Arlington, VA

Everybody needs a place to work, so why not choose an office that also works for you?

While there are many coworking options in Arlington, Eastern Foundry is the only space tailored for government contractors. We’ve been helping businesses enter and grow in the federal market since 2014 and are always looking for more to join our community.

When you come to work at Eastern Foundry, networking happens naturally, and your next-door neighbor may just turn into your next teaming partner.

Our Rosslyn office is a perfect fit for any small or large business looking to connect with industry partners and have a flexible workspace. Not just an office, but an opportunity for growth, our event series brings high-level agency officials right to your door, and our unparalleled education provides our members with the resources they need to succeed at any stage of their business.

Whether you have two team members or forty, we are able to accommodate your needs. With 5 spacious conference rooms, phone nooks and ample coworking space, Eastern Foundry provides a variety of options for your company to thrive.

Our commuter friendly office is steps from the Metro, features a spacious bike storage facility, includes complimentary gym membership, and access to a rooftop lounge with one of the best views of D.C.

To learn how Eastern Foundry can take your contracting business to the next level, schedule a tour today or reach out directly to Cindy Lee.

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Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

There is no actual karate on the grounds of Coding Dojo, but the program does hope to help coders learn to chop through digital obstacles.

Coding Dojo is a boot camp for teaching coding with locations set up across the country. Bobby Bethea, Program Success Manager for Coding Dojo, said its new D.C. area location at Eastern Foundry coworking space (1100 Wilson Blvd) in Rosslyn is a relocation of an original location in Tysons.

“Arlington has always been on our radar,” Bethea said. “The idea to relocate the campus to Arlington was determined after a former student, now a staff member, developed an API which pulled the zip codes from existing applications submitted to Coding Dojo. Once pulled, the zip codes were organized to display a heat map.”

Bethea said the heat map showed that most of the applications were coming from Arlington, so when the lease expired, the school moved closer to the students.

Bethea also said the announcement of Amazon’s move to Arlington also played a role in the move; opening up a new market for Coding Dojo alumni.

“It did factor into our decision to move to Arlington because at the end of the day, our ability to help graduates find jobs is the most important aspect of our business,” Bethea said.

The Arlington location, like the others, teaches Python, MEAN, and C#/.NET. Bethea said the program is designed to be beginner-friendly and to fit with developers of various experience levels.

The 14-week program costs $13,495, though the company offers various payment plans, financing, and scholarships.

“Our dynamic curriculum was first developed in 2008 as an internal training program for small software engineering teams — the first in the industry,” Bethea said. “Ever since, we’ve constantly refined the curriculum and have trained thousands of students to either become developers or refine their skill sets. Today, we provide students with a veteran curriculum, that is proven to work as the most effective approach to training both experienced developers and students new to coding.”

Photo via Facebook/Coding Dojo

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Morning Notes

New Coworking Space Coming to Ballston — “Piedmont Office Realty Trust signed a 29K SF lease with WeWork at its Arlington Tower office building at 901 North Glebe Road in Ballston, the REIT said in its Q2 earnings release Wednesday evening. The coworking giant will take the entire fifth floor and plans to open before the end of the year, Piedmont Director Chris Poppell tells Bisnow.” [Bisnow]

Disaster Declaration May Be Coming Soon — “A disaster designation based on damage assessments in Arlington County would allow homeowners and businesses in Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax County to apply for low-interest federal loans beginning as soon as next week to help pay for repairs. Fairfax County Emergency Management Coordinator Seamus Mooney expects the designation to be approved within the next two weeks.” [WTOP]

Changes Proposed for Pentagon City Hotel — “The owner of the DoubleTree by Hilton in Crystal City is gearing up for a play to capitalize on the 627-room hotel’s proximity to Amazon.com Inc.’s second headquarters. Tom Baltimore, CEO of the hotel’s owner, Park Hotels & Resorts (NYSE: PK), told analysts on its second-quarter earnings call Thursday that the hotel is one of several the company is evaluating as possible redevelopment opportunities.” [Washington Business Journal]

Video: Dark Star Park Day — A timelapse video captured the moment on Thursday morning when the shadows lined up at Rosslyn’s Dark Star Park, as happens once a year on Aug. 1. [Twitter]

Arlington Boy Lives Dream in Boston — “There was a special visitor to the WBZ Weather Center on Thursday. Noah Coon from Arlington, Virginia is a big weather fan and stopped by the studio thanks to Dream On 3. Noah has cerebral palsy and was in Boston to visit the Red Sox. Because he’s also a fan of meteorology, he came to visit the WBZ weather team.” [WBZ]

Video: Yorktown vs. W-L — Just published online: “Long-lost footage of the famous Nov. 5, 1970, mud bowl football game between the Yorktown High School Patriots and the Washington-Lee Generals. Yorktown was favored with a 9-0 record but W-L won 12-0 and earned the Potomac District championship. [YouTube]

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Morning Notes

Incubator Leaving Crystal City — “Startup incubator 1776 plans to open its new D.C. location this year and will ultimately shut down its Crystal City location. 1776 spokesman Lucas McCanna said the company will relocate to ‘the general McPherson Square area,’ but declined to give a specific address.” [Washington Business Journal]

AAA: Worst Times for Independence Day Travel — “Holiday travelers hailing from the area will face absolute gridlock along key freeway segments starting [today], July 3. Topping the list of the worst corridors for those departing Wednesday, July 3, is Interstate 270 northbound.” [Press Release]

Arlington County Holiday Closures — All Arlington County government offices, courts, libraries and facilities will be closed Thursday for the Independence Day holiday, though trash and recycling will still be collected. Also, “metered parking is not enforced but street parking near the US Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima), Long Bridge Park, and the Air Force Memorial will be restricted. Motorists should look for temporary ‘No Parking’ signs.” [Arlington County]

Memorial Bridge Closed to Pedestrians — In addition to other July 4 road closures around Arlington, Memorial Bridge will be closed to both vehicles and pedestrians throughout the day Thursday. [Twitter, National Park Service]

ART Bus Holiday Schedule — “ART will operate holiday service on Thursday, July 4, 2019, in observance of Independence Day. ART 41, 42, 45, 51, 55 and 87 will operate on Sunday schedules. All other ART routes will not operate and the ART customer call center will be closed.” [Arlington Transit]

Superintendent Search May Be Drawn Out — “Arlington’s new School Board chair, who will be focused in coming months on the selection of a new superintendent, asked for patience in the community as the process plays out. ‘Finding the right leader and the best fit for our community will take time,’ Tannia Talento said July 1 as she rotated in as chair of the School Board for the coming year.” [InsideNova]

Flickr pool photo by Lisa Novak

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With the rise of coworking spaces appearing in Ballston and many other markets, companies have a lot to think about when selecting a coworking space.

As with any major decisions, there are important factors to think about including the atmosphere, office design and layout, and technical capabilities. While there are many trendy options in our market, there is only one that is designed with tech companies in mind — TechSpace Ballston.

TechSpace caters to the needs of growing tech companies in many ways including our robust technology platform, phone services, scalable private office suites and overall community atmosphere.

Creating an identity that resonates with technology companies is incredibly important to us, and members see it and experience it by just being in our halls — from the sleek, minimalist design of our space to the tech-oriented events, you are in a coworking space like no other.

Speaking of events, we host a variety of them! We highly encourage the Ballston community to join our bi-monthly Kublr meetups (next one on May 15 at 6 p.m.) where Arkadii Ocheretnoi, a Lead Platform Developer at Kublr who will be discussing “Stable, Predictable etcd Storage with Kubernetes.”

Please RSVP to attend. We look forward to showing you TechSpace Ballston!

Feel free to contact us at 703-650-7700 or reach out to our site manager, Julie Manning.  

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Two major coworking companies, which operate coworking spaces blocks apart in Ballston, are merging.

TechSpace has been acquired by the larger coworking provider Industrious, according to an email from TechSpace CEO Vic Memenas. ARLnow’s parent company is based in a TechSpace office and both companies are ARLnow advertisers.

“I am pleased to announce that, as of today, TechSpace is now part of Industrious, the largest premium flexible workspace provider in the U.S.,” Memenas wrote to tenants yesterday. “Over the next few months, the Industrious team will begin integrating TechSpace into their larger network.”

Memenas said the change “will have little impact” on TechSpace members. Thus far both the TechSpace and Industrious locations in Ballston are expected to continue operating despite their close proximity, we’re told; the Ballston TechSpace is almost completely full.

Industrious recently announced plans to open a new 25,000 square foot location in Courthouse, in addition to locations either open or planned in D.C., Bethesda, Tysons and Alexandria.

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Morning Notes

Big Trees Fall on Cars — In two separate incidents during Saturday’s windy weather, trees fell on cars near Pentagon City mall and near the corner of Lee Highway and N. Harrison Street. No serious injuries were reported. [Twitter, Twitter]

Coworking Space Coming to Courthouse — Courthouse is getting its first coworking space. Industrious, which recently opened a new coworking space in Ballston, is planning on opening a 25,000 square foot space at a recently-built office building at 2311 Wilson Blvd. [Bisnow]

New Arlington Election Director — “Electoral Board members announced April 24 they had selected Gretchen Reinemeyer, currently deputy to Director of Elections Linda Lindberg, to succeed Lindberg starting July 1. Lindberg had announced earlier in the year she planned on retiring from the post she had held since 2003.” [InsideNova]

Flickr pool photo by Kevin Wolf

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Since people have been working in offices, there have been trailblazers searching for different ways to structure the workplace.

Well, maybe that’s a bit of an overstatement, but it’s undoubtedly true that innovators are always looking for different ways to engage with their environments. Naturally, that extends to the work environment. Enter coworking, stage right!

In a nutshell, coworking is the practice of shared workspaces. Multiple unrelated companies work in the same building, often utilizing the operator’s administrative and amenity functions. In today’s modern and ever-changing office world, the fastest growing alternative to a traditional office space is a coworking space.

So, where do coworking spaces fit into the tradition of office spaces? The way people work and want to work has changed over the years with the increased capabilities of technology as well as the way people want to work. In order to attract top talent and younger demographics, many companies are ditching traditional spaces in favor of the more flexible coworking model.

The coworking industry has become a global phenomenon. Around 2008-2010, more operators joined the market, but in recent years the industry has just exploded. According to Emergent Research, over 1000 new coworking spaces opened in the second half of 2018 — almost half of which are located in the U.S.

TechSpace, one of the first operators in the coworking space industry, was established in 1997 and opened in the Ballston area in June 2018.

Typically, new or growing companies don’t have the funds (or the desire) to start in traditional spaces, but they also don’t know where their company will be in one year, let alone five. Two to five-year terms are standard minimums for traditional offices.

Most start-ups don’t want to tie up their capital with office leases — they like the flexibility of shorter terms provided by coworking spaces, as they can easily accommodate growth and change. However, large enterprise companies are now housing divisions of their companies at coworking spaces.

Coworking isn’t just for large companies or start-ups, though. What other uses can coworking spaces provide? Many coworking spaces, including TechSpace, provide on-demand conference rooms for members and non-members. For those who are working at home but need to meet clients in a professional environment, coworking spaces are ideal.

At TechSpace, you can book by the hour for a variety of size meeting spaces. TechSpace also offers virtual services, such as mailing addresses and business phone numbers, and call answering by a professional receptionist.

Many people ask what kinds of companies are best served by coworking spaces? The answer is many industries are actually well-suited to work in coworking spaces. Since opening in June 2018 at our newest Ballston location at 4075 Wilson Boulevard, we’ve experienced a rapid influx of businesses that have ties to the federal government, but also see a lot of growing tech companies. It’s interesting to note that despite the different sectors in which they operate, all businesses have become reliant on a superior technology infrastructure like the one TechSpace provides.

Our Ballston location has experienced rapid growth and has quickly leased up in less than one year. “This is a very obvious indicator that businesses in this market were starved for flexible, short-term office space,” said Brendan McGee, VP at TechSpace. “In addition to our rapid growth, it has been wonderful to see how warmly TechSpace has been embraced by local businesses in the Ballston community.

In our first year alone we’ve established great relationships with Taste of Arlington and ARLnow. It was also a great omen for us when on our Grand Opening night, the Washington Capitals won the Stanley Cup!” (We’re neighbors — their practice facility is just down the street)

So — is coworking the right path for your start-up or company? Learn more about why TechSpace’s coworking offices can be the right fit for your business!

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This column is written by Alex Taylor and sponsored by Arlington Economic Development‘s Business Investment Group.

Over the last decade, coworking spaces and related concepts have taken the commercial real estate sector by storm.

What used to be a niche industry focusing primarily on executive suites and conference facilities quickly became accessible to everyone from tech entrepreneurs and home-based businesses to major corporations looking for short-term, flexible space to service a multitude of different business opportunities.

Each space offers unique amenities tailored to a certain clientele, and while many in the commercial real estate industry remain skeptical of market saturation, others have come to believe coworking is here to stay as an important asset to the business community.

Surprisingly, the Washington, D.C. region has been one of the slowest markets to adopt coworking. In the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area only 0.5% of commercial office space is leased by coworking firms, compared to 3.5% in Austin, 3.0% in Seattle and 2.5% in New York City (New Knight Frank). Part of the reason for this is the nature of the entities doing business.

The federal government and its related contractors, lobbyists and law firms still cherish large swaths of private office space for varying reasons, often regarding security. Although the D.C. region has had a slow start in gaining traction for this alternative work environment, demand for coworking space could quickly pick up with the arrival of Amazon and the continued diversification of the economy toward more technical and innovative industries.

Back in 2015, Arlington Economic Development aided in recruiting 1776 and Eastern Foundry, two early entrants into the coworking space, in an effort to foster the growth of early-stage and fast-growing startups in Arlington.

The idea was to create an environment that provided the resources and office stock to meet the budgetary and business needs of the companies that were to be the future of our economy. Arlington’s commercial office market now features 21 coworking spaces, not including offerings like flexible spaces and speculative suites that developers and building managers are introducing to the flexible work environment.

As individuals and companies look to utilize space differently, coworking facilities are offering a convenient alternative to those who find themselves between “starting out of the garage” and signing a long-term lease. The ability to showcase a wide variety of real estate options allows Arlington to recruit the rapidly growing companies which will eventually require larger, long-term spaces and feed Arlington’s tax base.

As Arlington recruits nationally and internationally, coworking stock continues to be an important selling point to companies looking to make soft entries into our business ecosystem. It allows companies to ‘test the market’ while giving themselves time to find a permanent space should they be successful.

As the definition of coworking continues to grow and adapt, the void these spaces fill in the office market continues to be an invaluable asset as we build a more diverse, forward-thinking economy.

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Industrious, the largest premium coworking and flexible workspace provider in the U.S., will officially open its Ballston location on January 7, growing its presence in the D.C. Metro area.

Industrious is known for its beautiful and professional workspaces which are customized for entrepreneurs and mature startups through Fortune 500 companies. Its flexible workspaces are designed for optimal productivity and happiness — with everything from natural light and greenery to a mix of spaces that cater to all types of work and personalities.

The new office will be located in the heart of Ballston — on the third floor of 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Ballston Exchange’s 4201 tower. Within the space, members will find single desks, large conference rooms, luxurious common areas meant for building a strong community, a private nursing room and a kitchen filled with locally sourced coffee and snacks. The property also offers a direct connection to the Ballston Metro Station for seamless commutes and is located right across from Ballston Quarter, a new place for folks to gather, dine and shop.

Industrious offers workspace consultations and virtual tours for those interested in learning more about the different workspace solutions Industrious offers. Industrious will also host a Select Preview week from January 7-11, where members of the community can test out the space and join us for a week of networking, office tours and events to introduce and celebrate the new space. And if you refer a friend, Industrious will say thanks with up to $2,000 and also give new members a discount credit of equal value.

Check out the Industrious website for more information on the company that brings you a great day at work, everyday.

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Morning Notes

More Details on WeWork in Rosslyn — “WeWork has made it official: The coworking space provider is expanding, in a big way, into Rosslyn. Its newest location, expected to open in the second quarter of 2019, will include more than 1,400 desks across four floors of JBG Smith Properties’ CEB Tower, 1201 Wilson Blvd.” [Washington Business Journal]

Wreaths Laid Despite Rain — “Despite the rain, tens of thousands of volunteers came out on Saturday to lay wreaths on the graves at Arlington National Cemetery… President Trump made an appearance, speaking to soldiers while at the cemetery.” [WJLA, Fox News]

Explainer: State Roads in Arlington — “Though it’s not obvious, the roads you use every day are owned by an overlapping patchwork of governments, regulatory bodies, and private interests. This isn’t a story of tyrannical state governments imposing their will upon localities, but of intergovernmental coordination that sometimes works and sometimes doesn’t.” [Greater Greater Washington]

New ART Route Starts Today — “ART 72 connects North Arlington to Ballston and Shirlington. The new route, along with Metrobus 22A/C, brings more frequent weekday service between Ballston and Shirlington. Service operates every 20 minutes during rush hours and every 30 minutes the rest of the day.” [Arlington Transit]

Flickr pool photo by Tom Mockler

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