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by Jackie Friedman — July 14, 2016 at 3:45 pm 0

A store in Courthouse hosted some special four-legged guests Wednesday afternoon.

Members of the Arlington County Police Department K9 unit — both dogs and handlers — stopped by Olive Oil Boom (2016 Wilson Blvd) to accept a donation from the store. The shop, which specializes in olive oils and vinegars, raised money to purchase two K9 medical kits.

“I found out from one of the officers that they don’t have medical kits for their dogs if they go on scene or have any kind of medical issues, said Olive Oil Boom owner Judith Westfall. “Because of that, we decided to just start collecting donations for the K9 medical kits.”

The equipment in the medical kits are “meant [to be used] in case of a traumatic injury or heat stroke,” said ACPD Sgt. Bryan Morrison.

One medical kit will be used on site for training and one will be taken out into the field. The kits will allow officers to treat the dogs quickly and get them to an emergency vet.

“There is so much stuff in there and it’s a great benefit to our unit because they are a bit expensive and we are not afforded the opportunity to buy these. For somebody to donate them to us, it’s really great,” said Morrison.

by ARLnow.com — June 30, 2016 at 2:00 pm 0

Healthy Paws

Editor’s Note: Healthy Paws is a column sponsored and written by the owners of Clarendon Animal Care, a full-service, general practice veterinary clinic. The clinic is located 3000 10th Street N., Suite B. and can be reached at 703-997-9776.

As we head into the D.C. area’s hot and humid summer we often start to diagnose ear infections more frequently. To understand a little bit about these, looking at the anatomy of the ear of the dog and cat can be very helpful:

We break the ear down to three basic regions:

  • External ear (horizontal/vertical ear canals)
  • Middle ear (within the tympanic bulla)
  • Inner ear (where the hearing organs are located)

Ear infections can thus be broken down into external ear, middle ear (more like what a human gets when they get an ear infection), and rarely inner ear infections. The incriminating bugs for these infections can range from yeast, bacteria or mites… and they are all treated differently.  This is why your veterinarian will typically take a swab from the ear and examine it under the microscope — they are trying to identify what organism(s) and in what numbers are present.  In some cases of bacterial otitis, a culture and sensitivity is needed to find out what specific type of bacteria is present and to help guide antibiotic selection.

The real kicker with ear infections is that there is almost always an underlying cause — meaning the organisms we find in those ears are rarely the primary problem (the exception would be mites). To keep the infections from coming back and to facilitate clearing of the infection, the underlying problem should be looked for and addressed (or at least a management strategy put in place).

Predisposing factors for ear infections include:

  • Allergies (environmental, fleas or food)
  • Anatomy (certain breeds have anatomical characteristics that cause complete occlusion of the canal when even mild inflammation is present)
  • High humidity/heat, swimming, retained water in the ear canal
  • Trauma to the ear canal (e.g.: overly aggressive cleaning or inappropriate hair plucking)
  • Polyps
  • Tumors
  • Foreign objects
  • Medical conditions (diseases that compromise or alter immune-system function)

Otits Externa (inflammation/infection of the external ear canal) is the most common presentation of an ear infection in both dogs and cats. These can crop up as a new (acute) infection, a recurrent infection or a chronic (never fully cleared) infection.  

Management of Otits Externa involves treating the infectious component as well as addressing the underlying factors as well. Ear cleaning is often a mainstay of managing both the infectious component as well as helping managing some underlying factors (such as allergies and anatomical predispositions or to dry the canal following a swim). Because we find that a lot of folks were never taught how to correctly clean their pet’s ears – we’ve put together a video!

When ear infections are appropriately identified and addressed, we can often prevent or minimize recurrences – though for some pets this means a chronic/maintenance strategy is put in place. In cases where an pet has had severe chronic inflammation & infection of the external ear canal, scarring/fibrosis and mineralization of the ear canal may occur – making medical management far more difficult (and sometimes impossible). In many of these cases surgical removal of the external ear canal is indicated to provide lasting relief to the patient – this is called a total ear canal ablation or TECA.

Otits Media (inflammation/infection of the middle ear) often goes hand in hand with chronic bacterial Otitis Externa and the ear drum in these cases if often ruptured or severely thickened/abnormal. In some cases, we need to manage pain/infection/inflammation before we can even see the eardrum – and in these cases follow up/rechecks are very important so that we can really evaluate what is going on down in that canal.

In addition to causing recurrent symptoms of the external ear canal, these middle ear infections can actually cause neurologic symptoms (generally problems with balance), or pain opening the mouth. Otitis media often requires systemic medications, but in many cases anesthetic procedures to thoroughly evaluate, obtain biopsies and/or cultures and clean out the middle ear may be needed to get them to clear and heal. In some cases, aggressive surgical procedures to open the tympanic bulla (bulla osteotomy +/- TECA) may be indicated.

So what are the takeaways from this?

  1. It’s important to determine if your pet’s ear infection is caused by yeast, bacteria or mites so that component can be treated correctly.
  2. It’s really important to identify predisposing or underlying factors so that they can be addressed or chronically managed.
  3. It’s important to look at your pet’s ear drum to assess its health. If the middle ear gets involved topical medications alone rarely work (and sometimes we need to initiate treatment to even get a look at that ear drum).
  4. Work with your veterinarian to come up with a chronic management plan to help prevent/reduce recurrences, and if you have any questions about the plan — ask your veterinarian!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — June 20, 2016 at 2:35 pm 0

Local Woof logo

The Local Woof is a column that’s sponsored and written by the staff of Woofs! Dog Training Center. Woofs! has full-service dog training, boarding, and daycare facilities, near Shirlington and Ballston.

As school comes to a close for the year it’s time for summer vacations. Where to go? What to do? And who is going to take care of the dog?

If you can’t take your dog with you, the next best option is to have a family member or friend stay at your house. A familiar environment will help your pup cope with the stress of you being away. But sometimes that isn’t possible and you need to find a boarding facility.

The best boarding option is a facility that your dog attends regularly. Facilities that offer daycare and boarding often work well. The daycare option allows your dog to become familiar with the staff and the other dogs that attend regularly. For them it’s like a home away from home. Dogs who attend daycare regularly at WOOFS! are happy and healthy during boarding as well.

If your dog is stressed in the presence of other dogs they might do better in a traditional boarding environment where they do not interact with other dogs all day. Every dog is different, and luckily there are many options available in the area. In-home petsitting is a great option for dogs who don’t board well.

But for many dogs, boarding is stressful no matter what you do. Some dogs become incredibly anxious or depressed. Prolonged stress often leads to associated illnesses including gastrointestinal problems, weight loss and upper respiratory infections. Be sure to talk to your boarding provider and find out how your dog copes while you are away. If your dog does experience excessive amount of distress it might be time to find an alternative form of care.

So how can you help your stressed out dog survive a week away from home? First, be sure to book your petsitter as far ahead as possible. This gives you time to set up meetings and test runs with the caregiver so that your dog can become comfortable with them and the environment. Or, take the time to get your dog used to staying at a particular facility. Obviously, this is going to require paying for services that you don’t necessarily need, but it will more than pay for itself when your dog has an easier time while you away. It might even avoid the cost of a post vacation vet visit.

If all of this preparation is still not enough, talk to your vet. Just like in people, there are anti-anxiety medications that might help.

If you are getting a new puppy this summer, start getting them used to being away from you right away. Send your puppy to a friends for an occasional weekend even if you don’t need to travel. This is an important part of their socialization experiences and should happen two or three times before your pup is 6 months old. This will certainly help get them used to being away from you and make your future vacations away less stressful for everyone.

Happy Summer!

by Jackie Friedman — June 8, 2016 at 1:30 pm 0

dogs

The second annual Bark in the Park event will be taking place this Sunday, June 12, after being rescheduled due to anticipated storms last weekend.

The free event will be taking place at the James Hunter Dog Park, also known as the Clarendon dog park, from 3-6 p.m.

The event will feature live music by Americana group Caroline Ferrante and the Whole Magilla, bites from the Smoking Kow BBQ food truck, and plenty of activities and goodies for human children and four-legged “kids” alike. Dog exhibitors will also be on hand to answer any pet related questions.

The Clarendon Alliance and Clarendon Animal Care (an ARLnow columnist) are sponsoring the event.

There is still time to enter the event’s first annual “Cutest Pooch Contest.” Dog owners can upload a photo of their pup, while any animal lover can vote for their favorites. The winning entry will receive pet- and owner-appropriate prizes.

by ARLnow.com — June 8, 2016 at 11:05 am 0

This week’s Arlington Pet of the Week is Fauna, who’s training to be a service dog.

Fauna frequents the Village at Shirlington, Pacers 5K races and enjoys the occasional trip to the beach. Here’s more about her:

Please meet Fauna, a Guiding Eyes For The Blind “puppy with a purpose.” Last April, volunteer puppy raisers John and Kayla were matched with this petite 10 week old yellow lab puppy who couldn’t be cuter if she tried. Over the past year, Fauna has been taught basic obedience and house manners, and socialized in a variety of environments. Service dogs in training must learn to work around different people, places and distractions. She accompanies her raisers in stores, restaurants, offices, and even commutes on the Metro. Fauna is often seen training around Shirlington while working on her dog distractions. She especially enjoys her weekly training class where she learns new skills alongside the other puppies in our region.

But it hasn’t been all work and no play for Fauna. She loves to jog, hike, swim, fetch, tug, chew and cuddle with her raisers. She’s currently plowing through a bucket list of local outings, including a Nats game, a beach weekend in Ocean City, a Pacers 5K race, a Wolf Trap concert, the National Zoo, and much more. In between her daily training and play sessions, Fauna has helped to foster several rescue cats for Homeward Trails Animal Rescue. She would love to find a forever home for her boyfriend Sylvester (https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34854789).

Fauna is now 16 months old and getting ready for her big test in July that will determine which working career she is best suited for. She could be selected for formal guide dog training, the breeding colony, or an alternative career such as a detection or autism companion dog. But if she decides that she just misses her family too much, Fauna will be adopted by her raisers and serve as a surrogate mom for their new Guiding Eyes puppy in August.

Founded in 1954 and headquartered in Yorktown Heights, NY, Guiding Eyes for the Blind (www.guidingeyes.org) is an internationally accredited nonprofit guide dog school that has provided thousands of blind and visually impaired people with specially bred and trained dogs at no cost that grant them dignity, freedom and greater independence.

Want your pet to be considered for the Arlington Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least 3-4 horizontally-oriented photos of your pet. Please don’t send vertical photos, they don’t fit in our photo galleries!

Each week’s winner receives a sample of dog or cat treats from our sponsor, Becky’s Pet Care, along with $100 in Becky’s Bucks. Becky’s Pet Care is the winner six consecutive Angie’s List Super Service Awards, the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters’ 2013 Business of the Year and a proud supporter of the Arlington County Pawsitively Prepared Campaign.

Becky’s Pet Care provides professional dog walking and pet sitting in Arlington and all of Northern Virginia, as well as PetPrep training courses for Pet Care, CPR and emergency preparedness.

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — June 2, 2016 at 3:00 pm 0

Healthy Paws

Editor’s Note: Healthy Paws is a column sponsored and written by the owners of Clarendon Animal Care, a full-service, general practice veterinary clinic. The clinic is located 3000 10th Street N., Suite B. and can be reached at 703-997-9776.

(Updated at 5 p.m.) Here are some fun pet trivia questions for a lovely Thursday afternoon….

What were the most common male and female dog names in 2015?  

  • Tucker and Bailey

How do cats land on their feet when they fall?

  • The vestibular, or balance, system of cats tells them which was is up/down and helps them right themselves as they fall.  They also have a very flexible spine, which can help to absorb shock.  

What’s the most common reason for dogs to visit the veterinarian?

  • Ear infections/allergies

What’s the most common reason for cats to visit the veterinarian?

How many teeth do adult dogs have?

  • 42 (28 as puppies)

How many teeth do adult cats have?

  • 30 (26 as kittens)

What sex are all calico cats?

  • Female

According to the AKC, what are the 10 most popular dog breeds in the US?

  • Labrador Retriever, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Bulldogs, Beagles, Yorkshire Terriers, Poodles, Boxers, French Bulldogs, Rottweilers (in descending order)

Why don’t cats and dogs sweat?

  • Cats and dogs can actually sweat, but only through non-haired areas of their body – mainly the paws.  Dogs cool primarily via panting, and while cats typically prefer to not exert themselves to that point, though they can pant if the temperature is high enough.  

Which dog breed yodels instead of barks?

  • Basenji

What is the oldest dog breed?

  • Afghan Hound (followed by Tibetan Terrier, Basenjis, and Shih Tzus)

What is the tallest breed of dog?

  • Irish Wolfhound

What is the smallest breed of dog?  

  • Though up for debate, the consistently smallest AKC-recognized breed is the Chihuahua

What is the heaviest dog breed?

  • Mastiff or Saint Bernard

What is the oldest cat on record? and currently alive?

  • Creme Puff – 38 years and 3 days (August 3, 1967 – August 6, 2005)
  • Corduroy – almost 27 years old (August 1, 1989 to present)!

How many whiskers does a cat have?

  • 24 (approximately) – 12 per side

Random Facts:

  • The domestic cat is the only feline species able to hold its tail vertically while walking.
  • Cats can purr at the same frequency as an idling diesel engine, which is 26 cycles per second.  
  • The purr of a cat is also at a frequency that can promote tissue healing!
  • Bloodhounds, known for their amazing sense of smell, have approximately 230 million olfactory cells within their nasal passages, 40 times the number that humans have.

Please join us on Sunday, June 12 from 3-6 p.m. at the James Hunter Dog Park (a.k.a. Clarendon Dog Park) as we kick-off our “Friends of the Dog Park” sponsorship with Clarendon Alliance.  Caroline Ferrante and the Whole Magilla will be providing the music; Smoking Kow BBQ will be providing the food.  There will be exhibitors on-hand to answer your pet-related questions. Plus plenty of room for your pooch to play.

Do you have the cutest dog? Enter the Clarendon Dogs Photo Contest and vote for your favorites!

by ARLnow.com Sponsor — March 14, 2016 at 3:50 pm 0

Local Woof logo

The Local Woof is a column that’s sponsored and written by the staff of Woofs! Dog Training Center. Woofs! has full-service dog training, boarding, and daycare facilities, near Shirlington and Ballston.

A few weeks ago, Clarendon Animal Care wrote a great article with tips for a great vet visit. You can read it here.

Having been to the vet several times in the past weeks, their article got me thinking about the training and behavioral aspects of a successful vet visit. There are lots of things you can do to teach your dog that GOOD things happen at the vets office.

First, like the Healthy Paws article said, be on time. Going to the vet is stressful for most dogs. If you are stressed because you are running late, two things happen. First, your dog will feed off of your stress and it will make them feel worse. Second, if you are rushing, you will not be able to keep your focus on your dog. The best thing you can do is to be calm and reassuring. The calmer and more attentive you are, the better your dog will feel.

Bring GREAT treats. Sitting in the lobby is a great opportunity to reinforce good manners such as voluntary attention, sit, down and touch. If your dog knows tricks, start showing off. Not only will you get some great practice in, it will give your dog something to do and be rewarded for. You always want your dog looking at you. Staring at, or being stared at, by other pets increases stress and arousal and can result in altercations or an unmanageable dog. Keep your dog busy and focused on you.

NEVER allow your dog to wander into another animal’s space. Most waiting areas are very small so this is going to require you to keep a very short leash. Be prepared for this. Your dog should always be right at your side.

Remember, not all dogs are friendly with other dogs. And dogs might be sick or injured, making them feel less social than they normally would be. With smaller animals, the last thing a crated cat needs is a large predator coming up to their crate when they can’t get away. Remember, it DOES NOT MATTER how friendly your dog is. This is about respecting the personal space of the other animals. Always always ask before you allow your dog to meet other animals in the lobby.

You can absolutely train your dog to be an active and willing participant in their health care. If zoo keepers can train a giraffe to participate in blood draws and x-rays, we can certainly teach our dogs to voluntarily stand still when the vet listens to their heart, checks their ears and takes blood. Talk to you trainer about how to teach your dog to choose to participate. Dogs that participate do not need to be restrained or sedated as often.

Regular vet visits are an important part of your dogs health care and the more you do to make them comfortable for your dog, the easier it will be to take good care of them. Let your trainer help make vet visits as positive as possible for you and your dog.

by ARLnow.com — November 20, 2015 at 1:45 pm 0

Rosslyn Heights and Rosslyn Vue dog run (photo courtesy Jace Bauer)

(Updated at 3:50 p.m.) Arlington County officials have reportedly shut down a popular fenced-in “dog run” outside of a Rosslyn apartment community.

In a memo to residents of the Rosslyn Heights and Rosslyn Vue apartments on N. Quinn Street, building managers say that they’ve been ordered to remove the fence around the dog play area.

The decision, managers say in the memo, came from new Arlington Acting Zoning Administrator Arlova Vonhm, who decreed that a permit for building the fence around the nearly two-year-old dog run should never have been approved by the county.

Jace Bauer, a local resident, said that the dog run is “convenient and much enjoyed.” Via email, Bauer said the loss of the area is a blow for residents and for dogs.

“I recently moved to Arlington and have found this small, fenced in area to be a great spot in our community,” Bauer said. “I have met so many wonderful people in my first few months here while taking my one year old border collie mix out for a game of fetch. The nearest dog park (Clarendon) is a 30 minute walk, which is not practical for a quick morning or evening outing.”

The memo from building management, which suggests legal action may follow, is below.

Dear Residents of Rosslyn Heights and Rosslyn Vue,

A few months ago Arlington County received a complaint from our neighbors regarding the dog walk area by the leasing office. We have been attempting to work with Arlington County Zoning officials to comply with their requirements and appease our neighbors. Although this area has existed for almost two years, the Zoning Administrator, Ms. Arlova Vonhm, has decreed that the approved permit should not have been approved. Her decision is that the fence violates Arlington County Zoning ordinance and must be removed or we will be subject to fines and legal action for noncompliance. Ms. Vonhm has also been presented with multiple plans to relocate the dog walk to other areas of our property, all of which have been denied.

As such, tomorrow, November 20th, we will be removing the fence to comply with their order. Rosslyn Heights and Rosslyn Vue have always been pet loving communities and it gives us great displeasure to have to do this. Please take some comfort that we do not consider this matter closed. We will be obtaining legal counsel to bring this issue to the attention of the Arlington County Board (http://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/county-board-members) and County Manager, Mark Schwartz.

The next scheduled Arlington County Board Meeting is scheduled for Saturday, January 24th at 8:30am at 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Room 307.

Thank you for choosing Rosslyn Heights and Rosslyn Vue as your home and for your patience and understanding as we work through this situation.

Sincerely,

Rosslyn Heights Team

In an email Vonhm, the Acting Zoning Administrator, confirmed to ARLnow.com that today was the deadline for the apartment’s property manager to remove the fence, after it was determined that the county had mistakenly issued a permit for its construction contrary to the property’s approved site plan.

The site plan calls for only landscaping in the area where the dog run now is, Vonhm determined, after receiving complaints from neighbors. She noted that the property manager has the option of applying for a site plan amendment.

“The County’s position is that the fence changes the nature of how the space is used, and creates the problem of dogs running loose and creating excessive noise,” said Vonhm. “The option of applying for a site plan amendment is still open to the property manager, even after the fence is removed. The County has worked in good faith with the property manager to come up with a viable solution that addresses the neighbors’ concerns about noise from the dogs.”

Photo courtesy Jace Bauer

by Heather Mongilio — October 8, 2015 at 4:30 pm 0

Dog in costume (Courtesy of Doorways for Women and Families)Halloween is coming a week early at the Market Common Clarendon (2700 Clarendon Blvd), with the return of Falloween and Howl-O-Ween on Saturday, Oct. 24.

Howl-O-Ween, the annual trick-or-treating dog walking event, kicks off the morning at 9:30 a.m.

Dogs and their owners will make their way around the Market Common Clarendon loop, while stopping at local businesses to trick-or-treat. Each year, owners compete to have the best costume for their furry friends.

The event benefits local nonprofits Homeward Trails Animal Rescue and Doorways for Women and Families.

Kelly Spafford, a spokeswoman for Doorways, recommends owners use “originality, creativity and humorous/clever costumes” to win the costume contest.

“Consider combining your dog’s costume with your own (dressing up isn’t mandatory, but there will be prizes!),” Spafford said in an email. “Remember to make sure your dog feels safe and comfortable in their costume.”

In addition to trick-or-treating and the costume contest, dogs will have the ability to show off their skills on an agility course.

Howl-O-Ween is dog and human friendly, Spafford said.

“It’s a way to get your kids involved in charity work, [as] volunteering is typically unavailable to them for confidentiality, insurance or other reasons at most human service nonprofits, so this is a way to get them connected to the importance of helping others early, so bring the whole family,” she said.

Howl-O-Ween is a charity event, and costs $30 for adults and $20 for children. All proceeds go to helping women and dogs that are victims of abuse.

Immediately after Howl-O-Ween, the Market Common Clarendon will host its annual family-oriented Falloween event from noon to 4 p.m.

There will be live music from children’s entertainer Mr. Knick Knack from noon to 2 p.m., followed by Rainbow Rock Band, from 2-4 p.m.

The free event will also have a petting zoo, face painting and pumpkin decorating. Kids will have the opportunity to go trick-or-treating at local businesses from 1-3:30 p.m.

by ARLnow.com — October 7, 2015 at 10:30 am 0

Varius, a 13-year-old black lab, is retiring from the Arlington County Sheriff’s Office tomorrow after 11 years of service as a narcotics-sniffing K-9 officer.

The dog “will remain in the care of Deputy Patrick Grubar, who has been his partner since teaming up at the U.S. Customs Service K-9 Training Academy in 2004,” the Sheriff’s Office said in a press release. “The duo shared in the Arlington County Crime Solvers 2013 Law Enforcement Officer of the Year award.”

Varius, who’s a senior citizen in dog years, “plans to spend his days watching Animal Planet with his pug ‘little sister’ and keeping up with fans on his Facebook account.”

by Mariah Joyce — August 12, 2015 at 1:30 pm 2,198 0

Romo the dog, a long time beloved fixture of the Adams Morgan neighborhood in D.C., is settling into his new life in Arlington.

The 150 pound bull mastiff/pit bull mix became well known in D.C. for his habit of sleeping near an open window in owner Tiffany Scourby’s condo. Passersby took to the droopy dog, and a Facebook page and Twitter account dedicated to Romo soon sprang up.

Romo, along with Tiffany and her husband Peter Scourby, moved to the Forest Hills townhouse community in the Arlington Ridge neighborhood earlier this summer. So far, Peter says Romo has taken to his new life outside of the city.

“He’s enjoying the space more,” said Scourby. “We went from 1,000 square foot condo to 3,000 square feet.”

Although Scourby says there aren’t any windows in the new home with quite the foot traffic of Romo’s Adams Morgan haunt, the pooch has been given a bed by a window and has scoped out prime napping spots around his new home.

The couple says that like their dog, they are enjoying the newfound space Arlington affords.

“I’m a Virginia boy,” said Scourby. “I like the ‘burbs, and I wanted space. There’s a country club down the street, and I can see the Washington Monument from my house.”

Romo’s Facebook page has more than 3,000 likes and counting, and since moving the couple has discovered that some of their new neighbors are long-time Romo fans.

“When we first got here, a neighbor we hadn’t met yet said, ‘Oh my God, that looks like that Romo dog!,'” said Scourby. “When we told her it was him, she just screamed. Apparently she was one of his followers on Facebook.”

The move to Arlington won’t be the only change for Romo this summer. Peter says Tiffany is eight months pregnant and is due this September.

“[Romo’s] gonna have a little brother soon,” he said.

Photos via Facebook

by Heather Mongilio — August 5, 2015 at 11:15 am 2,108 0

Smyth (courtesy photo)A local law enforcement officer has turned to the Internet in hopes of raising money for her dog’s surgery.

The officer, whose first name is DeDe, set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $800 to cover the medical expenses of veterinary knee surgery. (Ed. note: officer’s last name has removed due to safety concerns.)

Smyth, a 6-year-old Chihuahua, injured his knee while jumping off of a bed to get a toy stuffed monkey, DeDe said. The injury is common for small dogs.

Smyth can still walk, but the veterinarian recommend limiting his movement to stop him from hurting his knee more.

“Despite his injury, he continues to be a loving little dog that keeps trying to play with his brother and neighboring dogs,” says the fundraising page. “Smyth is in need of a surgery that I am unable to fund at this time to repair his patella luxation. I don’t want my little guy to suffer, while I’m trying to save up the money. Any donation help my little guy get back to his fun playful little loving self.”

The surgery, anesthesia and pre- and post-operation care total $800, she said. During the procedure, Smyth will also have to get a heart echo to determine if he has a heart murmur.

“My concern is his treatment being prolonged by trying to raise the funds,” DeDe said. She said she’s usually a private person but is going public with this in order to speed up the treatment.

A couple years ago, her other dog, a Chihuahua named Wessin, had to have a similar surgery on both knees. DeDe said has a special connection with Smyth, who can pick up her moods and try to make her feel better.

“I’d never admit this to the other one [Wessin], but he’s my favorite,” DeDe said.

Two Arlington dog daycares are also helping DeDe raise money. Wag More Dogs (2606 S. Oxford Street) and WOOFS! Dog Training Center (4160 S. Four Mile Run Drive) will hang flyers about Smyth and his surgery, DeDe said.

DeDe did not want the police agency she works for named because she’s raising funds as a private individual and not as a representative of the department.

Courtesy photo

by ARLnow.com — July 28, 2015 at 10:50 am 8,995 0

Charlotte (photo courtesy Mayra Perez)(Updated at 1:25 p.m.) A tow truck accidentally ran over and killed a small dog in Clarendon on Friday, as the truck was in the process of towing a dog walker’s car.

Mayra Perez said she got the news that her 9-year-old Yorkshire Terrier, Charlotte, had been killed while she was in Chicago making preparations for her wedding next month. She took the next flight home.

“Instead of picking out her flower girl dress I’m picking out an urn for her,” Perez said in a phone interview, her voice trembling. “This is the worst possible thing that could happen… we are beyond heartbroken.”

The incident happened around 5:00 p.m. on Friday, on the 1200 block of N. Herndon Street in Clarendon.

According to police, a dog walker who has numerous clients in The Clarendon Apartments had parked illegally in front of the building. Building management called Advanced Towing to tow the car, not realizing that it belonged to a popular dog walker who often parked there while walking dogs in the building.

“As the tow truck was towing the vehicle away, the dog walker approached the driver while walking three dogs,” according to Arlington County Police spokesman Lt. Kip Malcolm. “A conversation or argument occurs and the dog walker asks the driver to pull around so that he can discuss it with management. As the tow truck driver is pulling away, one of the dogs was struck by the back, driver’s side tire and subsequently died.”

John O’Neill, owner of Advanced Towing, said the dog walker was walking away when the tow truck began to move. Unknown to the driver, the dog was on an extended leash and ran under the wheel as the driver began to move, O’Neill said.

“The tow driver is a dog owner and was devastated when he realized the dog had been struck,” O’Neill said. The driver was distraught and was given the rest of the day off, he said.

Perez, however, said that she heard a different version of events from the dog walker and a witness. She blames Advanced Towing for her dog’s death.

“Our girl was not on an extended leash,” she said. “I have the leash and my girls DO NOT use extended leashes.”

“You see this tow company in our neighborhood constantly flying down the street,” she said of Advanced. “It’s lie after lie. I just don’t find it fair. We lost our family member.”

Police investigated the incident but no one was charged. Perez said she and her fiancee, Aakash Desia, are planning on speaking to an attorney.

“It’s been tough… it’s a life changing event,” said Desia. “This is the worst kind of negligence.”

Desia questioned why tow trucks don’t have camera on the sides in order to avoid accidents like this. Perez, meanwhile, is mourning Charlotte and lamenting that she didn’t bring her to Chicago with her, as she usually does. Matilda, Charlotte’s younger Yorkie sister, is also mourning her death.

“Charlotte was loved and spoiled beyond measure,” Perez said. “She will be greatly missed by the both of us and her sister.”

by ARLnow.com — July 25, 2015 at 9:00 pm 5,674 0

Three people and two dogs escaped from a two-alarm house fire on the 700 block of N. Edgewood Street, near Clarendon, this evening.

The fire broke out around 7:00 p.m. in the rear of a three-story house. Residents told ARLnow.com that they rent the house and were playing video games when all of a sudden they noticed a fire in their backyard, which borders the 2700 block of Washington Blvd.

The three people inside the house grabbed the two dogs that were inside and fled for safety, they said. No injuries were reported.

Despite heavy flames and smoke, firefighters were able to largely contain the fire to the house’s back porch and first floor. Washington Blvd was closed in both directions while fire companies from Arlington and Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall battled the blaze.

The county fire marshal is investigating the cause. Residents said they didn’t hear any loud noises before seeing the fire. ARLnow.com spotted a melted electrical meter near the charred rear porch, but a fire department spokesman declined to speculate on a cause.

by ARLnow.com — July 6, 2015 at 9:30 am 2,257 0

Fourth of July 2015 fireworks (Flickr pool photo by Rob Cannon)

Arlington Resident Advances at Wimbledon — Denis Kudla, an Arlington resident, has advanced to the fourth round at Wimbledon. Kudla, 22, is the last American man standing at the tennis tournament. He will face the Croatian Marin Cilic at 10:30 (ET) this morning. [Sporting News, ESPN]

Dog Gone From Penrose — A Penrose resident is working to find her dog, a redbone coonhound, after it got loose and ran away during a party on the Fourth of July. [Facebook]

Fake Valet Takes Man’s Car — A man posing as a valet drove off with the car of a disabled man who was heading to lunch meeting in Crystal City last week. The phony valet even took a $5 tip from the victim. [NBC Washington]

County Bolsters At-Risk Support System — After winning a competitive award from the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown, Arlington County is embarking on a six-month project that seeks to strengthen collaboration among County agencies that serve at-risk youth and families. [Arlington County]

Flickr pool photo by Rob Cannon

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