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by ARLnow.com — July 21, 2016 at 11:20 am 0

Arlington County public service issues mapArlington County is the top “digital county” among those with a population between 150,000 and a quarter million.

That’s according to the Center for Digital Government and the National Association of Counties, which gave Arlington high marks for its tech related to “open government, transparency, citizen engagement, security and operations.”

This is the first time Arlington has achieved the honor.

“We’re proud of this award and for the work that was done this year to help create a more streamlined, responsive and inclusive government using technology,” Arlington County Board Chair Libby Garvey said in a press release (below). “Arlington will continue to innovate and explore new technology tools with the goal of creating the best possible experience for residents and businesses when they interact with the County.”

The county is ahead of the curve in tech in a number of ways. In the past couple of years Arlington has launched a dark fiber network that’s open to businesses, a data-driven smartphone app, online streaming of commission meetings and an “open data portal.”

The full press release from Arlington County, after the jump.

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by Michelle Rosenfeld — July 18, 2016 at 1:30 pm 0

Startup Monday header

Editor’s Note: Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Kam Desai and Ashish Gambhir know first-hand how hard it can be to engage employees.

Working at an analytics company, Desai and Gambhir found that while they could consistently and accurately collect customer feedback and supply it to their clients, negative scores tended to stagnate. For some reason, the necessary quality changes at the store level weren’t getting made.

“We realized that the issue was transparency,” Desai said. “Although restaurants had the right data, it was never getting to the right employees — the men and women on the front line responsible for making each sale. This stuck out as a huge opportunity to improve efficiency, and ultimately, customer service.”

MomentSnap logoDesai and Gambhir decided to develop their own software to fill the gaps.

“MomentSnap is unlike anything else in the marketplace,” Gambhir, co-founder and president, said. “The issue with a lot of engagement strategies surrounding performance is that they’re really not very ‘engaging’ — engagement has become just another box to check off by printing out satisfaction scores and sticking them on a wall somewhere.”

That’s where Arlington-based MomentSnap makes the difference. It puts that information directly in employees’ hands, empowering them to take ownership of their performance in a public forum and compete with their peers.

Using the software, employees accrue points for positive guest feedback and completed “missions” that are set by managers, which can range from upselling certain products to watching a video message from the leadership team. Employees then are ranked and recognized on a public leaderboard. A rewards structure also can be offered to employees, allowing them to use their points for prizes.

“MomentSnap spurs action and tangibly increases customer satisfaction — that’s real engagement,” Desai, co-founder and CEO, said.

Other employee engagement programs often are defined by transactions, rather than relationships, Desai said.

“Instead of seeing a percentage on a sheet of paper that correlates to guest satisfaction, we hope to emphasize that each customer interaction is unique — a moment, not a transaction,” he said. “We make snapshots of these moments available to employees in the form of comments and survey results — a moment snap.”

Gambhir said MomentSnap can be catered to any organization in any industry, but the company has started with a focus on the restaurant, hospitality and retail sectors. He said the company is currently tracking about 50,000 employees and seeing “incredible early success.”

So far, MomentSnap has seen a 10 to 20 percent increase in customer satisfaction among workers using the software, Gambhir said. “We’re seeing that employees are checking the app every shift, even though it’s optional — exceptional usage levels,” he added.

MomentSnap landed in Arlington after receiving an investment from CIT GAP Funds, a group of investment funds placing near-equity and equity investments in Virginia-based organizations.

by Adrian Cruz — July 11, 2016 at 2:15 pm 0

Startup Monday header

Editor’s Note: Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

(Updated at 3:40 p.m.) While on the road as finance consultants and expectant parents, WellNest Home Cleaning founder and CEO Phil Harper and his wife tried to find a cleaning service to clean his home. The experience of finding one was such a negative one that it led him to start his own.

WellNest homepageWellNest is a Clarendon-based startup that makes arranging home cleaning a simple process while also providing quality and detailed service.

“WellNest Home Cleaning is a 100% digital eco-friendly health conscious cleaning service,” said Harper. “What that means is that you can do everything online from booking an appointment, getting a price, scheduling, rescheduling, secure payment, everything’s done online in an easy fashion from your phone or browser.”

With the couple working jobs that kept them away from home for significant periods of time, they had no time to keep the house clean. What he found when trying to choose a cleaning service was that the experience was overly time-consuming and difficult to arrange.

“We went shopping for a cleaning service, looked at reviews, selected some companies we liked, but the process was just very slow,” he said. “We kept having to call and make appointments or have in-home estimates and have to take off work. Whenever we wanted to reschedule, we had to play phone tag, leave voicemails, we kept on missing appointments.”

There was also the issue of payment — many traditional cleaning companies only took cash or check, with no credit card or online payment option.

While Harper found companies that did use the “Uber model” for home cleaning, he also found that the quality wasn’t to standard, something that he addressed when starting his own business.

Before the cleaner leaves the home, he or she uses a 60-point checklist to ensure that every detail on the list has been taken care of during the cleaning and they also leave a personalized note to reflect on the quality of service that the customer receives.

WellNest uses an online booking platform that makes it easy to arrange a home cleaning. The website gives customers an immediate quote depending on the number of bedrooms and bathrooms the house or apartment has, with a 1 bed, 1 bath apartment costing $70 for a single cleaning. Extras such as cleaning the interior of the refrigerator or oven are available for an additional fee.

It also gives the option to “subscribe” to a cleaning schedule, which reduces the price depending on how often per month the cleaning is scheduled. After that, the website then goes to a scheduling platform where the customer can choose the time and date they want their cleaning done.

In order to reduce costs that are passed on to the consumer and employees, WellNest uses a central storage facility for its cleaning materials and cleaners use Uber instead of company-owned or personal vehicles to reach their destinations.

“We solve a pain point with apartment complexes in Arlington because of the parking issues here,” he said. “Instead of having office space and vehicles or having to use our own personal vehicles, we actually use storage units and Uber to get around. The storage units are right in town. Our cleaners show up, get their cleaning supplies, call Uber, it picks them up, takes them to the home they’re cleaning; they go on up, clean the home, come back down, call Uber again, and go on to the next job.”

His experience as a father influenced his business in other ways. On his search to find a cleaning service, Harper wanted one that used cleaning products that were non-toxic and eco friendly. Knowing firsthand about the damaging effects that traditional cleaning products such as bleach have, WellNest uses mostly cleaning products that are non-toxic, made of water, vinegar and lemon oil. Traditional cleaning agents are reserved for only the toughest jobs.

“We spent several months trying various vendors of health-oriented cleaning supplies and what we landed on was a company called Eco-Me,” said Harper. “We found them through trial and error, tried it in our own home and loved it. We use them exclusively now.”

As of now, WellNest mainly operates in the Arlington, Alexandria and Falls Church area, although Harper says that the company plans to expand into D.C, Reston, and deeper into Virginia. Its offices are based at the new MakeOffices Clarendon co-working space.

by ARLnow.com — July 8, 2016 at 9:15 am 0

Dogs cools off and play at the James Hunter Dog Park (photo by Jackie Friedman)

ACPD Shrouds Badges — Arlington County Police are shrouding their badges in honor of the police officers killed in last night’s shooting rampage in Dallas. [Twitter]

Gondola Meeting Held — Local residents attended a meeting last night in Rosslyn about the study into the feasibility of a Rosslyn-to-Georgetown gondola system. The architecture firm leading the study says its goal is “proving the system isn’t going to be just a toy for tourists” and “to prove that it can be transit and it can be a great experience.” One Arlington resident quoted by WTOP, Dave Schutz, said his goal was “to free my wife from that deepest inner circle from hell, which is the Georgetown Hospital parking garage.” [WTOP]

Tech Startup Moves from D.C. to Rosslyn — Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe was on hand Wednesday to announce that civic engagement software maker Phone2Action would be moving from D.C. to leased office space in Rosslyn and bringing some 142 jobs with it. [Washington Business Journal, Patch]

Arlington Featured in Book About Walking — Arlington County is one of nine communities features in “America’s Walking Renaissance,” a new book about walkable cities in the United States. [Arlington County]

Arlington Runner Achieves Goal — An Arlington resident with cerebral palsy has achieved her goal of completing 34 races by her 34th birthday. [WUSA]

by ARLnow.com — June 24, 2016 at 9:30 am 0

Flowers

Arlington GOP Votes Down Anti-Trump Measure — The Arlington County Republican Committee voted 27-10 against a proposal that would support an anti-Donald Trump coup at the Republican presidential-nominating convention. “Supporters of the resolution, which called on delegates to the upcoming national convention in Cleveland to be freed to vote their consciences, said the Republican brand would suffer with Trump at the top of the ticket in November.” [InsideNova]

Snagajob Makes Big Acquisition — Local tech firm Snagajob may “need more space in our beloved Arlington” after acquiring Peoplematter, another hourly job marketplace. [Twitter, Snagajob]

Arlington Built Temporary Bikeway — During the Air Force Cycling Classic bike races in Clarendon, Arlington County converted a block of Wilson Blvd into an “Active Streets Festival” with “bike-oriented games and activities, plus a collection of temporary bikeways ‘built’ with tape, paper, and potted plants.” [Greater Greater Washington]

‘Bike to the Beach’ Happy Hour — A happy hour is being held from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday on the Whitlow’s rooftop in Clarendon for “Bike to the Beach,” which raises funds for The Autism Society of Northern Virginia and Autism Speaks. Bike to the Beach is a 100+ mile bike ride from D.C. to Dewey Beach, Delaware to raise money and awareness for autism. [Event Calendar]

Anti-Gang Soccer Tournament — On Sunday the Arlington Gang Prevention Task Force will hold an all-day soccer tournament at Washington-Lee High School. “No city or town is immune to gangs,” said Robert “Tito” Vilchez, the task force coordinator. [Arlington County]

by ARLnow.com — June 15, 2016 at 3:00 pm 0

iPadStudents at some Arlington elementary schools will be allowed to take their school-issued iPads home for the summer.

Letters were sent to parents of eligible students last week, asking them to “supervise and monitor your child while on the device” but also giving them the option of refusing the take-home iPad.

“The decision to allow students to take the APS issued iPads home over the summer is made individually by the administration at each school,” said Arlington Public Schools spokesman Frank Bellavia. “We are excited for the opportunity for our students to be able to extend their learning over the summer through access to high quality digital resources including curriculum specific tools as well as thousands of eBooks through the APS Library and Arlington Public Library systems.”

The letter sent to parents of Hoffman-Boston Elementary students, after the jump. A full list of the schools allowing take-home iPads was not immediately available.

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by Michelle Rosenfeld — May 16, 2016 at 12:25 pm 0

Startup Monday header

Editor’s Note: Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Screenshot

From school permission slips to executing wills and closing on home purchases, notarizations are part of small and large decisions in everyone’s lives. But it can’t always be easy to find a notary when and where you need one.

Crystal City-based Notarize has an app for that.

At $25 a pop, users can obtain notarizations virtually anywhere, at any time.

In 2011, a law passed in Virginia enabled certain certified state notaries to complete notarizations through a video call. Notarizations made in Virginia are valid across state lines under state and federal laws.

Notarize screenshotWith nearly 1.25 billion notarizations taking place in the U.S. annually, the founders of Notarize saw a real “pain point” that could be addressed using technology and the new Virginia law.

“My partner was traveling when he realized an important financial transaction that required notarization wasn’t executed properly and he couldn’t find a notary to fix it,” Adam Pase, co-founder and COO of Notarize, said. “It delayed the transaction for weeks.”

The founders of Notarize jumped on the idea of virtual notarization, getting ahead of the curve.

“Notarization may not be the sexiest area to focus on, so I don’t think a lot of people were directing a lot of attention to the notarization process,” Pase said.

The company’s work paid off – more than 1,000 documents were notarized through the mobile app in the first six weeks after it launched.

Notarize co-founder Adam PasePase said Notarize aims to keep users’ wait times to less than three minutes.

Right now, 40 notaries are working with the company, but Pase said Notarize has received more than 100 additional applications.

“News has spread and we’re really excited to have so many notaries interested in our platform,” Pase said.

And Notarize isn’t just for individual consumers. Businesses stand to gain a lot from the virtual notary service, according to Pase.

Notarize co-founder Pat KinselBusinesses – such as mortgage companies, banks, legal firms, construction companies and more – can use Notarize to streamline their operations, onboard customers and create a completely digital audit trail. So far, Pase said the company has received “tremendous interest” from businesses.

Pase said the company was drawn to Crystal City because of the proximity to D.C. and many of the key decision makers and customers it was targeting.

“Northern Virginia has become a hotbed for technology companies and Crystal City has some exciting momentum in the startup tech world,” Pase said. In this area, he added, Notarize was “confident we could get the talent we need.”

Notarize currently is available as an iOS application for Apple devices, as well as a desktop application. Pase said the company has plans to make the service even more accessible in the future.

by ARLnow.com — May 9, 2016 at 1:10 pm 0

WeLive in Crystal CityYou read about the new WeLive facility in Crystal City here last week.

Next week, you can hear about it and see it for yourself.

ARLnow is holding an after-work event on Tuesday, May 17 called WeWork, WeLive and the Future of City Living. It’s taking place from 6-8 p.m. at WeWork (2221 S. Clark Street).

After some networking and refreshments, Sarah Fraser will host a discussion with Dave McLaughlin, WeWork’s General Manager for the Eastern U.S. and Canada. We’ll talk about the technology, design and the planning behind WeLive, and why it might be a future model for urban residential.

We’ll also be talking with Angela Fox, President of the Crystal City Business Improvement District and a current WeLive resident. The event is sponsored by Vornado and the Crystal City BID.

Space is limited. Tickets are available via Eventbrite.

by ARLnow.com — May 6, 2016 at 1:45 pm 0

Just over a month ago, ARLnow held a discussion about Arlington’s tech industry, in what is perhaps the epicenter of the county’s tech scene: Crystal City.

The event, sponsored by Vornado and the Crystal City BID, featured host Sarah Fraser and the following local innovators.

Above is the video from the event, courtesy of Arlington Independent Media.

So what did we learn? Here are just a few of the questions and answers.

Tell us a bit about your company.

Phillips: “Shift is a two-year-old startup that makes car resale easier. We handle all the paperwork, and take the stress out of it.”

Why do your companies choose Arlington?

Sundaram: “For us Arlington was a natural choice. Arlington offered a large residential piece and retail… [for] our employees who live nearby. It worked out geographically.”

What are some of the best opportunities for local tech?

Sundaram: “I think that there are a lot of high-tech companies but also lots of startups, so we get a balanced ecosystem. We are also in the D.C. area, this area has access to lots of political conversation.

What is your company working on right now?

Orazem: “We are creating a forum for people to ask questions about government cuts and revenue.”

You have offices all over the world, how do you keep everyone on the same page?

Fuccillo: “Big business problems in a small business is never good, we have to have really good communication. Webinar-based meetings with webcams definitely helps us connect a little bit better.”

Quotes compiled by Justin Funkhouser

by ARLnow.com — May 5, 2016 at 10:30 am 0

Long Branch Nature Center woods (Flickr pool photo by James L.)

County Board Contenders Debate — The two Democratic contenders for Arlington County Board, incumbent Libby Garvey and challenger Erik Gutshall, debated who would be the most transparent and the best agent of change last night. Gutshall criticized Garvey for the lack of action on new transit options for Columbia Pike and for supporting the creation of a “blue ribbon panel” to study county priorities. [InsideNova, Washington Post]

Residents Concerned About Sex Offender — Some residents in the Bluemont neighborhood and the area around Bon Air Park are concerned about a registered sex offender who recently moved to the area. There have been reports of the man watching children’s soccer games and leaving balloons in the backyard of a family home. Police say they’re investigating. [Fox 5]

Vornado Attracting Millennials With Cool Restaurants — “Vornado has carefully curated its retail in Crystal City and Pentagon City to appeal to creative Millennials, bringing in tenants like DIY design and fabrication space TechShop and hip restaurants like We The Pizza, Sweetgreen and Taylor Gourmet, which just opened Monday. That’s not to mention the Whole Foods anchoring the retail section of Vornado’s The Bartlett, a trendy ‘city within a city’ with nearly 700 residential units.” [Bisnow]

Chinese News Agency Profiles Arlington’s Tech Scene — Xinhua, the state-run news agency that’s said to be the largest and most influential media organization in China, has published a feature story that discusses how Arlington has become a “hot spot for tech startups.” The story notes that in addition to a robust talent pool and the availability of investment capital, “government has also played a vital role in the development of startups in Arlington.” [Xinhua]

Outdoor Lab to Celebrate 50th Anniversary — The Arlington Outdoor Lab, a nonprofit facility that hosts more than 9,000 students annually for outdoor and environmental education, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with an event in Ballston next month. [Arlington Outdoor Lab]

Flickr pool photo by James L.

by ARLnow.com — May 4, 2016 at 3:05 pm 0

Much of the media narrative around WeLive, which just opened in Crystal City, has to do with the size of the apartments and how it’s kind of like living in a college dorm.

Yes, your narrow apartment with a Murphy bed is not the Palace of Versailles. And yes, like a dorm your WeLive apartment comes furnished and with the expectation that your neighbor could be your next best friend.

But dorms generally don’t have, among other things, built-in Bose sound systems, custom-designed West Elm furniture and free fruit-infused water in the lobby. And thanks to some clever, efficient design, even the smallest WeLive studio doesn’t feel cramped.

WeLive is a much more ambitious effort than just trying to figure out how to cram humans into as small a space as possible while maintaining an aura of high-end living. As its leaders will tell you, it’s a new paradigm for living in cities.

The WeLive experience could be described as “asset light.” Your furniture, kitchen equipment, linens, towels, plus your TV, sound system, cable, Wi-fi and utilities are all included. If you’re moving here you don’t have to pack a moving van, instead you show up with your suitcase and your laptop, then make a quick trip to the grocery store and you’re good to go.

The trip to the grocery store might even be optional. The building offers free coffee, tea and — yes — beer, and the move-in kit includes hangers, Co. Bigelow toiletries and a Harry’s shave kit.

Unlike your typical apartment, there is a social component to WeLive. Sure, other buildings might have a cocktail hour or exercise class, but here it’s assumed that you will actually get to know your fellow residents — at least those in your three-story “neighborhood” (there are three neighborhoods in the Crystal City WeLive/WeWork building.) Common areas like the big flat screen TV and video game lounge are hubs of activity, as are a dining area and breakfast nook.

WeLive somehow manages to use internet-connected technology to make the living experience more personal, instead of using it to help people disconnect from in-person contact. A dedicated WeLive app tells residents when there’s free pizza in the kitchen, Game of Thrones on the big TV or a WeLive-organized fitness or cooking class or other activity happening. You can also send messages to your fellow residents, if need be.

One might expect WeLive to be a haven for ramen-noodle-eating, single 20-somethings, but so far that’s not entirely the case. Yes, there are recent college grads working on the lower rungs of tech startups. But there are also older professionals and executives giving it a try. The oldest resident WeLive resident, we’re told, is in his 60s. At least one friendly dog has taken up residence with his 30-something owner — the building is pet friendly.

Company officials are calling WeLive an experiment and are paying close attention to how things go in Crystal City. The location is a slightly more suburban parallel to the only other WeLive location currently open — on Wall Street in Manhattan. Both types of location are important to a company that says it wants to provide a “disruptive alternative to the way people live.”

The Crystal City WeLive is located at 2221 S. Clark Street, a former office building it shares with a WeWork co-working space, and has 216 total units, with 1-4 beds and 1-2 private bathrooms apiece.

Monthly prices, excluding the flat $125/month utility fee, start at $875 for an individual bed or $1,640 for a private unit, according to the WeLive website.

by ARLnow.com — April 13, 2016 at 11:30 am 0

Waze map for part of ArlingtonArlington County is likely to join Google’s Connected Citizens Program, which shares road condition and traffic data gathered from its Waze app with localities across the country and around the world.

The County Board is expected to give its okay to joining the program at its meeting on Saturday.

“Launched by Google in October 2014, the Program exchanges transportation data with local law enforcement agencies, cities, state DOTs, and countries around the world,” wrote county staff.

It’s a two-way exchange — the County would be sharing road closure information while Waze would be sharing crash, traffic and road condition reports, as submitted by the app’s users.

“With the County sharing up-to-date disruptive event information with Waze, the County is contributing to the safety of drivers and easing traffic congestion by allowing drivers to re-route in real time,” county staff write. “The County intends to integrate the Waze reported incident data into the County’s My Arlington mobile app to provide enhanced real-time reporting of high impact traffic disruptions in Arlington.”

by ARLnow.com — March 28, 2016 at 7:30 am 0

Cloudy sunset (Flickr pool photo by John Sonderman)

Buyers Found for Market Common — A pair of buyers has reportedly been found for the Market Common mixed-use development in Clarendon. Regency Centers and AvalonBay are said to be partnering to buy the shopping center and apartment complex for $410 million. [GlobeSt.com]

Lyon Park Gun Store Opens — After a month of controversy, Nova Armory opened its doors on Saturday, with dozens of gun enthusiasts showing up to support the store. In a rally nearby, local lawmakers urged residents to continue the fight against the store, but said that due to Virginia law there was nothing else they could legally do to prevent the shop from opening. [Washington Post]

Teen Employment Expo Scheduled — Teens seeking summer jobs and employers seeking seasonal help will be meeting next month at Arlington’s 2016 Teen Summer Expo. The expo, on April 23 at Wakefield High School, is expected to attract some 1,200 teens looking for summer jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities. [Arlington County]

Arlington Tech Event Tomorrow — There’s one day left before ARLnow.com’s Arlington Tech discussion and networking event. The event is taking place starting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Highline RxR (2010 Crystal Drive) in Crystal City. Food and a drink will be provided. [Eventbrite]

Flickr pool photo by John Sonderman

by ARLnow.com — March 18, 2016 at 9:30 am 0

Daffodils along the Mt. Vernon Trail (Flickr pool photo by Erinn Shirley)

Ashton Heights Takes Stance Against Gun Store — More than 100 members of the Ashton Heights Civic Association voted last night on whether or not to take a position against the planned gun store in nearby Lyon Park. Fully 93 percent of those voting said they supported the civic association expressing opposition to the store, according to the group Act4LyonPark.

Retiring School Board Chair Recognized — At last night’s Arlington School Board meeting, Del. Alfonso Lopez read the joint resolution passed in the state legislature commending Dr. Emma Violand-Sanchez, who’s retiring as School Board Chair at the end of her term this year. [Katch, Twitter]

Raccoon Checks Out Home’s Toilet, Leaves — A woman in the Columbia Forest neighborhood called police after finding animal footprints on a toilet seat. The responding animal control officer determined that a raccoon had come down the chimney, apparently traipsed around the toilet and left. [Twitter]

GOP Convention Delegate Selection Gets Interesting — The prospect of a contested convention has made the selection of three delegates to represent Virginia’s Eighth Congressional District more interesting. At a recent Arlington County Republican Committee meeting, would-be delegates were asked who they would support for president. A reporter present didn’t hear anyone say Donald Trump. [InsideNova, InsideNova]

Condo for Sale Has a Unique Map of D.C. — A one-bedroom condo for sale in Rosslyn has a custom-designed map of D.C. painted across one of the walls. The mural was created by one of the current owners, who happens to be a former cartographer. [Washington Post]

Ouli Gets Attention from Local Tech Scene — “First Look: Could ‘Ouli’ Be the Concierge App for DC?” asks a new headline from a D.C. tech publication. The app’s creator, a software development firm on Lee Highway that has up until now served just corporate clients, says for now the app is focused solely on serving the Arlington market. [DC Inno]

Flickr pool photo by Erinn Shirley

by ARLnow.com — March 17, 2016 at 5:05 pm 0

Arlington tech eventIn less than two weeks, ARLnow.com will be holding a networking event and discussion about Arlington’s growing tech industry.

With tech firms moving to Arlington, expanding in Arlington and the continued growth of incubators, co-working spaces and even tech-inspired co-living spaces, there’s a lot happening here.

Here’s the current lineup of innovators who will be discussing their business and their take on the local tech scene:

The event will be hosted by Sarah Fraser, Fox 5 contributor and founder of the Hey Frase podcast. Representatives from Arlington Economic Development will also be on hand to discuss the resources available to startups in Arlington.

Details about the event are below.

Day: Tuesday, March 29
Time: 5:30-8 p.m. (program runs from 6:30-7:30)
Venue: Highline RxR (2010 Crystal Drive)
Tickets: $10 online, includes food and drink ticket

Thank you to our co-sponsors, Vornado and the Crystal City Business Improvement District.

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