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by ARLnow.com Sponsor — January 27, 2015 at 8:30 am 837 0

Drs. Natasha Ungerer and Kayleen Gloor have recently opened Clarendon Animal Care, located at 3000 10th Street N., Suite B.

The location previously housed Ellen’s Futons, but has been transformed into a state-of-the-art veterinary care facility. Build-out renovations were completed just before the New Year and the hospital has been open since January 5. Drs. Gloor and Ungerer have been delighted by their new professional home and the warm reception they have received from clients and neighborhood residents.

“We really wanted to open in Arlington, and in Clarendon specifically, because there was a local need, and folks around here are very invested in the human-animal bond, which is something we aim to foster by providing the highest quality veterinary care… and I have the added benefit of being able to walk to work!” said Dr. Gloor, who is a neighborhood local.

“We’ve bucked the standard 15-20 minute appointment norm, and have made 30 minute appointments our minimum” said Dr. Ungerer. Both veterinarians emphasize client communication and education as the foundation of their practice.

“I don’t ever want a client to walk out the door not knowing why I chose the tests or treatments I did — or to feel confused about what they’re supposed to do for follow up” said Dr. Gloor, who takes pride in her diagrams, client handouts, and use of non-medical jargon in appointments to ensure clients have the necessary tools and information to make informed decisions about their pet’s care.

The vets’ approach to their clients and patients can be summed up by one of their clients, Stephen Harris.

“[Drs. Gloor and Ungerer] have been taking care of our four legged kids for years and we are so happy they have their practice together now,” Harris said. “They are thorough and thoughtful, they have always made sure we understand everything going on with our kids when they were not well. They have gone out of their way to check up on the pups when they were sick, even calling on the weekends. We just got a chance to check out their new state-of-the-art veterinary clinic and wish them the best of luck with the Clarendon Animal Care!”

Hospital services include: comprehensive medical exams (wellness/preventive care, domestic & international health certificates, and sick pet/urgent care exams), as well as general soft tissue surgery, dentistry, digital radiology, and in-house and reference laboratory diagnostics.

Clarendon Animal Care is open:

  • Monday – Thursday from 7:30am – 7:30pm
  • Friday from 7:30am – 5:30pm
  • Saturday from 7:30am – 12:30pm

Check out their website www.clarendonanimalcare.com, or visit them on Facebook. Appointments can be made by phone at 703-997-9776, email at [email protected], or via website request. If you happen to be in the area, feel free to stop in to say “hi,” meet the doctors and staff and get a tour of the clinic.

Reference this ARLnow article and receive $25 off your first veterinary visit.

The preceding article was sponsored by Clarendon Animal Care.

by Ethan Rothstein — November 7, 2014 at 11:30 am 1,257 0

PetMac in Virginia Square, which is closing this year A cat rests in a display at PetMac in Virginia Square, which is closing this year

PetMAC, the pet supply store and adoption center at 822 N. Kenmore Street in Virginia Square, is closing its doors before the end of the year and moving to Reston.

The store’s lease ends at the end of December, according to owner Cindy Williams, and business has slowed down to the point where she can’t afford to keep the store in such an expensive area.

The people of Arlington have been great and we love our Ashton Heights and Lyon Park neighbors. However, more and more people are telling us they are purchasing online,” she said. “That, coupled with PetCo opening down the street, has hurt our sales dramatically. I tried to move elsewhere in Arlington but everything was too expensive for a small, independently owned shop like PetMAC. I hate leaving our loyal customers but we just can’t afford to stay.”

PetMAC is planning to open a store in Reston’s Lake Anne Plaza, where it will move some of its inventory. Williams expects the Virginia Square location to close depending on when the Reston shop is ready to open. Her Arlington customers will get 20 percent off for the next year when they visit the Reston store.

PetMAC will continue to host its adoption events until the store closes, including this Saturday from noon to 4:00 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 2:00 p.m.

by Andrea Swalec — September 25, 2014 at 10:00 am 1,498 0

Clarendon Animal Care owners Kayleen Gloor (left) and Natasha Ungerer (Photo courtesy of Clarendon Animal Care)A new doctor’s office for cats and dogs is coming to Clarendon.

Two locals are opening a veterinary clinic on N. 10th St. between N. Garfield and N. Highland Streets. Set to open in early 2015, Clarendon Animal Care will provide a range of treatments.

“We’ll be a full-service general practice doing everything from wellness care to geriatric treatments to management of chronic conditions,” co-owner Kayleen Gloor said.

Gloor, 32, and co-owner Natasha Ungerer, 34, will also perform basic dentistry and have X-ray machines. The office will focus on making both human and animal clients comfortable and helping pet owners understand how to keep their companions healthy.

“I can’t count the number of times people have told me they wish I were their own medical doctor because I explain things so clearly,” Gloor said.

Clarendon Animal Care will replace Ellen's Futons on N. 10th Street.The 3000 N. 10th St. storefront was previously home to Ellen’s Futons, which has locations in Alexandria, Laurel and Rockville.

Gloor, an Arlington resident, and Ungerer, a McLean resident, met during an internship at a veterinary emergency office in Gaithersburg. They believe Clarendon Animal Care will be the only all-woman-owned veterinary clinic in Arlington. The majority of veterinary students are women, yet few own their own practices, Gloor said.

“It’s a bit of an old boys’ club.”

by Andrea Swalec — September 22, 2014 at 1:30 pm 1,321 0

A kitten named Speedo is getting the physical therapy he needs.

The Animal Welfare League of Arlington is treating a two-month-old domestic shorthair known as a “swimmer” cat who walks by making swimming-like motions with his front paws.

Born with rear legs that splay outward, Speedo was dropped off at the AWLA at 2650 S. Arlington Mill Dr. by an owner who wasn’t in the position to deal with his medical issues, Chief Operating Officer Susan Sherman said.

The shelter found a foster home for the kitten, who gets physical therapy treatments every day. Rather than opting for surgery on his legs, Speedo gets massages and may even receive acupuncture treatments.

“The massage is meant to train the muscles and ligaments,” Sherman said. “The acupuncture would stimulate nerves.

“We do not believe he’s in any pain,” she added.

AWLA veterinarians made a special “alley” for Speedo to walk through with his hind legs bound, encouraging him to walk correctly.

To help pets like Speedo, AWLA is asking for donations to their Woody and Mickey Healthy Pet Fund, which helps special needs pets by paying for”above and beyond” services like orthopedic surgery, blood tests and dental surgery.

Despite his ongoing treatments, Speedo is a sweetheart, Sherman said.

“He is adorable. He’s very sweet and amazingly friendly.”

AWLA expects the kitten will need a permanent home later this year.

“We’re going to see how much he’s able to progress, and as soon as we think he’s going to be able to live a healthy, happy life, he’ll be up for adoption,” she said.

AWLA made this video of Speedo walking through his “alley”: 

by Morgan Fecto — June 25, 2014 at 1:15 pm 790 0

popslogo-final_print-227x300To celebrate its 70th anniversary, the Animal Welfare League of Arlington has partnered with the Arlington Philharmonic to stage “Pops for Pets,”  a free concert for people and dogs alike.

The inaugural event will be held at Lubber Run Amphitheater this Sunday, June 29, starting at 6:00 p.m.

Attendees can bring their dogs and a picnic meal, or buy boxed dinners from La Cote d’Or onsite. The AWLA will also hold a raffle for a birdhouse replica of the Lincoln-era White House. The philharmonic will play “marches and animal-related classics” from pieces by Aaron Copland, John Philip Sousa and Johann Sebastian Bach, according to an AWLA press release.

“Both of our organizations are really quite enthused about this, so we’ll see what the public response is,” John Ratigan, board chair of the philharmonic, said. The philharmonic and the AWLA hope “Pops for Pets” will become an annual event.

A combination of the open amphitheater and “accessible” music selection, Ratigan said, makes this event more of a crowd-pleaser than a typical orchestral performance.

Arlington County Board Chair Jay Fisette’s 13-year-old Border Collie-mix, Cassie, will serve as honorary co-chair of the event.

“She is like a little Buddah,” Fisette said of his dog, which he found on the street while visiting family in Texas.

Concert-goers’ donations will go toward funding the event and “the missions of both organizations,” AWLA Board Chair Pat Ragan said. “It’ll be a great community event.”

Following its 7oth Anniversary Summer Soiree, “Pops for Pets” will continue to celebrate both AWLA’s anniversary and their on-going efforts to find homes and provide care for over 3,000 animals.

AWLA was founded during World War II, and the foresight of the founders is not lost on AWLA President and CEO Neil Trent.

“Back in the ’40s they thought of this in a coffee shop with a war going on,” Trent said. “They said hey, let’s help animals… and they weren’t sitting at the corner Starbucks either.”

Retractable leashes will not be allowed at the event. In the event of inclement weather, “Pops for Pets” will be rescheduled for Tuesday, July 1 at 6:00 p.m.

by ARLnow.com — June 25, 2014 at 9:00 am 1,523 0

Sunset Paddle (Flickr pool photo by David Bender)

Board Members Spar Over Streetcar PR Funds — Of the $7-8 million contract with Parsons Transportation Group to serve as project manager of Arlington’s streetcar system, up to $650,000 will be spent on “public-education efforts during the first year of the contract.” That isn’t sitting well with Board member and streetcar critic Libby Garvey. “We should not be wasting $650,000 on PR,” she is quoted as saying. [InsideNova]

DJ Pleads Guilty to Assaulting Women — DJ Joey Flash, who counts A-Town Bar and Grill in Ballston among his former clients, has pleaded guilty to charges of rape and sexual battery. The nightlife fixture, whose real name is Joseph Rivera, admitted to bringing highly intoxicated women back from bars, having sex with them while they were unconscious, and filming the encounters. [Washington Post]

Capital Bikeshare Runs Out of Membership Keys — Anyone wanting to sign up for Capital Bikeshare will have to wait until the second week of July. CaBi says it has run out of membership keys “due to issues with our supplier, and heavier than anticipated member sign ups.” [DCist]

Animal Hospital Coming to Shirlington — Two veterinarians will be opening a new facility, Shirlington Animal Hospital, this fall at 2770 S. Arlington Mill Drive. [Shirlington Village Blog Spot]

Sinclair Hoping to Close on WJLA Sale Soon — Sinclair Broadcast Group, which is buying Rosslyn-based TV station WJLA (ABC 7), is hoping to close on the sale by July 27. The company is selling TV stations in Harrisburg, Pa. and Charleson, S.C. to facilitate FCC approval of the acquisition of WJLA and six other Allbritton Communications stations. [Arkansas Business]

Flickr pool photo by David Bender

by Ethan Rothstein — February 10, 2014 at 10:00 am 970 0

AWLA cat (photo via Facebook)The Animal Welfare League of Arlington is hosting a special adoption event starting on Valentine’s Day (Friday), giving residents a chance to show some love to some rescue animals.

The “Be Mine” promotion runs from Friday, Feb. 14 to Monday, Feb. 17. Prospective pet owners can pay a discounted fee of $14 to bring home a cat, rabbit or other small animal. The fee covers a certificate for a free exam with a participating veterinarian, spay or neuter surgery, a feline leukemia and feline AIDS test (for cats), age-appropriate vaccinations, a personalized I.D. tag, a microchip, an information packet and an emergency sticker.

“There is nothing like the companionship and unconditional love you receive from a four-legged friend,” AWLA President and CEO Neil Trent said in a press release. “We invite the community to come to the League, meet their match and provide a shelter animal with a loving home.”

AWLA is located at 2650 S. Arlington Mill Drive. It is open on Friday from noon to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4:00 p.m.

Photo via Facebook

by Ethan Rothstein — October 22, 2013 at 3:30 pm 1,420 0

chef-phoebeHalloween is just over a week away, but this weekend is the unofficial kickoff to the celebrations.

There are a number of events happening around Arlington for the holiday this weekend. Among them:

Doorways’ Howl-o-ween Dog Walk for the Homeless
Saturday, Oct. 26, from 11:00 to 11:30 a.m.
Doorways, a domestic violence shelter for women and their children, is hosting a dog-walking fundraiser at Big Walnut Park (1915 N. Harrison Street). While many similar shelters don’t allow pets, Doorways provides a place for both victims of domestic abuse and their pets. Visitors are encouraged to dress themselves and their pets in Halloween costumes, and dogs can compete for prizes. Registration is $30 for adults and $20 for children under 16, with proceeds going to Doorways.

FALLoween at Market Common Clarendon
Saturday, Oct. 26, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Market Common Clarendon, at 2700 Clarendon Blvd, is hosting its own pet-friendly parade Saturday morning. There will be trick-or-treating, a mini pumpkin and a petting zoo. A pet and human costume parade will start at 11:00 a.m. and a “Princess vs. Superhero fitness contest” will run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All events are free.

Douglas Park Halloween Trail of Terror
Saturday, Oct. 26, starting at 7:00 p.m.
Douglas Park will host its second annual  haunted trail this Saturday evening Starting at 1620 S. Quincy Street, visitors will walk through Douglas Park and walk through trails where they’ll encounter goblins, swamp monsters and other ghouls and ghosts. There will also be a children’s area with milder fun. To experience the trail, visitors should bring canned food for donation to the Arlington Food Assistance Center.

Elliot in the Morning’s Halloween Bash
Friday, Oct. 25, starting at 8:00 p.m.
Friday night at Clarendon Ballroom (3185 Wilson Blvd), DC101’s Elliot in the Morning show will host a costume party with a $3,000 cash prize going to the winner. Doors will open at 8:00 p.m. and the cover charge is $15 before 10:00 p.m. No costumes with stilts or weapons will be permitted. Sixty party-goers will be selected by judges in the crowd to be finalists by 10:30 p.m., and crowd applause will determine the winner among those 60.

Frame from NosferatuNot So Silent Cinema Presents Nosferatu
Saturday, Oct. 26, starting at 8:00 p.m.
At Artisphere (1101 Wilson Blvd) Saturday night, a klezmer quintet will play accompaniment to the 1922 silent movie classic “Nosferatu,” cinema’s first vampire flick. The movie will be shown at the Dome Theater. Tickets are $15.

HiBall Monster Bar Crawl
Friday, Oct. 25, from 4:00 to 9:00 p.m.
HiBall events is hosting a bar crawl Friday evening from Courthouse to Ballston, from 4:00 to 9:00 p.m. Participating bars include Spider Kelly’s, World of Beer, Wilson Tavern, Whitlow’s on Wilson and The Front Page. Tickets are $15 and participating revelers can participate in a costume contest via Facebook, with the winner getting $200 and gift cards from participating restaurants.

Photo courtesy of Doorways

by Ethan Rothstein — October 3, 2013 at 12:30 pm 957 0

Blessing-of-animalsTwo Arlington congregations will holding Blessing of the Animals events this weekend.

Saturday, from 2:00 to 2:30 p.m., St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church will hold blessings for pets on the grassy area at the Clarendon intersection of Fairfax Drive, Washington Blvd and Clarendon Blvd, next to Northside Social. The service is being held in honor of medieval animal lover St. Francis of Assisi, and “Catholic and non-Catholic pets and people are welcome,” according to the event announcement.

On Sunday, the Rock Spring Congregational UCC will hold its own Blessing of the Animals, at 3:00 p.m. The service will be held on the church’s lawn at 5010 N. Little Falls Road. Visitors are encouraged to “come with the pets who share their life with us.”

Image via St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church

by ARLnow.com — August 28, 2013 at 9:55 am 1,182 0

Unleashed by Petco store in Ballston Unleashed by Petco store in Ballston

The new “Unleashed by Petco” store in Ballston is expected to open next week.

A sign on the door of the store, on the 3900 block of Wilson Blvd, says it will open on Wednesday, Sept. 4. The former tenant, a burger restaurant called Wiinky’s, closed on March 31.

Unleashed by Petco is a “boutique” version of the pet retailer’s large-format stores. There is a limited amount of free, off-street surface parking in front of the store.

by Ethan Rothstein — July 3, 2013 at 10:00 am 439 0

The Fourth of July — traditionally filled with fireworks exploding and open flames for barbecues — can be dangerous for pets, the Animal Welfare League of Arlington warns. All sorts of hazards can cause dogs and other critters harm or cause them to run away.

“Dogs have acute hearing — far more sensitive than human hearing — so firework explosions, excited voices, visual stimulation and smells can panic dogs causing them to be fearful, which can activate their fight or flight response,” Alice Burton, Chief Animal Control Officer for the AWLA, said in a press release. “For their own safety this holiday, indoor-outdoor cats should be kept indoors and when outside, dogs should be kept on a leash.”

The AWLA offers some tips to make sure the household pets have a safe holiday.

  • Leave them at home inside. Fireworks, crowds and fanfare can be stressful for pets, causing them to panic or run off. Leave them in a safe area with a television or radio playing to mask frightening sounds.
  • Alcoholic drinks poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma or in severe cases, die from respiratory failure.
  • Do not apply sunscreen or insect repellent that is not specifically indicated for animals. Ingestion can cause drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. Deet, a common insecticide, may cause neurological issues.
  • Keep lighter fluid and matches away from pets. Chlorates, a chemical substance found in some matches, if ingested, can cause difficulty breathing, damage blood cells or even cause kidney disease. Lighter fluid can cause skin irritation, respiratory and gastric problems.
  • Citronella and insect coils harm pets. Insect repellants are irritating toxins to pets. Inhalation can cause severe respiratory illness such as pneumonia, which can harm a pet’s nervous system.
  • Resist feeding table food. A change in diet can give a pet severe indigestion and diarrhea. Foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes, raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals.
  • Keep pets away from glow jewelry. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling, gastrointestinal irritation and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing the pieces of plastic.
  • Never use fireworks around pets. While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals.

Flickr pool photo by ameschen

by Katie Pyzyk — May 14, 2013 at 4:30 pm 581 0

Pet psychic Diane Roadcap with the Dalai Lama (photo via Arlington Metaphysical Chapel)Have you ever wondered what Fido and Fluffy are trying to tell you? You may have an opportunity to find out, thanks to a weekend celebration at Arlington Metaphysical Chapel featuring a pet psychic.

This Friday, May 17, through Sunday, May 19, the chapel is holding its annual Honoring Animals Weekend. From pet portraits to a behavior class to a blessing of the animals service, a variety of activities will be offered. Perhaps one of the largest draws, however, will be pet psychic Diane Roadcap.

Roadcap has been featured in a variety of publications, such as the Washington Post, because she says she can communicate with animals. She has also been lauded for her assistance to shelter animals.

Roadcap will be holding a class called “Animal Communication: Yes, you can do it!” on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Her psychic pet reading sessions have already sold out for the weekend.

Other instructors will also hold classes and consultation sessions, such as reiki healing and dog massages, at Arlington Metaphysical Chapel (5618 Wilson Blvd) for Honoring Animals Weekend. The full class list and registration can be found online.

by ARLnow.com — April 15, 2013 at 12:45 pm 2,195 0

Editor’s Note: This new sponsored column on pet safety is written by Terry Haas, a pet care professional. Terry owns Loyalty Pet Care and its Safety Furst division.

Dog in a car (photo by Terry Haas)Recently, a dog owner in Virginia left a store only to discover police and rescue personnel surrounding her car. The two dogs she had left in the car, parked in the shade with the windows cracked for about an hour, had died. In spite of her insistence that she had just “made a mistake — a huge mistake,” the dog owner was charged with two felony counts of animal cruelty.

She didn’t know her actions would cause her dogs harm, and unfortunately for many dogs, she’s not alone. According to Alice Burton, Chief of Animal Control Animal Welfare League of Arlington, it happens more often than you might think.

“We have 62 cases in our system where our Animal Control Officers responded to a call of a dog trapped in a hot car,” Burton said. “However, the number of times it is reported is higher (probably 80) because if the dog is not in distress (panting, barking) we do not respond, but will monitor the situation. Owners that leave their pet in the vehicle could be charged with Cruelty to Animals which is a Class 1 misdemeanor.”

On a warm, sunny or even an overcast day, the average normal-muzzle dog left to wait in a parked vehicle will be in respiratory distress in 10 minutes and dead in 20. A dog with a shorter muzzle (such as a Pug or Boston Terrier) will expire in even less time.

We all want to consider our dogs part of the family. We want to take them everywhere. But dogs differ from humans in ways that, if we aren’t careful, can result in tragic accidents.

Humans and some animals (horses, for example) sweat to cool themselves. Our type of sweating allows us to expend energy over long periods while maintaining safe body function. We have endurance. We can also acclimate to warming temperatures.

Although dogs have sweat glands, too, they’re not designed for cooling.  Dogs cool themselves by panting, which cools the mouth and tongue as well as the blood flowing through the head, an obviously inefficient process. They also get some extra support by finding good places to rest. They find cool surfaces to press against the thinly furred areas of their bodies.

Watch your dog when it’s hot. Outdoors, he’ll select a shady spot, maybe dig up some cool earth beneath the surface, and lie in that spot. Indoors, he’ll flop onto a cool tile floor.

A parked car collects sunlight like a solar cell. The temperature in the car rises rapidly, turning the interior into an oven. Dogs can’t say “let me out,” and we often misinterpret their body language and limitations. There is no cool earth or tile floor in a car, and the dog can’t open the door to go look for a cooler spot. As animal guardians, we need to educate ourselves on how to prevent these dangerous situations. Laws like Virginia’s are designed to help speed the education process along.

What might surprise you is that it doesn’t have to be a hot summer day to be deadly to take your dog along while you run errands. When it’s just 70 degrees outdoors, the interior of your car becomes dangerous. To help remember this, think of the “Canine Car Cutoff” — 40/70.

  • When it’s 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below outside, your dog DOES NOT ride along with you.
  • When it’s 70 degrees Fahrenheit or above outside, your dog DOES NOT ride along with you.
  • When it’s between 40 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s OKAY to take your dog on a ride-along where he might be unattended in your parked vehicle with access to water for short periods.

(more…)

by ARLnow.com — February 20, 2013 at 12:05 pm 1,738 20 Comments

This week’s Arlington Pet of the Week is Kochi, an 8-year-old rescue kitty who lives in Aurora Hills.

Kochi is a survivor. She overcame a near-death experience last Christmas, says her owner, Martha.

Last Christmas, Kochi nearly died because her vet recommended an an over the counter drug to relieve a skin condition. It was not specified that the medicine should not contain aspirin or ibuprofen, which as it turns out, is toxic to both cats and dogs.

After an IV and blood transfusion from another good-hearted donor kitty, Kochi is fully recovered. She knows most pet owners are familiar with toxics like Poinsettia, chocolate and antifreeze, but wants to warn other pets that if anyone tries to give you aspirin or ibuprofen, spit it out quickly and go get a big drink of water!

The Arlington Pet of the Week is sponsored by Dogma Bakery, which has locations at The Village at Shirlington (2772 S. Arlington Mill Drive) and the Lee Harrison Shopping Center (2445 N. Harrison Street).

Want your pet to be considered to be the Arlington Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] Each week’s winner receives either a $25 Dogma gift card or a prize from another pet-related business.

by ARLnow.com — January 28, 2013 at 10:00 am 480 12 Comments

Blue snow melt (photo by Katie Pyzyk)

Water Main Work Complete — Arlington County crews completed repairs on a 30″ water main near Arlington Boulevard and N. Irving Street Friday. As of Saturday, parts of the county that experienced low water pressure as a result of the repairs were back to normal service, according to the Department of Environmental Services.

New Asst. Superintendent Appointed — The Arlington School Board has appointed a new Assistant Superintendent of Instruction. Connie Skelton, a 22-year APS employee who started her career as a middle school science teacher, has been appointed to the position effective immediately. She replaces Dr. Mark Johnston, who was one of numerous senior APS staffers to depart since 2010. [Arlington Public Schools]

Vote on New Williamsburg School Expected Feb. 7 — School Board members are expected to vote on the concept for a new elementary school on the Williamsburg Middle School campus on Feb. 7. The $43 million school project has attracted scrutiny from Fairfax County due to possible traffic impacts. [Sun Gazette]

Fmr. CIA Officer Sentenced — John Kiriakou, a former CIA officer who lives in Arlington, has been sentenced to 30 months in prison. Kiriakou pleaded guilty in October to intentionally disclosing the identity of a covert CIA agent to a journalist. [U.S. Dept. of Justice]

‘Unleashed’ Open at Pentagon Row — Unleashed by Petco, a new pet store, has opened at Pentagon Row (1101 S. Joyce Street). The store offers “everyday pet essentials along with top-shelf natural, raw, organic, dehydrated and freeze-dried nutrition.” [Petco]

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