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A minor typo along Route 50 in the Rosslyn area has been fixed, to the relief of local pedants.

A directional sign along westbound Route 50 (Arlington Blvd), as one travels through the Rosslyn and Courthouse areas, has long read “14Th Street.” Just days after the error was pointed out to VDOT on social media, the erroneous capital-T was finally replaced late last week.

https://twitter.com/VaDOTNOVA/status/1435271461669908489

“The letter was replaced on the sign on Friday, September 10!” confirmed VDOT spokeswoman Ellen Kamilakis, who runs the celebrated VDOT Northern Virginia Twitter account. She said tips from the public help the agency correct minor problems across its expansive transportation network.

“Our Transportation Field Operations (TFO) group handles the maintenance of all signs, signals, and pavement markings in our District,” said Kamilakis. “We have more than 250,000 signs and 1,400 signalized intersections, so [while] crews always keep a look out for items that need to be fixed, we always encourage residents to reach out to us if they see an issue somewhere. People can let our Customer Service Center know via https://my.vdot.virginia.gov/ or 800-FOR-ROAD.”

Social media — Twitter, specifically — is a popular means of reporting issues, but unlike the VDOT website and hotline it’s more of an informal channel.

“We try to be as helpful as possible on social media,” said Kamilakis, who regularly provides safety tips and general, lighthearted life advice in the form of a “Morning MeeMaw Nag.”

“We answer all of the questions that can be reasonably answered on social media,” Kamilakis added. “Our Twitter community mainly reports downed signs, potholes, signals on flash, debris in the road, drainage issues, etc. As these aren’t formal customer service requests through the system, I simply reach out to those in charge of said areas and they are always happy to help.”

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A car flipped on its roof this afternoon near Westover, injuring the person driving it.

The crash happened around 2:30 p.m. along Washington Blvd, near 19th Road N., west of Westover and east of East Falls Church. The road was completely blocked by the emergency response.

A witness to the aftermath of the crash tells ARLnow that bystanders pulled the driver out of the overturned vehicle. The driver was taken via ambulance to a nearby hospital, though the person’s injuries did not appear to be serious, we’re told.

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Update at 5 p.m. on Aug. 23 — Glebe Road is now expected to reopen on Monday, Aug. 30.

Earlier: The planned nine-day closure of N. Glebe Road near Chain Bridge is getting longer.

Glebe is currently blocked in both directions between Military Road and Chain Bridge Road for the culmination of a $10 million bridge rehabilitation project. Crews have been working since Friday, Aug. 13 to replace steel beams and the deck of the bridge over Pimmit Run.

But the work zone was damaged today by significant flooding of Pimmit Run and the toppling of two trees and some utility lines. The damage is expected to cause significant delays for the project and the road’s reopening.

From VDOT:

There is a work stoppage on the Glebe Road over Pimmit Run bridge rehabilitation project. Two trees have fallen into the work zone, along with power and cable lines, as well as flooding. This will significantly delay the planned reopening of Glebe Road, originally scheduled for Monday. Once the work zone can be rendered safe and crews can assess the damage, an updated reopening date will be provided.

The department posted video of the flooding on social media, showing raging brown water flowing under the bridge and into the Potomac nearby.

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Update at 3:25 p.m. — The closure has been extended due to flooding at the construction site.

All lanes of N. Glebe Road between Military Road and Chain Bridge Road, in the northern tip of Arlington, will be closed for construction starting Friday.

The nine-day closure is the culmination of the $10 million rehabilitation project for the nearly 50-year-old bridge over Pimmit Run, just before Chain Bridge. Between Friday, Aug. 13 and Monday, Aug. 23, crews will work to replace the entire bridge deck and its underlying beams.

A winding detour around the closure, through parts of Arlington and McLean, will be put in place. Pedestrians and cyclists hoping to cross Pimmit Run will have an on-demand shuttle available to them during the closure, according to the Virginia Dept. of Transportation.

More from a VDOT press release:

North Glebe Road (Route 120) between Military Road and Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) will be closed to traffic for about nine days beginning Friday night, Aug. 13 to efficiently replace the entire bridge deck and beams over Pimmit Run, just west of Route 123, according to the Virginia Department of Transportation.

North Glebe Road will close at 10 p.m. Aug. 13 and is scheduled to reopen to traffic by 5 a.m. Monday, Aug. 23.

Vehicle traffic will be detoured via Route 123, Kirby Road (Route 695) and Chesterbrook Road (Route 689) back to North Glebe Road.

To help pedestrians get around the closure, a free shuttle for up to 12 passengers will be available Saturday, Aug. 14 through Sunday, Aug. 22 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day. Signs and posters with a phone number (240-300-3264) and shuttle information will be posted at both ends of the bridge over Pimmit Run, with the shuttle provided within ten minutes of a call (if needed, a free accessible shuttle will be provided within 30 minutes of a call). Each shuttle ride will last approximately five minutes.

The portion of the Potomac Heritage Trail under the Pimmit Run bridge will remain open, with trail access controlled by flaggers when needed.

Construction began in April on the overall project to rehabilitate North Glebe Road over Pimmit Run, which was originally built in 1973 and currently carries about 13,000 vehicles a day. The work includes improvements that will extend the overall life of the bridge and improve safety for drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians. They include:

  • Replacing bridge beams, deck and barriers
  • Repairing, waterproofing and providing corrosion protection to abutments and piers
  • Replacing barriers and railings along bicycle and pedestrian connection to trails
  • Upgrading guardrails and drainage

The $9.9 million project is financed with federal and state funds, including State of Good Repair funding used for bridges. The project is scheduled for completion this fall.

Learn more about the project at www.virginiadot.org/glebeoverpimmit.

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If you’re heading to or from Chain Bridge on N. Glebe Road today or tomorrow, expect delays.

VDOT’s ongoing rehabilitation work on the Pimmit Run bridge — west of Chain Bridge and Chain Bridge Road — is prompting lane closures from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. Flaggers will alternate the traffic flow between Military Road and Chain Bridge Road during that time, likely causing delays.

Drivers, cyclists and pedestrians will all be “under flagging direction,” the state transportation agency noted.

The bridge work is expected to wrap up this fall.

More from a VDOT press release:

North Glebe Road (Route 120) between Military Road and Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) will have single-lane closures, weather permitting, Wednesday, June 23 and Thursday, June 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day to place temporary support beams on the bridge over Pimmit Run as part of the North Glebe Road over Pimmit Run bridge rehabilitation project, according to the Virginia Department of Transportation.

North Glebe Road will have one lane of alternating traffic via flagging along the bridge over Pimmit Run. The traffic signal at North Glebe Road and Route 123 will be turned off during the work and traffic will be controlled via flagging through the intersection. Also under flagging direction will be pedestrians and bicyclists using the path along the bridge over Pimmit Run, and pedestrians using the Potomac Heritage Trail under the bridge.

Drivers should expect delays and are advised to use alternate routes.

The work is part of the North Glebe Road over Pimmit Run bridge rehabilitation project that includes:

  • Replacing bridge beams, deck and barriers
  • Repairing, waterproofing and providing corrosion protection to abutments and piers
  • Replacing barriers and railings along bicycle and pedestrian connection to trails
  • Upgrading guardrails and drainage

The project is scheduled for completion this fall.

Photo (3) via Google Maps

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(Updated at 2:15 p.m.) One person was hospitalized after a crash that sent one vehicle careening off the road and onto its side near Yorktown High School this morning.

The two-vehicle crash happened around 7:15 a.m. at the intersection of Yorktown Blvd and N. Harrison Street, about two blocks from the high school.

“Units quickly arrived on scene and found a 2 vehicle crash with 1 vehicle off the roadway, on its side,” said Lt. Nate Hiner, a spokesman for the Arlington County Fire Department.

“Crews found that there was one patient trapped in the vehicle on its side and went to work stabilizing and extricating a single patient from that vehicle,” Hiner said. “That patient was quickly removed from vehicle and transported to an area hospital with minor injuries.”

There’s no word as to what led to the crash.

Photo courtesy Ed L.

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An SUV flipped on its side in the Dominion Hills neighborhood Friday evening.

The rollover crash happened on N. Larrimore Street near Wilson Blvd. Only a single occupied vehicle appeared to have been involved.

Firefighters helped to stabilize the overturned Toyota and assisted the vehicle’s occupants. Minor injuries were reported.

Jay Westcott contributed to this report

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Lyon’s Legacy is a limited-run opinion column on the history of housing in Arlington. The views expressed are solely the author’s.

The H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program is housed today at 1601 Wilson Boulevard, a hundred-million-dollar building located not far from the place in Rosslyn where, a little over a century ago, a posse fired at a fleeing Black man because white landowners wanted to make the county more profitable for real-estate development.

But when I was a student at the H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program, it was housed at 4100 Vacation Lane. That building had once been Stratford Junior High School, and on February 2nd, 1959, it was the first school in the Commonwealth of Virginia to be racially integrated.

When I skipped class for pizza, my slices came from the same shopping strip where, in 1960, Howard University students faced off against the American Nazi Party in sit-ins that desegregated eateries across Arlington, Alexandria, and Fairfax. We studied that history with pride during my four years at H-B. We may even have studied the 1968 Supreme Court decision that made racially-restrictive covenants — Lyon’s bluntest tool — illegal across the nation.

Dion Diamond, Joan Trumpauer, and Ethelene Crockett face harassment at the Cherrydale Drug Fair during their sit-in on June 10, 1960 (photo via washington_area_spark/Flickr)

But somehow, despite Arlington’s proud history of civil rights activism, my H-B graduating class of perhaps 90 students included only three or four who were Black. The number of other racial and ethnic minorities, and of low-income white students, was also disproportionately small. We studied school integration, sit-ins, and voting rights at H-B Woodlawn. What we did not study were the ways that implicitly-racist policies, like exclusive zoning, survived that activism and remain with us today.

This is the sixth part of Lyon’s Legacy, a biweekly series (you can read the whole thing, with citations, here). This series is not intended to claim that Frank Lyon or his developments are uniquely responsible for Arlington’s present problems. Rather, the particular story of Lyon is meant to illustrate the broader history of how economically-exclusive zoning, established a century ago in an atmosphere of white supremacy, still dominates our county and our nation today.

In Frank Lyon’s time, just decades after Emancipation, Black Americans usually — though of course not always — had less money to spend on housing than white Americans did. By creating large lots and banning missing-middle housing, developers of the time ensured that their homes would be so expensive that low-income people, including most Black people, couldn’t afford them.

That was the beginning of a two-handed strategy that keeps Black families out of places like Arlington to this day. With one hand, as we saw two weeks ago, local and federal governments adopted the technique, pioneered by Lyon and his peers across the country, of economic exclusion through car-oriented, low-density land use. With the other, the same governments limited financial and employment opportunities for Black people, trapping many in a cycle of poverty. By the time that explicitly-racist policies were curtailed in the 1960s and ’70s, the damage had been done, and most Black people were priced out of most suburbs.

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If you see some fresh red paint on the pavement in Arlington, that’s a lane that has been designated for use by buses only.

County crews could be seen painting the new lane markers in Courthouse last week.

The new “bus only priority lanes and stops” are intended “to help improve transit safety, service and reliability,” Arlington Dept. of Environmental Services spokeswoman Kathryn O’Brien tells ARLnow.

Seven red-painted portions of roadway are planned throughout the county, O’Brien said, including:

  • 27th Street S. and Potomac Avenue in Crystal City
  • 33rd Street S. and Crystal Drive in Crystal City
    S. Hayes Street and 12th Street S. in Pentagon City
  • Crystal Drive and 26th Street S. in Crystal City
  • 15th Street N. and N. Uhle Street in Courthouse
  • Clarendon Blvd and N. Uhle Street in Courthouse
  • Wilson Blvd and N. Uhle Street in Courthouse

“They should all be completed within the next week,” O’Brien said of the painting effort.

Photo courtesy Lisa C.

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(Updated at 3 p.m.) A crash closed lanes and snarled traffic on the GW Parkway this morning.

Initial reports suggest that a male driver crashed head-on into a tree near the first scenic overlook around 11:30 a.m. Arlington County firefighters were able to get him out of the vehicle; the extent of the man’s injuries were not immediately clear.

As a result of the crash and the emergency response, northbound traffic on the GW Parkway was diverted onto Spout Run Parkway. Heavy traffic and one or more lane closures were also reported on the southbound GW Parkway.

By about 2 p.m. all lanes had reopened, according to Arlington County.

Image via Google Maps

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(Updated at 3:30 p.m.) Arlington County police and firefighters responded to a potentially serious motorcycle crash today in the Lyon Park neighborhood, south of Clarendon.

The crash was reported around 1:30 p.m. Friday at the intersection of 4th Street N. and N. Edgewood Street, in a residential neighborhood between Washington Blvd and the Lyon Park Community Center.

According to initial reports, a car and a motorcycle collided at the intersection, and the motorcycle rider suffered serious injuries. The car careened into a nearby yard after the collision.

The motorcycle rider was rushed to a local trauma center and was last reported to be in stable condition, according to Arlington County Fire Department spokesman Taylor Blunt. No other injuries were reported.

The intersection, like many in Arlington, is a two-way stop: traffic heading towards and from Washington Blvd has a stop sign, while traffic on N. Edgewood Street does not.

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