bands recorded. That includes Fugazi, Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and, one of the biggest acts in rock, the Foo Fighters. Some called it “the Abbey Road of Arlington.”

Zientara said that the reason a lot of the indie punk bands came to his small Arlington studio was that they were often rejected from the more polished, bigger recording studios.

“I had equipment that was, let’s say, less than ideal. I had a space that was less than ideal,” he explained last week. “[The] bands were not welcomed at a lot of the studios, but I could record them.”

While the studio is now smaller than in its heyday, Zientara described the situation as going back to his roots.

While he could have fully retired or taught at one of the region’s universities — he said he had offers on the table — Zientara is currently in what he calls “semi-retirement.” That means he’s working when he wants and with who he wants.

In fact, when ARLnow reached him this morning for a brief conversation, he said that D.C. punk music icon Ian MacKaye was coming by the studio today to “mix some things.”

Read More

0 Comments

Arlington residents can look forward to music shows, amusement rides and bouncy castles as the Arlington County Fair is set to return next month.

The annual county fair is scheduled to be held between Wednesday, Aug. 17, and Sunday, Aug. 21, at the Thomas Jefferson Community Center, at 3501 2nd Street S. It is free to attend and open to the whole family.

Here is the fair schedule for the outdoor area:

  • Wednesday, Aug. 17: 5-10 p.m.
  • Thursday, Aug. 18: 5-10 p.m.
  • Friday, Aug. 19: 2-11 p.m.
  • Saturday, Aug. 20: 10 a.m.-11 p.m.
  • Sunday, Aug. 21: 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

Although canceled in 2020 due to the pandemic, the fair has been held for more than 40 years and attracted over 84,000 people from Northern Virginia and the D.C. Metropolitan area to attend in past years, according to the fair’s website.

The Night Market is a new event this year. It is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 18, between 5-10 p.m. It is only open to vendors selling personally made handicrafts and art pieces. Apart from crafts, other business and nonprofit organizations are expected to run indoor booths as well.

The fair is also planning to host local music groups and solo artists for weekend performances on the turf field. The performance schedule has not been released.

For children and families, the fair is set to hold a Kids Court with different games, including a pie eating contest. Additionally, there will be a variety of amusement rides will be provided by the Cole Shows Amusement Company. Each ride is expected to take three to six tickets, with each ticket selling for $1.25.

Other activities include competitive exhibits scheduled on Wednesday, Aug. 17, and Thursday, Aug. 18, where participants can showcase the products they made, in categories such as baked goods, needlework, handicrafts, and photography, according to the Competitive Exhibits Guide. The theme for this year’s exhibit is “What a Ride!” and an award ceremony for the winners is set on Saturday, Aug. 20.

This year’s fair is also expected to feature a beer garden organized with New District Brewery. That’s in addition to the usual fair fare, such as funnel cakes, deep fried Oreos, pizzas and other items.

The executive board for the fair previously discussed changing the venue to Long Bridge Park but ultimately decided against it after public feedback favored staying put the the TJ Community Center, which is centrally located in Arlington but a distance away from transit and the county’s denser population centers.

The upper field at the community center was closed for renovations for the first half of this year and reopened in June after being fitted with a synthetic turf, according to a county website.

0 Comments
SOJA at the 2022 Grammys (via @sojagram/Instagram)

A band that formed at Yorktown High School in Arlington is now a Grammy winner.

SOJA, also known as Soldiers of Jah Army, won the Grammy for Best Reggae Album for their 2021 release Beauty in the Silence, following two prior nominations in the same category. The awards aired last night on CBS.

The band has received international acclaim while maintaining its Arlington roots. SOJA performed on the Tonight Show in 2012; it also performed one of the last shows at Whitlow’s in Clarendon last summer.

Not everybody was happy with a reggae band from Arlington winning out over notable Jamaican nominees like Spice and Sean Paul.

“The win marks the first time an all-white Reggae band has won the award and the third time a non-Jamaican person or group has won in the Reggae category’s 37 year history. During the acceptance speech, SOJA paid tribute to Jamaica, the homeland of Reggae,” reported BET. “However, the announcement did not appear to sit well with music fans who took to their social media platforms to air out their frustration.”

Smh,” tweeted Jamaican dancehall artist Beenie Man, one of several who were not nominated but expressed disappointment at fellow Jamaicans not winning the Grammy.

SOJA, meanwhile, thanked fans via social media “for all your years of support” yesterday, prior to winning. After winning, frontman Jacob Hemphill expressed more gratitude.

“We wanna thank all our influences when we were growing up. Starting our reggae band was kind of our dream and the only thing we wanted to do. And then one day people started coming to the shows,” Hemphill said, as quoted by BET. “To the founding fathers of reggae music into the island of Jamaica, you inspired us all. Give thanks. One love.”

Photo via @sojagram/Instagram

0 Comments

Morning Notes

A runner along Long Bridge Park in Crystal City (staff photo by Jay Westcott)

Local GOP Supports NAACP’s Caucus Call — “We agree with the NAACP Arlington Branch when they exclaim ‘holding a partisan caucus outside the general election schedule leads to voter confusion and thus undermines voter engagement… and candidate recruitment,’ and we support the NAACP’s strong recommendation that the ‘ACDC cease its School Board caucus and endorsement process…'” [Arlington GOP]

New Mahjong Speakeasy in Pentagon City — “Scott Chung, the restaurateur behind Bun’d Up, was chatting with fellow chef Andrew Lo not long ago about how to best make use of the back room of his Taiwanese gua bao eatery in Pentagon City. Chung had a vision for a dive bar. Lo suggested a hub for mahjong… The end result is Sparrow Room, a speakeasy-style cocktail bar and dim sum restaurant at Westpost (formerly Pentagon Row) that opens Thursday, Jan. 27.” [Arlington Magazine]

ACFD Rolling Out Telehealth Pilot Program — “Hospitals and emergency crews are stretched thin across the region, which has Arlington County turning to telehealth to help. Paramedics will still respond to 911 calls, but the new pilot program will give patients with less serious emergencies the option of skipping the trip to the emergency room and seeing a doctor through a screen instead.” [Fox 5]

Arlington Church Gets Grand Organ — “St. George’s Episcopal Church is slated to formally present Northern Virginia with an extraordinary and lasting musical gift, a magnificent $1.2 million pipe organ designed by world-renowned organ builder Martin Pasi. The grand instrument, to be used in public concerts as well as for congregational services, is described by Pasi as ‘unique in the Northern Virginia area and comparable to the best in Europe.’ And potentially, it could be making music for the next three centuries.” [Sun Gazette]

Lunar New Year Celebration at Eden Center — “Through February 6th, Eden Center will celebrate the Lunar New Year (called Tet in Vietnamese) with traditional lion dances, music, special dishes, and other activities. Like Japan, Korea and Taiwan, Vietnam follows the traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar, which assigns each year to an animal in the Chinese Zodiac. This year, the year of the Tiger, promises passion and tumult, according to astrologers.” [Arlington Magazine]

It’s February — Today, Feb. 1, will be mostly sunny, with a high near 40. Sunrise at 7:13 a.m. and sunset at 5:30 p.m. Tomorrow will be partly sunny, with a high near 47. [Weather.gov]

0 Comments

Morning Notes

The departures lanes at Reagan National Airport (staff photo by Jay Westcott)

More Huge Covid Testing Lines — “This is the current situation at VA Highlands Park #COVID19 testing center! How do they expect people to preemptively get tested if that means standing in the bitter cold for hours?” [Twitter]

Libraries Run Out of At-Home Tests — “And Arlington libraries are out of tests, less than an hour after doors opened. No more tests until at least after Jan. 1.” [Twitter]

Arlington Band Gets Another Grammy Nod — “When the nominations for the Grammy Awards were announced on Tuesday, featured among the artistes up for the Best Reggae Album is the American band SOJA. The band was nominated for their seventh studio album Beauty in the Silence which was released on September 24 on ATO Records. It is not their first time to the party having been nominated on two previous occasions for their 2017 project Live in Virginia and Amid the Noise and Haste released in 2015.” [Jamaica Observer]

Teen Arrested for Armed Robbery — “The victim was walking in the area when he was approached by the two juvenile male suspects. Suspect One allegedly brandished a firearm and demanded the victim give them his belongings, while Suspect Two stole his backpack, cell phone, wallet and car keys. The two suspects then fled the scene on foot. A description of the suspects was broadcast and a short time later, officers located Suspect One in the area of S. George Mason Drive and Columbia Pike. During a search of his person incident to arrest, officers recovered the victim’s belongings, as well as a firearm.” [ACPD]

Our Holiday Wish — Despite being repeatedly cited as a source on Wikipedia, ARLnow does not currently have its own Wikipedia entry. The online encyclopedia frowns upon you creating a page for yourself, so our holiday wish is for someone to see fit to finally create one that briefly tells our story.

It’s Winter — It’s officially winter, after yesterday’s winter solstice. On the plus side, the days will only get longer and lighter from here on out. Today will start cloudy in the morning before becoming sunny in the afternoon. It will be breezy, with a high of 45. Sunrise at 7:23 a.m. and sunset at 4:50 p.m. Tomorrow will be clear throughout the day, with a high of 42 and a low of 27. [Capital Weather Gang, Darksky]

0 Comments
Encore Stage’s Enchanted Bookshop Christmas (Photo courtesy of Encore Stage/ Cindy Kane Photography)

As the region creeps back closer to normal, and with the holiday season now upon us, in-person performing arts are making a comeback.

Local theaters are once again welcoming back audiences for an assortment of concerts and productions.

If you’re interested in seeing a show and gaining some cultural enrichment while sitting among fellow humans, below are a few Arlington options to consider over the next few months.

The cast of Signature Theater’s Rent (Photo courtesy of Signature Theater/Christopher Mueller)

Signature Theater’s Rent 

When: November 2 to January 2, 2022

Where: 4200 Campbell Avenue in Shirlington

Safety Precautions: Proof of vaccinations or a negative test are required to attend a live, indoor performance at Signature Theater. Masks are also required at all times.

Details: In-person theater is back at Signature Theater with an all-new production of the iconic musical Rent.

“RENT is a musical about love, loss and community,” wrote director Matthew Gardiner in the press release. “After this past year where we’ve all felt isolated and disconnected, reopening Signature’s doors with this story about beautiful warriors and agents for change who found each other amidst unimaginable loss feels incredibly resonant.”

With a new artistic director at the helm, the Washington Post called Signature Theater’s production of Rent “gloriously harmonious.”

Encore Stage’s Enchanted Bookshop Christmas

When: November 19-21 & December 3-5

Where: Gunston ​​Arts Center, Theater 1 at 2700 S. Lang Street

Safety Precautions: Masks are required for everyone in the audience, including staff and students, except for children under the age of two. Concessions will only be available by pre-order and patrons must eat and drink outdoors.

Details: A sequel (with a holiday spin) to “Enchanted Bookshop,” which was performed at Encore Stage in 2019. Encore did two drive-by productions prior to moving back inside earlier this fall.

It’s four days before Christmas and a very special present has gone missing. Help come-to-life book characters solve the mystery and save the day. Enchanted Bookshop Christmas for all ages that’s 90 minutes including intermission.

Synetic Theater’s Cinderella (Photo courtesy of Synetic Theater/Johnny Shryock Photography)

Synetic Theater’s Cinderella 

When: November 27 to December 26

Where: 1800 S. Bell Street in Crystal City

Safety Precautions: All audience members over the age of 12 are required to provide proof of vaccination or a negative PCR test along with an ID. Children under 12 are not required to provide proof of vaccination or a negative. Masks are required at all times and concessions will not be sold during the performance.

Details: This is a modern re-telling of the classic magical tale of “a striking clock, a glass slipper, and a brave young woman who dares to pursue her wildest dreams.”

Synetic Theater kept active throughout the pandemic by streaming performances and doing outdoor theater earlier this fall.

Known for wordless physical theater, this performance is family-friendly as well as appealing to non-English speakers due to the fact that there’s little dialogue.

Avant Bard Theatre’s How I Learned What I Learned

When: December 1 to 19

Where: Gunston ​​Arts Center, Theater 2 at 2700 S. Lang Street

Safety Precautions: Proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test are mandatory for entry. Face coverings must be worn at all times while in the building.

Details: This autobiographical one-man show from one of America’s most acclaimed playwrights, August Wilson, stars William Newman, who some might know as the Chief Judge of Arlington’s Circuit Court. This isn’t Newman’s first starring role on the stage, either.

The performance deals with mature themes and is not suitable for all ages.

BallotNova’s The Nutcracker (Photo courtesy of BalletNova)

BallotNova’s The Nutcracker 

When: December 2 to December 5

Where: Kenmore Middle School at 200 S. Carlin Springs Road

Safety Precautions: Attendees 12 years old and over are required to show proof of vaccination or a negative PCR test within the past three days. All attendees are required to wear a mask, regardless of vaccination status. Fully vaccinated dancers over the age of 12 will not be wearing masks while performing.

Details: This BalletNova’s first live, in-person performance in nearly two years. This rendition has all-new choreography, sets, and costumes “that are sure to make this year’s production our most magical yet,” artistic director Matthew Powell writes ARLnow.

“There are also a few fun surprises in store, but we can’t give away all of our secrets,” he notes.

Tickets can be purchased at the door or on the website. The production is suitable for all ages.

National Chamber Ensemble’s Holiday Cheer (Photo via National Chamber Ensemble)

National Chamber Ensemble’s Holiday Cheer 

When: December 18

Where: Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington at 4444 Arlington Blvd

Safety Precautions: All patrons must be fully vaccinated, wear a mask at all times, and capacity will be less than 50% to allow patrons to spread out.

Details: A holiday concert featuring “star soprano” Sharon Christmann joining the ensemble and performing the favorites.

A streaming option will be available for those who don’t feel comfortable attending in person. This performance is family-friendly.

The Arlington Players’ A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Photo courtesy of The Arlington Players)

The Arlington Players’ A Midsummer’s Night Dream

When: January 15 to 30, 2022

Where: Thomas Jefferson Community Theatre at 125 S. Old Glebe Road

Safety Precautions: Proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative COVID test within the last 72 hours. Audience members must wear masks at all times as required by Arlington County.

Details: For the long-running community theater company, this William Shakespeare comedy is its first show back at Thomas Jefferson Community Theater. This past fall, the Arlington Players had an in-person, outdoor performance at Lubber Run Amphitheater.

A Midnight Summer’s Dream is family-friendly and open to all ages.

Know of any other upcoming performing arts shows in the area worth considering? Let us know in the comments.

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list