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by Tim Regan — February 2, 2017 at 10:15 am 0

A national purveyor of women’s clothing has quietly shuttered its shop in Clarendon.

The Chico’s at Market Common Clarendon (2700 Clarendon Blvd) is now closed. The store’s exterior sign has been removed and its windows are now covered with paper. The location also is no longer listed on the company’s website.

It wasn’t clear what might replace the clothing retailer. Arlington County has not recently issued any building permits for the address.

A Chico’s representative wasn’t immediately available for comment. The company currently has another Arlington location at 1101 S. Joyce Street on Pentagon Row.

by Tim Regan — January 31, 2017 at 10:20 am 0

(Updated at 10:53 a.m.) A new fitness studio is now open on the ground floor of the Beacon at Clarendon apartment building.

The business, Neighborhood Barre, opened its doors at 1148 N. Irving Street about two weeks ago, according to franchise owner Eileen McCarthy.

Neighborhood Barre offers workouts that mix dance conditioning, pilates and isometric exercise techniques. This is the first D.C.-area gym for the company, which has locations in Tennessee and Alabama.

McCarthy, a longtime barre enthusiast, said she got the idea to open the studio after many years of trying different kinds of exercise routines.

“I had been doing barre workouts on my own,” McCarthy said. “It was a big stress reliever for me. It’s intense, but it’s not off-the-wall intense.”

The ballet-inspired barre workouts are suitable for people of any fitness level, she added.

Though she considered several other locations, McCarthy said opening a fitness studio in Clarendon was a “no brainer.”

“It’s just such a good mix of people and densely populated,” she said.

Neighborhood Barre currently offers five classes each weekday and three classes on Saturday and Sunday, but more classes are on the way, McCarthy said.

by ARLnow.com — January 28, 2017 at 9:00 am 0

Vanessa Reisis, along with her husband and kids, have been running Goody’s Pizza (3125 Wilson Blvd) since it opened in Clarendon in 2006.

When we checked in with “Momma Goody” last summer, she said the family-owned shop was struggling to keep up with high rent and lots of competition.

But there’s good news: since then business has picked up and Reisis is confident that Goody’s will be able to renew its lease and keep serving the shop’s loyal customers for years to come.

We talked about that and more on this week’s 26 Square Miles podcast. Listen below or subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Google PlayStitcher or TuneIn.

Also, be sure to check out this week’s sponsor, Crystal Couture, which starts next Thursday, Feb. 2, in Crystal City.

by Tim Regan — January 26, 2017 at 4:45 pm 0

The Arlington County Board is considering giving its blessing to several easements needed for a long-awaited plan to revamp a tricky intersection in Clarendon.

The Board is scheduled to vote this weekend on easements needed to improve the “Clarendon Circle” intersection at Washington, Wilson and Clarendon boulevards.

If approved, the county will pay the Catholic Diocese of Arlington nearly $25,000 for permanent and temporary easements on a portion of church property along Washington Blvd, to be used for sidewalk, curb, gutter, utilities and drainage purposes.

The overall plan calls for improvements to “access and safety for those who walk, bike and drive.” The project’s goals include upgrades such as improved traffic signals and streetlights, wider center medians, shorter pedestrian crossings, bike lanes and curb extensions.

“Current travel across the intersection can be difficult due to its extreme width and the skewed alignment of its roadways,” according to a County webpage. “North Irving Street also enters the circle area in two offset locations, further complicating the traffic pattern.”

This wasn’t the only idea that Arlington County considered. Roundabouts, one-way street couplets and other alternative designs all were analyzed, but the County found those elements “would have negative impacts on all modes of transportation, especially for pedestrians.”

If all goes according to plan, the engineering design will be completed this spring, clearing the way for construction to begin next summer. Project completion is pegged for the summer of 2019.

by Tim Regan — January 25, 2017 at 2:10 pm 0

(Updated on Friday at 5:06 p.m.) Clarendon restaurant Ambar will open a sister cafe, restaurant and cocktail lounge called Baba next week.

The business, named after the Serbian word for grandmother, is slated to open in the basement level of 2901 Wilson Blvd by Wednesday, Feb. 1.

Owner Ivan Iricanin said the new hangout is meant to conjure the kind of warm, homey feeling one might get when visiting their grandmother’s house.

“You get fed well, you get treated well, you always have a fire,” Iricanin said. “It’s a rustic feel, but very comfortable.”

In the morning, Baba’s chefs will whip up a breakfast and brunch menu that includes pastries, french toast, oatmeal, customizable grain and veggie bowls, sandwiches and La Colombe coffee. Then, later in the day, the lights dim and the spot becomes a spot for cocktails, sliders and music.

“Grandma here is a little bit modern and a little bit edgy,” Iricanin joked. “It’s very transformative.”

One of the eatery’s specialties will be Rakia, a boozy Balkan beverage made from distilled, fermented fruit juice. Patrons can also order cocktails made from various liquors alongside house-made tinctures and infusions and 20 kinds of wine from countries such as Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia.

“We want you to come here, drink cocktails, get a few bites of this, a few bites of that,” said Iricanin.

But it’s also the kind of place where patrons might want to hang out, he added. The restaurant will feature free Wi-Fi, and outlets with USB ports under every seat.

The 2,400-square foot interior, which was designed by Iricanin’s wife, Nya Gill, features a mix of vintage and modern materials, eclectic artwork and antique glass chandeliers. Going along with the comfortable theme, the bar also has a real working fireplace flanked by two leather “king chairs,” as Iricanin calls them.

“You won’t want to leave,” said Iricanin. “Again, think grandma.”

by Tim Regan — January 24, 2017 at 1:15 pm 0

One needs only take a drive through Arlington to see that specialty gyms are all the rage these days.

Like rock climbing? There’s a gym specifically for that. What about kickboxing? Kick away. Rowing? Running? Lifting? You can have it all in one place.

But at one of Arlington’s newest specialty gyms, the focus isn’t trendy workouts or buzzy rash diets, it’s a dedication to form. Or at least, that’s how Corbin Jennings, owner of MADabolic at 3100 Clarendon Blvd, pitches the business, which opened to the public on Labor Day last year.

Located below street level, across from the Clarendon Metro station, MADabolic specializes in 50-minute workouts where groups lift weights, squat, do burpees and run suicides to help bolster their endurance and fitness level. During classes — which are capped at 20 — trainers instruct their clients how to move their bodies.

“If there is one thing I’d say differentiates us from a lot of other programs out there, it’s attention to form,” Jennings said. “Our trainers are not in here on a microphone in dimly lit lights trying to be a cheerleader.”

The workouts aren’t glamorous, nor are they fun. But they’re effective, Jennings said.

“It’s not the fashionable thing to do,” he added. “It’s not trendy, but we’re doing what’s right for the consumer at the end of the day.”

The gym is part of a fitness chain with locations in Charlottesville, Va., along with several others in North Carolina and South Carolina. The name MADabolic contains an acronym that stands for momentum, anaerobic and durability — the core tenets behind the training regimen, Jennings said.

Each location’s workouts are formulated weekly by the company’s founders, former professional hockey players Brandon Cullen and Kirk Dewaele.

“This is all stuff they were doing while they were playing hockey,” said Jennings. “We train you like an athlete and typically the results are like an athlete.”

Currently, the gym has about 100 members, but Jennings hopes to add more in the coming year. Those interested in signing up for classes can visit MADabolic’s website or call the business at 571-319-0172.

by ARLnow.com — January 23, 2017 at 11:45 am 0

"Dog the Bounty Hunter" poses outside Don Tito in Clarendon (courtesy photo)

Duane “Dog” Chapman visited Don Tito (3165 Wilson Blvd) in Clarendon over the weekend.

The bounty hunter and reality show star stopped by the restaurant on Saturday and ordered a plate of fajitas for lunch, we’re told. After chowing down, but before riding away in a black SUV, Chapman posed for a couple of photos.

Chapman was in town with his wife, Beth, attending presidential inauguration events. Beth Chapman, who is politically active as president of the Professional Bail Agents of the United States, donated to the campaigns of both Hillary Clinton and President Donald Trump.

Courtesy photo

by ARLnow.com — January 23, 2017 at 10:00 am 0

The Walgreens store in Clarendon will close on Feb. 21, according to signs in the window.

Located at 2825 Wilson Blvd, the store is located in a designated historic building, a former car dealership, that is protected from redevelopment. The building had its development rights transferred to another Clarendon project in 2012.

Those with prescriptions at the store’s pharmacy will have them transferred to a nearby Walgreens store at 3130 Lee Highway, according to the signs. There’s no word yet as to what will happen to the electric car charging station in the store’s parking lot.

So far, there’s no indication of what might replace the Walgreen’s, nor why exactly it is closing, although sources say high rent is a possible factor. Another possible factor: Walgreens’ plan to close hundreds of stores as part of its expected acquisition of Rite Aid.

by ARLnow.com — January 19, 2017 at 10:15 am 0

Mad Rose Tavern closing party flyerAfter six years in business, Mad Rose Tavern (3100 Clarendon Blvd) is shutting its doors.

The Clarendon bar and restaurant did not look like it was going to survive long after it opened in 2011 and within weeks underwent a management change and, later, a menu change.

However, survive it did, as it focused more on nightlife and events. One memorable moment: bringing in Sisqo of “Thong Song” fame to perform in 2013.

Now, Mad Rose is closing after a final blowout party starting at 8 p.m. on Saturday. (It’s also scheduled to host a Democratic brunch on Sunday.)

Replacing Mad Rose will be a new Asian restaurant called Bao Bar, which will specialize in Taiwanese street food. As reported by the Washington City Paper, restaurant owner Social Restaurant Group, which just opened Pamplona restaurant across the plaza from Mad Rose, is planning a “major renovation” of the space but is hoping to open Bao Bar as early as March.

by Samantha Moore — January 17, 2017 at 1:45 pm 0

Signs are up for a new Japanese ramen noodle restaurant in Clarendon.

Hanabi Ramen will be “coming soon” to the former Amsterdam Falafel space at 3024 Wilson Blvd, next to the future G.O.A.T. Sports Bar.

An exact opening date for the restaurant has not been announced. In an earlier Facebook post, the owner and chef, Kenji, described Hanabi as “an authentic Japanese ramen and gyoza restaurant featuring Japanese chefs.”

“We are currently remodeling the venue to make your ramen and gyoza experience in an authentic Japanese ramen shop as great as possible,” the post says.

by Katie Pyzyk — January 16, 2017 at 12:00 pm 0

Startup Monday header
Sponsored by Monday Properties and written by ARLnow.com, Startup Monday is a weekly column that profiles Arlington-based startups and their founders, plus other local technology happenings. The Ground Floor, Monday’s office space for young companies in Rosslyn, is now open. The Metro-accessible space features a 5,000-square-foot common area that includes a kitchen, lounge area, collaborative meeting spaces, and a stage for formal presentations.

Cybersecurity currently is a frequently discussed but often misunderstood field. At Adlumin, though, it’s a well-understood topic that’s more than just a buzzword. The employees design solutions to identify and prevent potential breaches in clients’ networks.

Adlumin logoCybersecurity is a broad term, but the Adlumin team targets what co-founder and VP of business development Timothy Evans calls “the Edward Snowden problem,” when a seemingly authorized user enters part of the network they’re not allowed to access.

“I realized that corporate breaches were continuing to succeed because attackers were able to steal the identities of employees and use that identity to attack the infrastructure as if they were that person,” said Adlumin president and CEO Robert Johnston. “The problem we set out to solve is the identity access and management piece.”

A small breach such as a user figuring out a computer password can compromise an entire business structure because the illegitimate user often gains access to other accounts with locally-saved passwords, such as Gmail or Twitter.

“Eventually [an intruder can] end up with the keys to the entire kingdom and they can literally access any system or cloud resource they want,” Johnston said.

That’s what happened during the Democratic National Committee hack last year when more than 100 users’ private email accounts were accessed, Johnston said. He led the response effort to the DNC breach and said those hackers “were able to access the system as if they were a user.”

Adlumin team membersAdlumin’s software can “see” and monitor every single user on a client’s network, even on a global scale. It incorporates user behavior analytics — which Johnston said not all cybersecurity companies deal with — to determine if a network is in danger.

“Rob decided we needed to solve a hard problem, which is to find intruders in a network. They don’t use things like malware or ransomware, they’re in the network and they look like your legitimate users,” Evans said. “There’s only one way to find them and that’s based on their behavior patterns to determine whether they’re a real user or a fake user.”

Adlumin’s software monitors a business’ network 24/7 to detect changes in user behaviors. Evans explained that it uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to continuously update information about user habits. If the software detects a potential anomaly, it sends an alert. Think of it like a credit card company tracking a card user’s spending habits and sending a warning notification when an odd purchase occurs.

In addition to providing the monitoring software, Adlumin manages customers’ cyber infrastructure and training.

Clarendon-based Adlumin incorporated in June 2016 and was assisted by the Herndon-based Mach37 cybersecurity business incubator. It now has five full-time employees and plans further expansion this year.

“The Washington, D.C. metro area, and specifically Arlington, is an awesome place to do this business,” Evans said.

Noting the proximity to the country’s top intelligence agencies, Johnston said there’s “a lot of untapped human capital in this area” for cybersecurity.

As far as what’s in store for the future, Johnston said the Adlumin team will continue updating its software algorithms and wants to “dominate the identity and access management piece” of cybersecurity.

by Tim Regan — January 11, 2017 at 1:15 pm 0

Clarendon Mardi Gras parade (Flickr pool photo by John Williams)

Though Mardi Gras is still more than a month away, Clarendon is already gearing up for its yearly festivities.

The 18th Annual Clarendon-Courthouse Mardi Gras Parade is slated to kick off on Fat Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m. on Wilson Boulevard, organizers have announced. During the parade, revelers will make their way from N. Barton Street to N. Irving Street.

Previous years have brought masked characters, dogs in costumes, marching bands and other performers to the neighborhood.

After the parade, partiers looking for more fun can head to the second-ever Clarendon Mardi Gras Ball at the Clarendon Ballroom (3185 Wilson Blvd.) The party is scheduled to run from 7 to 11 p.m.

“There will be plenty of music, great food in the Fat Tuesday tradition, and beer, wine and punch,” an organizer wrote of the Mardi Gras party. Tickets for the ball are scheduled to go on sale soon.

The parade isn’t the only way Arlington residents and businesses are getting ready for the holiday. Bayou Bakery in Courthouse is currently taking orders for frosted king cakes.

One king cake costs $39.95, and a limited number of king cakes will be sold in stores each day. Customers can also order the cakes and pick them up 48 hours later.

Photo by John Williams

by Tim Regan — January 10, 2017 at 4:55 pm 0

The beer taps at Clarendon’s Sehkraft Brewing are now permanently dry.

That’s because the bar, restaurant and hangout at 925 N. Garfield Street officially closed today, with the help of the Arlington County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff’s deputies showed up today around noon to evict the business, according to Major Susie Doyel, a Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman. A representative for the landlord said the business had until noon today to vacate the building but declined to give more information about the eviction.

Court records show that legal proceedings leading up to the eviction were first initiated in October.

A number of people could be seen inside the business this afternoon, talking and taking stock of the contents while workers with tools walked in and out of the building.

Sehkraft held one last hurrah for customers last night, with live music playing and the college football championship on TV. The brewpub first announced it was closing on Friday evening.

We were unable to reach a Sehkraft Brewing representative for comment. The business first opened a little more than a year ago.

by ARLnow.com — January 10, 2017 at 8:45 am 0

Snow on the pavement along Columbia Pike (Flickr pool photo by Bekah Richards)

Clarendon Restaurant Opening Basement Lounge — New Clarendon restaurant Ambar is planning to open a cafe, restaurant and cocktail lounge called Baba later this month. The basement space will have a separate kitchen and will serve craft cocktails and La Colombe coffee. [Washington Post, Facebook]

Four Mile DMV Still Closed — Though it was originally supposed to reopen on Monday, the Four Mile Run Virginia DMV office renovations are taking a bit longer than expected. “The reopen date for the Four Mile Run office is now tentatively January 12,” a DMV spokeswoman told ARLnow.com. “Our contractor is working hard to put the finishing touches on everything.”

County Publishes Paperless ‘Citizen’ — Arlington County has published an online-only “bonus” version of its Citizen newsletter, which is usually mailed to every household in the county. “You’re probably recycling lots of tree-based products this month so we’re saving a bit of room in your curbside bin,” the top of the online publication says. [Arlington County]

Flickr pool photo by Bekah Richards

by ARLnow.com — January 6, 2017 at 6:30 pm 0

Sehkraft Brewing in Clarendon

(Updated at 7:10 p.m.) Sehkraft Brewing in Clarendon will be closing next week, ARLnow.com has learned.

“With deep regret Sehkraft is announcing that we will be closing our doors,” assistant general manager Ricky Shepherd wrote via email Friday night. “Please come out and commemorate with us all weekend as we say goodbye to GREAT friends and to Sehkraft. Last call, last call!”

The brewpub and entertainment venue will close on Tuesday, Jan. 10, just over a year after it first opened. Located at 925 N. Garfield Street, Sehkraft’s opening was stymied by months of delays and what its owner described as regulatory wrangling with the county’s permitting office.

“[It] was an unbelievably arduous two years,” said owner and CEO Devin Hicks.

File photo

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